TWELFTH NIGHT CRITICAL ANTHOLOGY

LISA HOPKINS Marriage, 1998
Marriage is a plot device to provide comic closure, but is rarely achieved Hopkins, 1998
In tragedy worlds may be broken and assumptions overturned; in the comic universe the world remains fundamentally the same Hopkins, 1998
Marriage is so central a topic in Shakesperian comedy it problematised the genre classifications of dark comedies ‘Measure for Measure’ and ‘All’s Well that End’s well’ Hopkins, 1998
Comedy lacked a theory like Aristotle provided for tragedy, but growing tradition made marriage the goal of romantic comedy Hopkins, 1998
FRANCOIS LAROQUE FESTIVE TRADITION, 2003
When Puritans attacked abuses and excesses of papists, Shakespeare stood in defense of old holiday passtimes Francois Laroque, 2003
Shakespeare’s subplots insist on dissonance and cacophony, or on men that have no music in them. Francois Laroque, 2003
Young lovers are allowed to leave the labryinth of errors, tricks or illusions that had been wrought upon them Francois Laroque, 2003
Shakespeare’s festive comedies revel in carnival spirit of liberty and irreverence Francois Laroque, 2003
R.W.MASLEN RESILIENCE OF COMIC DRAMA AS AN EVOLVING FORM, 2004
Comedy ends by demonstrating its resistance to any form of containment R.W.Maslen, 2004
Comedy was the dramatic form that dealt with commoners R.W.Maslen, 2004
WALTER KERR FEATURES OF COMEDY, 1967
Tragedy speaks of freedom. Comedy will speak of nothing but limitation Walter Kerr, 1967
Comedy depends upon tragedy Walter Kerr, 1967
We laugh because there is nothing else we can do about it Walter Kerr, 1967
In tragedy there is always hope Walter Kerr, 1967
Comedy occurs when there is no way out Walter Kerr, 1967
DAVID BEVINGTON MALVOLIO, PURTIANISM AND FESTIVITY, 2002
He is an enemy of merriment and hence a foe of the kind of theatre Twelfth Night represents David Bevington, 2002
Toby is an impercurious (penniless) relative and a kind of Falstaffian moocher David Bevington, 2002
Malvolio is drawn into a ‘crime of social aspirations’ Bevington, 2002
Malvolio is a hypocrite- secretly he longs for the pleasures of this world Bevington 2002
Maria also a hypocrite much alike to M, she tries to impersonate someone of high social standing; the fluidity of her ‘great P’s’ signify her desire for social fluidity Allison.P.Hobgood, 2006
JOHN HOLLANDER FEASTING, INDULGENCE AND THE HUMOURS, 1956
It is an Epiphany plan- a ritualised Twelfth Night festivity in itself John Hollander, 1956
It develops an ethic of indulgence Hollander, 1956
The play seems almost intent on destroying the whole theory of comedy Hollander, 1956
The movement of the play is that of a party Hollander, 1956
MICHAEL SHAPIRO GENDER AND THEATRICALITY, 1995
On the theatrical level, Viola still was and always would be male Michael Shapiro, 1995
The two brides to be in the play were young male actors Shapiro, 1995
Viola is revealed as a woman but she remains in Cesario’s clothes and is still called Cesario— it underscored the presence of the boy actor for the audience Shapiro, 1995
PETER HOLLAND THE OTHER TWIN
The play where a brother thought dead is then wonderfully reunited with his surviving twin sister is a yearning fantasy Peter Holland
Hamnet Shakespeare buried 11 August 1596 (twin sister was Judith) Peter Holland
Viola= a sense she is an instrument of the play, a viol played on by others Peter Holland
The play is comforting in the shared grief of loss but also despairing as Judith and Hamnet never reunited Peter Holland
Viola is performing Cesario and performing Sebastian “for him I imitate” denying his death by making him alive in her performance Peter Holland
Play has English Knights with comic surnames that speak to their natures, Belch and Aguecheek Peter Holland
Maria’s casual indifference to Fabian’s cautian about driving Malvolio mad indicate something has gone wrong “the house will be quieter” Nancy Lindheim, 2007
Maria’s marriage is a triumph of the scheming female underclass (although one might expect sympathy for a woman of wit and perceptiveness trapped in the narrow choices offered by society, is challenged) Nancy Lindheim, 2007
“Twelfth Night and plays like it offer audiences what can be called “anxious laughter” – a laughter born out of a mix of gratitude it hasn’t happened to me, pleasure at other people’s misfortune, surprise at the unexpected, and delight in the success in showing people (apart from yourself) can be conned, thereby proving that you are at the very least no more foolish than the next person.” Michael Rosen, 2004

You Might Also Like