Tragedy- Othello quotes

Act 1 Scene 1- Iago illustrates Othello’s hubris But he as loving his own pride and purposes
Act 1 Scene 1- Iago illustrates Othello’s pride and reputation as a soldier Horribly stuffed with epithets of war
Act 1 Scene 1 – Iago’s casual sexism as he discusses Cassio A fellow almost damned in a fair wife
Act 1 Scene 1- Iago reveals his motives, the jealousy of Cassio’s promotion Preferment goes by letter and affection//And not by old gradation
Act 1 Scene 1- Iago reveals he only does his duty to seek revenge on Othello I follow him to serve my turn upon him
Act 1 Scene 1- Iago revels his false nature But I will wear my heart upon my sleeve// For daws to peck at- I am now what I am
Act 1 Scene 1- Roderigo’s casual racism as he discusses Othello What a full fortune does the thick-lips owe
Act 1 Scene 1- Iago objectifies Desdemona as he and Roderigo awake Brabantio Look to you house, your daughter, and your bags! Thieves, thieves!
Act 1 Scene 1- Iago’s racism as he discusses Othello and his wife to Brabantio an old black ram//Is tupping your white ewe
Act 1 Scene 1- Iago’s racism continues as he discusses Othello’s marriage you’ll have your//daughter covered with a Barbary horse; you’ll have your// nephews neigh to you
Act 1 Scene 1- Brabantio doesn’t know the truth in his words Thou art a villain
Act 1 Scene 1- Roderigo illustrates that he is repulsed by the marriage gross revolt
Act 1 Scene 1- Iago’s dramatic irony as he suggests that he should leave before Othello arrives It seems not meet, nor wholesome to my place//To be produced
Act 1 Scene 1- Brabantio introduces a central theme to the play o, she deceives me
Act 1 Scene 1- Brabantio expresses his betrayal O treason of the blood
Act 1 Scene 1- Brabantio confirms the Rennaissance stereotype of black men Is there not charm// By which property of youth and maidhood//May be abused
Act 1 Scene 1- Brabantio makes his private conflict public Get weapons, ho!//And raise some special officers of night
Act 1 Scene 2- Iago’s dramatic irony as he pretend to be fault to Othello To do no contrived murder
Act 1 Scene 2- Iago suggests that Brabantio has betrayed Othello’s honour And spoke such scurvy and provoking terms// Against your honour
Act 1 Scene 2- Othello initially illustrates his pride as an officer My services which I have done the signory//Shall out-tongue his complaints
Act 1 Scene 2- Othello further illustrates his honour as an officer I fetch my life and being//From men of royal siege
Act 1 Scene 2- Othello expresses his greatness of soul as he declares his love for Desdemona But that I love the gentle Desdemona//For the seas’ worth
Act 1 Scene 2- Othello declared his hubris as he suggests that he must be found My parts, my title, and my perfect soul//Shall manifest me rightly
Act 1 Scene 2- Othello subverts the traditional stereotype of soldiers as he suggests that violence isn’t always the way Keep up your bright swords, for the dew will rust them//Good signor, you shall command with years//Than with your weapons
Act 1 Scene 2- Brabantio declares that Othello has charmed Desdemona Damned as thou art, thou has enchanted her
Act 1 Scene 2- Brabantio illustrates Desdemona as a weak victim to the cunning sexual predator of Othello If she in chains of magic were not bound//Whether a maid, so tender, fair and happy//so opposite to marriage that she shunned
Act 1 Scene 2- Brabantio reveals his casual xenophobia as he suggests that one should be afraid of Othello rather than in love Of such a thing as thou: to fear, not to delight
Act 1 Scene 2- Brabantio confirms the Rennaissance stereotype of black man as he presents Othello as a cunning sexual predator That thou hast practised on her with foul charms//Abused her delicate youth with drugs or minerals
Act 1 Scene 2- Brabantio presents Othello as a villain For an abuser of the world
Act 1 Scene 2- Othello asserts his power as an officer declaring that violence is not necessary Were it my cue to fight, I should have known it//Without a prompter
Act 1 Scene 3- Brabantio presents Desdemona as his property as he declares Othello’s crimes before the senate She us abused, stolen from me, and corrupted
Act 1 Scene 3- Brabantio presents Desdemona as the innocent victim of Othello’s abuse Being not deficient, blind, or lame of sense//Sans witchcraft could not
Act 1 Scene 3- Othello dispels all rumors as he addresses the senate with respect Most potent, grave and reverend signors
Act 1 Scene 3- Othello’s dramatic irony as he suggests he does not speak well in front of a crowd Rude am I in my speech//And little blessed with soft phrase of peace
Act 1 Scene 3- Othello also suggests that Desdemona is now is property I won his daughter
Act 1 Scene 3- Brabantio continues to present Desdemona as a weak and innocent victim as Othello attempts to justify his actions A maiden never bold//Of spirit so still and quiet that her motion//Blushed at herself
Act 1 Scene 3- Brabantio continues to illustrates the xenophobia of his time To fall in love with what she feared to look on
Act 1 Scene 3- Brabantio expresses the unnatural nature of this marriage Against all rules of nature
Act 1 Scene 3- Brabantio a likens Othello to the Devil To find out practices of cunning hell
Act 1 Scene 3- Othello presents a greatness of soul as he allows Desdemona to speak for herself And let her speak of me before her father
Act 1 Scene 3- A moment of foreshadowing as Othello presents a greatness of soul as he illustrates his overwhelming trust for Desdemona but let your sentence//Even fall upon my life
