The Tragedy of Julius Caesar by William Shakespeare: Act 3.1

Read the excerpt below from act 3.1 of The Tragedy of Julius Caesar and answer the question that follows. ANTONY:Thou art the ruins of the noblest manThat ever livèd in the tide of times.Woe to the hand that shed this costly blood! Mark Antony speaks these lines in an aside after asking Brutus for permission to speak at Caesar’s funeral. How do Mark Antony’s statements relate to the plot of the play? They show a conflict between the conspirators and Mark Antony regarding Caesar’s death.
In the opening of act 3.1, the soothsayer and Artemidorus try to warn Caesar about the assassination. Discuss the role of fate in the play based on Caesar’s reaction to both the soothsayer and Artemidorus. Caesar addresses the soothsayer’s omen by saying that the ides of March have arrived and yet he lives. He ignores the soothsayer’s statement that the day has not fully passed. Artemidorus confronts Caesar three times with his letter, and Caesar ignores him. By not being able to intervene with his letter to save Caesar, Artemidorus cannot stop Caesar’s fate: his assassination. Even though multiple people attempt to intervene, Caesar chooses to ignore them. His assassination is both his own doing and his fate.
Read the excerpt below from act 3.1 The Tragedy of Julius Caesar and complete the instruction that follows.BRUTUS:I kiss thy hand, but not in flattery, Caesar,Desiring thee that Publius Cimber mayHave an immediate freedom of repeal.CAESAR:What, Brutus?Explain the foreshadowing of this excerpt. As the conspirators are trying to persuade Caesar to pardon Publius Cimber, Caesar is surprised that Brutus is speaking with them. This foreshadows the fact that Brutus is also acting with them in the assassination of Caesar. It is when Caesar discovers this ultimate betrayal that he gives up fighting and dies.
2 3 4 5 7 8 9 10Read the excerpt below from The Tragedy of Julius Caesar and answer the question that follows.BRUTUS:What said Popillius Laena?CASSIUS:He wished today our enterprise might thrive.I fear our purpose is discoverèd.BRUTUS:Look how he makes to Caesar. Mark him.CASSIUS:Casca, be sudden, for we fear prevention.—Brutus, what shall be done? If this be known,Cassius or Caesar never shall turn back,For I will slay myself.BRUTUS:Cassius, be constant.Popillius Laena speaks not of our purposes,For look, he smiles, and Caeser doth not change.CASSIUS:Trebonius knows his time, for look you, Brutus,He draws Mark Antony out of the way.DECIUS:Where is Metullus Cimber? . . .BRUTUS:He is addressed1. Press near, and second him.CINNA:Casca, you are the first that rears your hand1.already with CaesarIn these lines from act 3.1, the conspirators are preparing to carry out their assassination plot. How does the dialogue between these characters reflect their emotions? The short, quick exchanges suggest their urgency and anxiety about the plan.
Which statement regarding Caesar’s assassination is what Brutus believes to be true?–It is a disgrace for the Roman Republic because Caesar was such a good leader.–It is a sacrifice for the good of Brutus because now he and Cassius can take control of the Roman Republic.–It is a sacrifice for the Roman Republic because now Mark Antony can take control.–It is a sacrifice for the good of the Roman Republic because it eliminates a tyrant. It is a sacrifice for the good of the Roman Republic because it eliminates a tyrant.
Read the excerpt below from The Tragedy of Julius Caesar and answer the question that follows.CAESAR:I could be well moved if I were as you.If I could pray to move, prayers would move me.But I am constant as a Northern Star,Of whose true fixed and resting qualityThere is no fellow in the firmament . . . .So in the world: ’tis furnished well with men,And men are flesh and blood, and apprehensive;Yet in the number I do know but oneThat unassailable holds on his rank,Unshaked of motion; and that I am he . . . .How does Caesar’s description of himself support or conflict with his past behaviors with other characters? Caesar describes himself as “constant as a Northern Star,” meaning that he is reliable and consistent. He believes that he is the guiding light of Rome and his leadership is necessary. Yet, the audience notices from his interactions with Calpurnia and Decius that he is greatly affected by flattery. He changes his mind on a whim but especially if it will garner him more praise.
Why does Cassius not want Mark Antony to have the opportunity to speak at Caesar’s funeral? Why does Brutus allow it anyway? Cassius does not trust Mark Antony, and he feels that Antony is going to use this opportunity to turn the people against them. Brutus is willing to allow it because he feels it will show that they are not evil, that they want a strong future for Rome, and that they want everyone to come together.
Caesar utters, “Et tu, Brute?” or “And you, too, Brutus?” when Brutus stabs him in the Senate. Based on what you learned about the relationship between Caesar and Brutus, explain Caesar’s reaction to Brutus’ action. Caesar’s reaction singles out Brutus due to the magnitude of his betrayal. Caesar dearly loved Brutus and promoted him within the government; he didn’t suspect him of such treachery. His reaction shows surprise followed by resignation that the time of his reign is over and he should die.