Act 1 Scene 3- Othello presents his hubris as he discuss the difficulties that he has overcome to the senate From year to year- the battles, sieges, fortunes//That I have passed
Act 1 Scene 3- Othello presents he hubris as he boasts about his exotic adventures to the senate Rough quarried, rocks, and hills whose heads tough heaven
Act 1 Scene 3- Othello first discusses why Desdemona was attracted to him She’d come again, and with a greedy ear//Devour up my discourse
Act 1 Scene 3- Othello discusses the sympathy that Desdemona felt towards his struggles She gave me for my pains a world of sighs
Act 1 Scene 3- Othello discusses how he enjoyed the pity he received from Desdemona She loved me for the danger I had passed// And I loved her, that she did pity them
Act 1 Scene 3- Desdemona is allowed to speech and expresses how she belonged to her father You are lord of all me duty
Act 1 Scene 3- Brabantio does not understand the harmful power of words But words are words; I never yet did hear// That the bruised heart was pieced through the ear
Act 1 Scene 3- Desdemona expresses that she now belong completely to Othello My hear’t subdued//Even to the very quality of my lord
Act 1 Scene 3- Desdemona discusses Othello’s honour And to his honours and he valiant parts//Did I my soul and fortunes consecrate
Act 1 Scene 3- Othello presents his greatness of soul as he declares that he is not simply with Desdemona for reasons of lust I therefore beg it not//To please the palate of my appetite
Act 1 Scene 3- A moment of dramatic irony as Othello declares his trust for Iago and puts his wife in Iago’s care A man he is of honesty and trust://To his conveyance I assign my wife
Act 1 Scene 3- In a moment way ahead of his time the duke suggests that there is more to Othello than his race If virtue no delighted beauty lack//Your son-in-law is far more fair than black
Act 1 Scene 3- In a moment of foreshadowing Brabantio plants a seed of doubt into Othello’s head Look to her Moor, if thou hast eyes to see//She has deceived her father and may thee
Act 1 Scene 3- In response to Brabantio’s seed of doubt Othello presents his overwhelming trust for Desdemona My life upon he faith
Act 1 Scene 3- Othello makes an error of judgement as he puts Desdemona in Iago’s control Honest Iago,//My Desdemona must I leave to thee
Act 1 Scene 3- Roderigo expresses he desire to die after he learns about the marriage, this mirrors Othello’s speech moments before his death It is silliness to live, when to live is torment…we have a prescription to die
Act 1 Scene 3- Iago declares the importance of will over instinct Our bodies are our gardeners, to the which our will are gardeners
Act 1 Scene 3- Iago further illustrates the need to control lust with will It is merely the lust of the blood and a permission of the will
Act 1 Scene 3- Iago reveals the greedy motives of his support for Roderigo Put money in they purse
Act 1 Scene 3- Iago presents casual racism as he questions Othello’s will These Moors are changable in their wills
Act 1 Scene 3- Iago reveals his manipulation of Roderigo for money Thus do I make my fool me purse
Act 1 Scene 3- Iago reveals that is actions are simply for enjoyment presenting him as a true villain But for my sport and profit
Act 1 Scene 3- Iago suggests that he is going to manipulate Othello to abuse Othello’s ear
Act 1 Scene 3- Iago identifies Othello’s fatal flaw The Moor if of a free and open nature//Than thinks men honest that but seem to be
Act 1 Scene 3- Iago presents casual racism as he refers to Othello as an animal And will as tenderly be led by th’y nose//As asses are
Act 1 Scene 3- Iago’s plan has been formed Hell and night//Must bring this monstrous birth to the world’s light
Act 2 Scene 1- Montano declares that the Turkish Fleet have drowed If that the Turkish fleet//Be not ensheltered and embayed, they are drowned
Act 2 Scene 1- In a moment of dramatic irony it is suggested that the battles are over Our wars are done
Act 2 Scene 1- Cassio’s caring nature and genuine love for Othello are revealed, this dispels all previous rumors yet he looks sadly//And prays the Moor be safe
Act 2 Scene 1- Cassio presents a genuine concern for Othello who has not yet arrived at Cyprus O, let the heavens//Give him defence against the elements
Act 2 Scene 1- Iago presents casual sexism as he suggests that his wife Emilia talks to much would she give you so much of her lips//As of her tongue she oft bestow on me//You’d have enough
Act 2 Scene 1- Desdemona dispels all previous rumors as she appears bold when she defends Emilia from Iago Alas, she has no speech
Act 2 Scene 1- Iago appears sexist as he suggests that even his own wife lacks sexual morality You rise to play and go to bed to work
Act 2 Scene 1- Iago reveals more of plot to manipulate Cassio With as little a web as this I will ensnare as great a fly as Cassio
Act 2 Scene 1- It is a true high point for the tragic hero as Othello arrives in Cyprus It gives me wonder great as my content//To see you here before me. O , my soul’s joy
Act 2 Scene 1- Othello’s overwhelming joy is clear as he expresses his life is fulfilled If it were now to die//T’were now to be most happy
Act 2 Scene 1- Othello can not hide his joy in this high point of the play I cannot speak enough of this content//It stops me here; it is too much of joy
Act 2 Scene 1- Iago a likens Othello to the devil And what delight//shall she have to look on the devil?
Act 2 Scene 1- Iago suggests that sex will ruin Desdemona and Othello’s relationship When the blood is made dull with the act of sport
Act 2 Scene 1- Iago identifies Cassio’s quick temper as a flaw that can be used against him he’s rash and very sudden in choler, and haply//with his trucheon may strike at you
Act 2 Scene 1- Iago identifies Othello’s greatness of soul as a flaw that can be used against him The Moor//Is of a constant, loving, noble nature//And I dare think, he’ll prove to Desdemona// A most dear husband
Act 2 Scene 1- Iago expresses his motives as revenge as he belives Othello has slept with his wife Till I am evened with him, wife for wife;
Act 2 Scene 1- Iago attempts to use jealousy to seek his revenge I put the Moor//At least into a jealous so strong//That judgment cannot cure
Act 2 Scene 3- Cassio expresses his view of Desdemona Indeed, she is a most fresh and delicate creature
Act 2 Scene 3- Cassio appreciates Desdemona’s beauty An inviting eye, and yet methinks right modest//…she is indeed perfection
Act 2 Scene 3- Cassio identifies alcohol as his weakness I have very poor and unhappy brains for drinking
Act 2 Scene 3- Cassio reveals the importance of reputation as he is desperate for people to not think he is drunk Do not think, gentleman, I am drunk…I am not drunk now: I can stand well and I speak well enough
Act 2 Scene 3- Iago reveals the power of words as he so easily betrays Cassio I had rather this tongue cut from my mouth//Than it should do offence to Michael Cassio
Act 2 Scene 3- Iago presents that all men are weak willed But men are men; the best sometimes forget
Act 2 Scene 3- Othello presents an error of judgement as he trusts Iago over Cassio I know, Iago//Thy honesty and love doth mince this matter//Making it light to Cassio
Act 2 Scene 3- Othello presents an error of judgment as he fires Cassio Cassio I love thee//But nevermore be officer of mine
Act 2 Scene 3- Cassio is devastated as he he loses his reputation Reputation, reputation, reputation! O, I have lost my reputation! I have lost the immortal part of myself
Act 2 Scene 3- Cassio curses the alcohol as he is left devastated Every inordinate cup is unblessed and the ingredience is evil
Act 2 Scene 3- Iago reveals that Othello’s devotion to Desdemona could act as his fatal flaw he hath devoted and given up himself to the contemplation, mark and denotement of her parts and graces
Act 2 Scene 3- Iago reveals that Desdemona’s kind nature is a flaw that can be used against her She is of a free, so kind, so apt, so blessed a disposition… she holds it a vice in her goodness not to do more than she is requested
Act 2 Scene 3- A moment of dramatic irony as Iago reveals himself to be the villain And what’s he then that says I play the villain//When this advice is free I give and honest
Act 2 Scene 3- A moment when Iago further illustrates Desdemona’s innocent and free nature She’s framed as fruitful//As the free elements
Act 2 Scene 3- Iago reinforces Othello’s fatal flaw as his love for Desdemona His soul is so enfetted to her love
Act 2 Scene 3- Iago reveals the deadline nature of words I’ll pour this pestilence into his ear
Act 2 Scene 3- Iago reveals that it is Desdemona’s goodness that will result in their tragic downfall And by how much she strives to do him good//She shall undo her credit with the Moor
Act 2 Scene 3- Iago declares that he will turn Desdemona’s strengths into weaknesses So I will turn her virtue into pitch// and out of her own goodness make the net//That shall enmesh them all
Act 2 Scene 3- Roderigo has a moment of realisation that he is the victim I shall have so much experience for my pains; and so, with no money at all, and a little more with, return to Venice
Act 3 Scene 1- Cassio discusses the purity of Desdemona virtuous Desdemona
Act 3 Scene 1- Cassio makes an error of judgement as discusses his trust for Iago I never knew a Florentine more kind and honest
Act 3 Scene 3- Desdemona makes an error of judgment as she confirms that she will help Cassio be thou assured good Cassio, I will do// all my abilities in thy behalf
Act 3 Scene 3- Desdemona makes an error of judgement as she states that she trusts Iago O, that’s an honest fellow
Act 3 Scene 3- In a moment of dramatic irony Desdemona doesn’t know the truth in here words as she states she would rather die than give up on Cassio For thy solicitor shall rather die//Than give thy cause away
Act 2 Scene 1- Desdemona is putting up a front to maintain appearances as she waits with Iago and Emilia for Othello to arrive safely to Cyprus I am no merry, but I do beguile// The thing I am by seeming otherwise
Act 2 Scene 3- Othello reveals that he and Desdemona are going to have sex for the first time The purchases made, the fruits are to ensue: That profit’s yet to come ‘tween me and you
Act 2 Scene 3- Iago appears crude and bitter as he wishes that Othello and Desdemona have a good time in bed, this contrasts the formality of Cassio’s language Well, happiness to their sheets
Act 2 Scene 3- Iago presents Roderigo as the tragic victim of love Rodergio, Whom love hath turned almost wrong side out
Act 2 Scene 3- Iago introduces the power of pride as he sings with Cassio to get him drunk ‘Tis pride that pulls the country down
Act 2 Scene 3- When Cassio is drunk he reinforces his power over Iago The lieutenant is to be saved before the Ancient
Act 2 Scene 3- Iago begins to manipulate Montano into believing that Cassio should not be trust by Othello I fear the trust Othello puts in him
Act 2 Scene 3- Montano presents Othello’s good nature as he defends the trust Othello put in Cassio his good nature//Prizes the virtue that appears in Cassio// and looks not on his evils
Act 2 Scene 3- In a moment of dramatic iron Iago damns Cassio for his drunken behavious You will be shamed for ever!