How did the conspirators Trebonius, Decius, Cassius, and Brutus attain their military and government positions?–They held military positions but were not in the Senate.–They were all helped and promoted by Caesar.–They were not in the military or the Senate.–They worked hard and had no interaction with Caesar to help promote them. They were all helped and promoted by Caesar.
How do the tensions among the characters of the play also reflect the themes of The Tragedy of Julius Caesar? The Tragedy of Julius Caesar deals with the themes of fate, betrayal, and honor, among others. The chief conflict of the play centers on the conspirators’ hatred of Julius Caesar’s increasing power, which could lead to his becoming king and to the dissolution of the Republic. This tension is about power, one of the play’s themes. Also, the men who will assassinate Caesar are his friends, and the play explores the limits of that bond as it is tested by ambition and power.
What is the Roman crowd’s reaction to Caesar’s assassination?Fearful: they hide in their homes.Joyful: the streets burst into celebration.Appreciative: the crowd immediately appoints Brutus as the new leader.Vengeful: the crowd immediately attacks the conspirators. Fearful: they hide in their homes.
Which conspirator is the last to stab Caesar?–Cassius–Casca–Trebonius–Brutus Brutus
Which tension between characters reflects the theme of ambition in The Tragedy of Julius Caesar?–the tension between Caesar and Cassius–the tension between Artemidorus and the soothsayer–the tension between Calpurnia and Artemidorus–the tension between the soothsayer and Calpurnia the tension between Caesar and Cassius
Which outcome is not a result of the events of act 3.1 of The Tragedy of Julius Caesar?–Julius Caesar is assassinated.–Rome is left without a leader.–The Roman people are frightened by the conspirators’ actions.–Julius Caesar is crowned the dictator. Julius Caesar is crowned the dictator.
Read the excerpt below from act 3.1 of The Tragedy of Julius Caesar and answer the question that follows.CAESAR:I could be well moved if I were as you.If I could pray to move, prayers would move me.But I am constant as the Northern Star,Of whose true fixed and resting qualityThere is no fellow in the firmament . . . .So in the world: ’tis furnished well with men,And men are flesh and blood, and apprehensive;Yet in the number I do know but oneThat unassailable holds on his rank,Unshaked of motion; and that I am he . . . .How does Shakespeare’s use of the specific simile “I am constant as the Northern Star” support the statements he makes in the rest of his speech?—Caesar says that he’s constant like the Northern Star but that he can change his mind depending on what other men say or do.—Caesar says that he is never set like the Northern Star, but instead, he likes to change his mind and actions just like other men do.—Caesar says that he’s as constant as the Northern Star set in the sky, and he talks about the ways he differs from other men by being constant.—Caesar says that he’s not set like the Northern Star, and he talks about the ways he is like other men by being constant. Caesar says that he’s as constant as the Northern Star set in the sky, and he talks about the ways he differs from other men by being constant.
Read the plot points below from The Tragedy of Julius Caesar and answer the question that follows.The crowd’s reaction to the conspirator’s actionsMark Antony’s request to speak at Caesar’s funeralHow do these events contribute to the plot of the play?—The conspirators are not supported by the crowd or Mark Antony, which will cause further problems to be resolved.—Mark Antony wants to help the conspirators calm the Roman crowd, which will resolve the conflicts of the play.—Brutus requests that Mark Antony speak at the funeral, which will resolve the conflicts of the play.—Brutus and Mark Antony agree to bury Caesar without a funeral, which will cause more problems to be resolved. The conspirators are not supported by the crowd or Mark Antony, which will cause further problems to be resolved.
Who has Caesar named as his heir?—Brutus—Cassius—Octavius—Antony Octavius
What type of bond exists between Julius Caesar and Brutus?—hatred—mutual distrust—friendship—struggle for power friendship
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10Read the excerpt below from act 3.1 of The Tragedy of Julius Caesar and answer the question that follows.BRUTUS:Why I, that did love Caesar when I struck him,How does this line, which defends Brutus’ actions, relate to the rest of the play?—Brutus’ dislike for Caesar combined with Caesar’s quest for power is the reason for Caesar’s assassination, which Brutus stated in act 2.—Brutus’ love for Caesar could not override the necessity of Caesar’s death, which Brutus has stated since act 2.—Brutus loved Caesar, but he killed him anyway and for no real reason.—Brutus was jealous of Caesar and killed him in order to take over as leader of Rome. Brutus’ love for Caesar could not override the necessity of Caesar’s death, which Brutus has stated since act 2.
Which statement is true?—Cassius’ desire for fame and Brutus’ patriotism for Rome is the central conflict of the play and reflects the theme of publicity. —Caesar’s increasing power and the conspirators’ fear of tyranny is the central conflict of the play and reflects the theme of ambition.—Calpurnia and Caesar’s marriage is the central conflict of the play and reflects the theme of misconception.—Portia and Brutus’ marriage is the central theme of the play and reflects the theme of honor. Caesar’s increasing power and the conspirators’ fear of tyranny is the central conflict of the play and reflects the theme of ambition.

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