Act 2 Scene 3- Othello states that he Cassio has ruined his reputation as lieutenant that you unlace your reputation thus
Act 2 Scene 3- In a moment of dramatic irony Othello states that he is now ruled by his blood Now, by heaven// My blood begins my safer guides to rule
Act 2 Scene 3- In a moment of dramatic irony Othello criticises those who make their private conflict public To manage private and domestic quarrel in night, and on the court and guard of safety
Act 2 Scene 3- Iago states that when angered men do harm to those they love As men in rage strike those that wish them best
Act 2 Scene 3- Iago reveals his bitter opinions of status and reputation Reputation is an idle and most false imposition: oft got without merit and lost without deserving
Act 2 Scene 3- Iago revels that Othello now belongs to Desdemona Our General’s wife is now the General
Act 2 Scene 3- Iago reveals a possible fatal flaw of Othello as he is completely devoted to Dsdemona he hath devoted and given up himself to the contemplation, mark and denotement of her parts and graces
Act 3 Scene 3- Iago begins to plants seeds of doubt into Iago’s mind as he suggests that Cassio is sneaking around behind Othello’s back I cannot think it// That he would sneak away so guilty-like// Seeing you coming
Act 3 Scene 3- Othello states that he will give Desdemona everything I will deny thee nothing
Act 3 Scene 3- Desdemona proves to Emilia that she is obedient but challenges Emilia’s obedience Emilia come. Be as your fancies teach you. Whate’er you be, I am obedient
Act 3 Scene 3- Othello forshadows the chaos that occurs when he no longer loves Desdemona But I do love thee! And when I love thee not, chaos is come again
Act 3 Scene 3- Othello is desperate to find out the evils in Iago’s mind As if there were some monster in his thought//Too hideous to be shown
Act 3 Scene 3- Othello makes an error of judgement as he continues to trust Iago And for I know thou’rt full of honesty// And weigh’st thy words before thou giv’st them breath
Act 3 Scene 3 – In a moment of dramatic irony Iago states that men should be who they are Men should be what they seem
Act 3 Scene 3- As Othello discusses Iago’s thoughts he illustrates the power of words and rumors As thou dost ruminate, and give thy worst of thoughts//The worst of words
Act 3 Scene 3- Iago states that it is in his nature to look into things he suspects As I confess it is my nature’s plague//To spy into abuses
Act 3 Scene 3- Iago continues to act false as he states his honesty prevents him from sharing his thoughts Nor for my manhood, honesty and wisdom//To let you know my thoughts
Act 3 Scene 3- Iago contradicts his previous thoughts as he states that his reputation and good name is of great importance to him But he that filches me my good name//Robs me of that which not enriches him//And makes me poor indeed
Act 3 Scene 3- In arguably the most famous lines of the play, Iago warns Othello about the dangers of jealousy O beware, my lore, of jealousy// It is the green-eyed monster, which doth mock//The meat it feed on
Act 3 Scene 3- Othello denies that he will ever make a life of jealousy Thinks’t thou I’d make a life of jealousy//To follow still the changes of the mood//With fresh suspicions?
Act 3 Scene 3- Othello illustrates his love and admiration for Desdemona but also creates a sense of identity for his wife To say my wife is fair, loves company//Is free of speech, sings, plays, and danses well
Act 3 Scene 3- In a moment of dramatic irony Othello criticises his future actions by suggesting that it would be a weakness to doubt his wife Not from mine own weak merits will I draw//The smallest fear or doubt of her revolt
Act 3 Scene 3- There is a self-assured arrogance as Othello states that Desdemona chose him For she had eyes and chose me
Act 3 Scene 3- In a moment of dramatic irony Othello states that he will not act unless he has proof I’ll see before I doubt; when I doubt, prove; And on the proof, there is no more but this
Act 3 Scene 3- Iago suggests that Othello watches his wife with Cassio Look to your wife; observe her well with Cassio
Act 3 Scene 3- In a moment of dramatic irony Iago states that he wishes to protect Othello’s nature I would not have your free and noble nature//Out of self-bounty be abused
Act 3 Scene 3- Iago plants seed of doubt into Othello’s mind as he mirrors the previous advice of Brabantio She did deceive her father, marrying you
Act 3 Scene 3- Othello makes an error of judgement as he completely trusts the words of Iago This fellow’s of exceeding honesty// And knows all qualities with a learned spirit// of human dealings
Act 3 Scene 3- Othello suggests that he not gentle of soft enough for Desdemona Haply, for I am black// And have not those soft parts of conversation
Act 3 Scene 3- Othello states that he has lost Desdemona and now he must hate her She’s gone: I am abused, and my relief// Must be to loathe her
Act 3 Scene 3- Othello discusses his hate for marriage O, curse of marriage that we can call these delicate creature ours//And not their appetites
Act 3 Scene 3- Othello illustrates his reliance on fate and destiny ‘Tis destiny unshunnable, like death
Act 3 Scene 3- Emilia states how she has stolen the Hankerchief to give to Iago This was her first remembrance from the Moor// My wayward husband hath a hundred times// Wooed me to steal it
Act 3 Scene 3- Emilia tells Iago that she has stolen the hankerchieft Why that the Moor first gave to Desdemona// That which so often you did bid me to steal
Act 3 Scene 3- Iago states that he is already changing the Moor The Moor already changes with my poison
Act 3 Scene 3- Othello states that he would rather not know about the affair I swear ’tis better to be much abused//Than but to know’t a little
Act 3 Scene 3- Othello is saying goodbye to his previous life Farewell the tranquil mind! Farewell content!//Farewell the plumed troops and the bug wars//That make ambition virtue…Farewell Othello’s occupation gone
Act 3 Scene 3- Othello discusses that only those who know about their sorrows feel the pain He that is robbed not wanting what is stolen//Let him know’t, and he’s not robbed at all
Act 3 Scene 3- Othello doesn’t realise the truth in his words as he demands that Iago finds proof Villain, be sure thou prove my love a *****; be sure of it
Act 3 Scene 3- Iago states that it is better to be wise that honest I should be wise; for honesty’s a fool// And loses that is works for
Act 3 Scene 3- The extent of Othello’s tragic downfall becomes clear as he begins to contradict in his speech By the world// I think my wife be honest, and think she is not// I think that thou are just, and think thou art not
Act 3 Scene 3- Iago reveals that passion is Othello’s fatal flaw you are eaten up with passion
Act 3 Scene 3-Iago states that Cassio has spoke about Desdemona in his sleep There are a kind of men so loose of soul// That in their sleeps will mutter their affairs
Act 3 Scene 3- Othello loses all control and plans to violently attack his wife I’ll tear her all to pieces
Act 3 Scene 3- Othello reveals his desire for revenge Arise black vengence, from they hollow cell
Act 3 Scene 3- Othello loses control and sees no other resolution but violence O , blood, blood, blood
Act 3 Scene 4- Desdemona reveals that Othello is not capable of jealousy but my noble Moor// Is true of mind and made of no such baseness//As jealous creature are, it were enough to put him to ill thinking
Act 3 Scene 4- Desdemona reveals once again that Othello is not capable of jealousy I think the sun where he was born//Drew all such humours from him
Act 3 Scene 4- Othello questions Desdemona’s virtue there’s a young and sweating devil here
Act 3 Scene 4- Othello reveals the importance of the hankerchief if she lost it// Or made gift of it, my father’s eye should hold her loathed, and his spirits should hunt//After new fancies
Act 3 Scene 4- Othello reveals the magic of the hankerchief there’s magic in the web of it
Act 3 Scene 4- Emilia reveals that Othello may be jealous Is not this man jealous
Act 3 Scene 4- Emilia reveals that women are the victims of the desires of men They are all but stomachs, and we are all but food// They eat us hungerly, and when they are full// They belch us
Act 3 Scene 4- Desdemona reveals that Othello has changed, illustrating the extent of his tragic downfall My lord is not my lord; nor should I know him//were he in favour as in humour altered
Act 3 Scene 4- Desdemona defends her own right to speak For my free speech!
Act 3 Scene 4- Emilia shares her opinions on jealousy It is a monster// Begot upon itself, born on itself
Act 4 Scene 1- Othello reveals his opinions about the affair it is hypocrisy against the devil
Act 4 Scene 1- Othello reveals that those who cheat are tempted by the devil The devil their virtue tempts, and they tempt heaven
Act 4 Scene 1- Othello loses control of his speech Lie with her? Lie on her
Act 4 Scene 1 – Othello continues to lose control of his speech Hankerchief – confession- hankercheif!
Act 4 Scene 1 – In a moment of dramatic irony Othello reveals that he has not been affected by words but in fact actions It is not words that shakes me thus
Act 4 Scene 1- Iago reveals that his manipulation is succeeding Work on. My medicine, work! Thus credulous fools are caught
Act 4 Scene 1- Iago suggests that Bianca is a prostitute A housewife, that by selling her desires// Buys herself bread and clothes. It is a creature// That dotes on Cassio
Act 4 Scene 1- Iago reveals that he is going to make Cassio smile and laugh to anger Othello Poor Cassio’s smiles, gestures, and light behaviour// Quite in the wrong
Act 4 Scene 1- Cassio discusses the un-natural nature of a marriage between himself and Bianca, which further illustrates the importance of his reputation do not think it so unwholesome
Act 4 Scene 1- In a moment of dramatic irony, Iago confesses to be the villain I am a very villain else
Act 4 Scene 1- Othello asks Iago who he should murder Cassio How shall I murder him Cassion
Act 4 Scene 1- Iago continues to provoke Othello as he discusses the affair And to see how he prizes the// foolish women your wife
Act 4 Scene 1- Othello reveals that despite his anger he can’t help but love his wife A fine woman,a fair woman, a sweet woman
Act 4 Scene 1 – Othello suddenly wishes death and damnation on his wife Ay, let her rot and perish, and be damned tonight, for she shall not live
Act 4 Scene 1- Othello suggests that after this affair he can not love again No, my heart is turned to stone: I strike it and it hurts my hand
Act 4 Scene 1- Othello continues to suggest that there is noone better that Desdemona O, the world hath not a sweeter creature!
Act 4 Scene 1- Othello once again contradicts himself as he suggests that he wishes to violently harm Desdemona I will chop her into messes
Act 4 Scene 1- Iago tells Othello how to murder his wife strangle her in her bed, even the bed she hath contaminated
Act 4 Scene 1- Othello suggests that the justice of murder settle him The justice of it pleases me
Act 4 Scene 1- Lodovico reveals that this new Othello would not be believed in Venice My lord, this would not be believed in Venice
Act 4 Scene 1- Othello reveals that women’s tears are fake If that earth could teem with a women’s tears//Each drop she falls would prove a crocodile
Act 4 Scene 1- Iago’s manipulation continues as he declares his honesty It is not honesty in me to speak// What I have seen and known
Act 4 Scene 2- Emilia swears on her life to Othello that Desdemona is honest I durst my lord to wager she is honest lay down my stole at stake
Act 4 Scene 2- Othello believes that Desdemona is manipulative and sly in her actions This is a subtle *****, A closet lock and key of vilainous secrets
Act 4 Scene 2- Desdemona continues to pledge that she is honest your true and loyal wife
Act 4 Scene 2- Othello declares that Desdemona is false thou art false as hell
Act 4 Scene 2- Othello suggests that his fatal flaw is his lack of patience I should have found in some place of my souL//A drop of patience
Act 4 Scene 2- Othello reveals the danger in Desdemona despite the fact that she appears honest O, thou weed, Who art so lovely fair and smells’t so sweet
Act 4 Scene 2- Desdemona wishes that Emilia lay out her wedding sheets Lay on my bed my wedding sheets
Act 4 Scene 2- Desdemona reveals to Iago that it is her destiny to suffer It is my wretched fortune
Act 4 Scene 2- Emilia illustrates great power as she is aware that someone is behind Othello’s jealousy I will be hanged is some eternal villain//some busy and intriguing rogue//Have not devised this slander
Act 4 Scene 2- Emilia continues to illustrate her power as she suggest someone is controlling Othello’s jealousy The Moor’s abused by some most villainous knave
Act 4 Scene 2- Desdemona reveals that despite Othello’s unkindness, her love will continue Unkindness may do much//And his unkindness may defeat my life//But never taint my love
Act 4 Scene 2- Roderigo has a brief moment of realisation that he is the victim of Iago’s manipulation Every day thou daff’st me with some device Iago…keeps’t from me all conveniency. than suppliest me with the last advantage of hope
Act 4 Scene 2- Roderigo acknowledges that he has been manipulated by Iago I have heard too much; for your words and performances are no kin together
Act 4 Scene 2- Rodergio’s moment of realisation continues With naught but truth. I have wasted myself out of means
Act 4 Scene 2- Iago manipulates Roderigo into killing Cassio I will show you such a necessity in death that you shall think yourself bound to put it on hime
Act 4 Scene 3- Desdemona that her love for Othello makes her accept his actions my love doth so approve him
Act 4 Scene 3- Desdemona suggests that she can’t forget the Willow song That song tonight will not go from my mind
Act 4 Scene 3- Desdemona appears critical of men O, these med, these men
Act 4 Scene 3- Desdemona questions whether a woman would treat her husband as badly as husbands treat their wives That there be women do abuse their husbands in such gross kind
Act 4 Scene 3- Emilia playfully reveals that sh would mis-treat her husband No I neither by this heavenly light: I might do’t as well i’th dark
Act 4 Scene 3- Emilia playfully suggests that sometimes small sacrifices are necessary for great success The world’s a huge thing: it it a great price for a small vice
Act 4 Scene 3- Emilia suggests that for men to have great success they must not take themselves too seriously But for all the whole world! U’d’s pity, who would not make her husband a cuckhold to make him a monarch?
Act 4 Scene 3- Emilia blames men for the bad behaviour of women But I do think it is their husbands’ fault// if wives do fall
Act 4 Scene 3- Emilia lists some of the downfalls of men which results in the bad behaviour of women they slack their duties//And pour our treasures into foreign laps//Or else break out in peevish jealousies
Act 4 Scene 3- Emilia suggests that women seek revenge on their husbands though we have some grace, yet we have some revenge
Act 4 Scene 3- Emilia suggests that women are as powerful as men Let husbands know their wives have sense like them: they see and smell//And have their palates both for sweet and sour//As husbands have
Act 4 Scene 3- Emilia blames men for the ills of women The ills we do, their ills instruct us to
Act 5 Scene 1- Roderigo admits that he has been manipulated by Iago into harming Cassio I have no great devotion to the deed// And yet he hath given me satisfying reason
Act 5 Scene 1- Iago reveals the true extent of his villainy, by suggesting the death of both Cassio and Roderigo will benefit him whether he kill Cassio//or Cassio him, or each do kill the other//Every way makes me gain
Act 5 Scene 1- Iago reveals his jealousy of Cassio He hath a daily beauty in his life//That makes me ugly
Act 5 Scene 1- Othello continues to make an error of judgement as he continues to believe in Iago ‘Tis he! O brave Iago, honest and just//That hast such noble sense of thy friend’s wrong thou teachest me!
Act 5 Scene 1- Othello confirms that he is going to kill his wife in her bed Thy bed, lust-stained, shall with lust’s blood be spotted
Act 5 Scene 1- Roderigo correctly identified Iago as the villain after he has been stabbed O wretched villain!…O damned Iago! O inhuman do!
Act 5 Scene 1- Iago blames Bianca for Cassio’s injuries I do suspect this trash//To be a party in this injury
Act 5 Scene 1- Iago continues to suggest that Bianca is responsible for Cassio’s injury Nay, guiltiness will speak//Though tongues were out of use
Act 5 Scene 1- Iago continues to suggest that Bianca is responsible for Cassio’s death This is the fruit of whoring
Act 5 Scene 1- Emilia supports her husband who is suggesting that Bianca is responsible for Cassio’s injuries O, fie upon thee, strumpet
Act 5 Scene 2- Othello’s soliloquy he struggles between allowing the soldier within him to bring justice or the husband within him to protect and love his wife Yet I’ll not shed her blood//Nor scar that whiter skin of hers than snow//And smooth as monumental alabast
Act 5 Scene 2- Othello believes that this act is necessary to bring justice Yet she must die, else she’ll betray more men
Act 5 Scene 2- Othello turns off the light as he goes to murder his wife Put out the light, and then put out the light
Act 5 Scene 2- Othello believes this murder is necessary to restore Desdemona’s previous purity If I quench thee, thou flaming minister//I can again thy former light restore
Act 5 Scene 2- Othello knows the severity of this murder When I have plucked thy rose//I cannot give it vital growth again//It needs must wither
Act 5 Scene 2- Othello takes justice into his own hands O balmy breath, that dost almost persuade//Justice to break her sword
Act 5 Scene 2- Othello reveals that even after this murder he will continue to love his wife I will kill thee//and love thee after
Act 5 Scene 2- Othello cannot stop loving his wife One more, one more…one more, and this the last//So sweet was n’eer so fatal
Act 5 Scene 2- Othello reveals the difficulty of this murder as he truly loves his wife It strikes where it doth love
Act 5 Scene 2- Othello suggests that Desdemona must prayer, he think he is being fair to allow her this oppurtunity I would not kill thy unprepared spirit
Act 5 Scene 2- For the first time Desdemona is fearful of her husband And yet I fear you: for you’re fatal then//When you’re eyes roll so
Act 5 Scene 2- Othello suggests that Desdemona’s denial is making his actions seem unjustified ‘Thou dost stone my heart//And make’st me call what I intend to do..A murder, which I though a sacrifice
Act 5 Scene 2- Desdemona gives Othello the opportunity to hear the truth which he denies Send him hither//Let him confess a truth
Act 5 Scene 2- Othello states that Cassio has confessed He hath confessed
Act 5 Scene 2- Othello reveals that he has sought revenge on Cassio Had all his hairs been lives, my great revenge//Had stomachs for them all
Act 5 Scene 2- Othello defends his values as a soldier I, that am cruel, am yet merciful;//I would not have thee linger in thy pain
Act 5 Scene 2- Othello is faced with confusion and misery after he has murdered his wife My wife! My wife! What wife? I have no wife
Act 5 Scene 2- Othello suggests that people who murder are crazy It is the very error of the moon//She comes more neared earth than sh was wont//And makes men mad
Act 5 Scene 2- Othello seeks revenge on Cassio as he is aware that Iago hasn’t murdered him Then murder’s out of tune//And sweet revenge grows harsh
Act 5 Scene 2- Desdemona dies an innocent victim A guiltless death I die
Act 5 Scene 2- Desdemona remains loyal to Othello until the end of her life Nobody- I myself-farewell//Commend me to my kind lord- O farewell
Act 5 Scene 2- Othello tells Emilia that he believes Desdemona is a liar She’s like a liar gone to burning hell//’Twas I that killed her
Act 5 Scene 2- Emilia continues to defend Desdemona’s innocence O, the more angel she//And you the blacker devil
Act 5 Scene 2- Emilia defends Desdemona and calls Othello evil thou art a devil
Act 5 Scene 2- Othello suggests that Desdemona was not loyal she was false as water
Act 5 Scene 2- Emilia suggests that Othello’s rash behaviour led him to believe that his wife was not loyal Thou art rash as fire to say//That she was false. O , she was heavenly true!
Act 5 Scene 2- Othello makes an error of judgement once again and suggests that Iago is honest An honest man he is, and hates the slime//That sticks on filthy deeds
Act 5 Scene 2- Emilia cannot believe that her husband is responsible My husband…my husband…my husband
Act 5 Scene 2- Emilia suggests that villainy has destroyed this love villainy hath made mocks with love!
Act 5 Scene 2- Othello defends Iago when Emilia is accusing him of villainy My friend, thy husband, honest, honest Iago
Act 5 Scene 2- Emilia wishes severe punishment on her husband may his pernicious soul//Rot half a grain a day
Act 5 Scene 2- Emilia suggests that Othello will go to hell for this act This deed of thine is no more worthy of heaven//That thou was worthy of her
Act 5 Scene 2- There’s a transformation in Emilia who begins to defend herself Thou hast not half that power to do me harm//As I have to be hurt…As ignorant as dirt
Act 5 Scene 2- Emilia hopefully suggests that Othello is blaming Iago You have done well//That men must lay their murders on your neck
Act 5 Scene 2- Once again Emilia hopes that Iago is not responsible I know thou did’st not: thou’rt not such a villain//Speak for my heart is full
Act 5 Scene 2- Emilia identifies the cruel act of her husband You told a lie, an odious damned lie// Upon my soul, a lie, a wicked lie
Act 5 Scene 2- Emilia is not longer subdued to her husband I will not charm my tongue; I am bound to speak
Act 5 Scene 2- Emilia ultimately identifies Iago as the villain Villainy, villainy, villainy! I think upon’t, I think- I smell’t- O villainy!
Act 5 Scene 2- Emilia suggests that he can no longer obey her husband let me have leave to speak//’Tis proper I obey him, but not now
Act 5 Scene 2- Emilia continues to abuse Othello Nay, lay thee down and roar,//For thou hast killed the sweetest innocent// That e’er did lift up eye
Act 5 Scene 2- Gratiano suggests that this relationship resulted in the death of Branbantio Thy match was mortal to him
Act 5 Scene 2- Iago abuses his wife and then murders her Villainous *****!…Filth, thou liest…[Iago stabs Emilia from behind and exit]
Act 5 Scene 2- Othello identifies that honesty is better than honour But why should honour outlive honesty?
Act 5 Scene 2- Othello is aware that he will be eternally punished for his actions- religiously This look of thine will hurl my soul from heaven//And fiends will snatch at it…Roast me in sulphur
Act 5 Scene 2- Othello suggests that he can’t kill Iago because he maybe the devil If that thou be’st a devil, I cannot kill thee
Act 5 Scene 2- Othello allows Iago to live as he believes he will suffer more in life I’d have thee live//For in my sense ’tis happiness to die
Act 5 Scene 2- Lodovico highlights Othello’s downfall from nobility O, thou Othello, that was once so good//Fallen in the practice of a damned slave
Act 5 Scene 2- Othello suggests that his fatal flaw was his obsession with honour For nought did I in hate, but all in honour
Act 5 Scene 2- Othello demands answers from Iago I pray, demand that demi-devil//Why he hath thus ensnared my soul and body
Act 5 Scene 2- In an attempt to regain power, Iago refuses to speak at the end of the play Demand me nothing; what you know, you know//From this time forth I never will speak word
Act 5 Scene 2- In his final speech he remain self-assured and proud of his work with the state I have done the state some service and they know’t
Act 5 Scene 2- Othello remains focused on his reputation When you shall these unlucky deed relate//Speak of me as I am
Act 5 Scene 2- Othello identifies his fatal flaw as overwhelming love for Desdemona Of one that loved not wisely, but too well
Act 5 Scene 2- Othello identifies his fatal flaw being too impressionable Of one not easily jealous, but being wrought//Perplexed in the extreme
Act 5 Scene 2- As Othello commits suicide there’s a sense that the conflict between the soldier and husband within him dies as the soldier kills the husband to bring justice I took by the throat the circumsised dog//And smote him thus
Act 5 Scene 2- Othello ultimately loves his wife Killing myself, to die upon a kiss
Act 5 Scene 2- Cassio reveals Othello greatness of soul For he was great of heart
Act 5 Scene 2- Lodovico marks the end of this tragedy Look on the tragic loading of this bed…Myself will straight aboard, and to the state//This heavy act with heavy heart relate
Act 1 Scene 2- Although Othello loves his wife he will not give up his freedom as a soldier to marry her I would not my unhoused free condition//Put into circumscription and confine//For the seas’s worth
Act 1 Scene 3- The first senator reveals the rational analysis of the state which contrasts that of Othello late on in the play This cannot be//By no assay of reason//’Tis pageant To keep us false in gaze
Act 3 Scene 3- Othello suggests he must get rid of all his love for Desdemona but he still regard it highly as he sends it to heaven All my fond love thus do I blow to heaven
Act 3 Scene 3 – Othello declares himself to Iago illustrating his loss of power, Othello’s kneeling mirrors that of Desdemona later in the play In the due reverend of a sacred vow//I here engage my words [he kneels]
Act 3 Scene 3- Iago commands that Othello remains kneeling and he joins Othello illustrating Iago’s growing power Do not rise yet [he kneels]
Act 3 Scene 3- Iago declares himself to Othello and the two rise together illustrating their union in the second half of the palay Let him command,//And to obey shall be in me remorse//What bloody business ever [they rise]
Act 3 Scene 3- Othello’s previous respect and worshiping of his wife has gone Damned he, lewd minx! O, damn her, damn her
Act 3 Scene 3- Iago succeeds in achieving lieutenancy Now art thou my Lieutenant
Act 3 Scene 4- Othello asks for Desdemona’s hand as he attempts for interrogate her, this mirrors palm reading which reflects Othello’s pagan ancestry showing that he is distancing himself from the christian traditions he has adopted Give me your hand. This hand is moist, my lady
Act 3 Scene 4 – Othello discusses the ancestry of the Hankerchief That hankerchief//Did an Egyptian to my mother give:She was a charmer and could almost read the thoughts of people
Act 4 Scene 2- Othello suggests that heaven’s worst punishment is affecting his reputation But alas, to make me//A fixed figure for the time of scorn//To point this slow unmoving finger at

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