The Tragedy of Julius Caesar by William Shakespeare: Act 2

Read the excerpt below from act 2.1 of The Tragedy of Julius Caesar and answer the question that follows.BRUTUS:It must be by his death. And for my partI know no personal cause to spurn at him,But for the general. He would be crowned.How that might change his nature, there’s the question.It is the bright day that brings forth the adder,And that craves wary walking. Crown him: that!And then I grant we put a sting in himThat at his will he may do danger with.Th’ abuse of greatness is when it disjoinsRemorse from power. And to speak truth of CaesarI have not known when his affections swayedMore than his reason. But ’tis a common proof That lowliness is young ambition’s ladder,Whereto the climber-upward turns his face;But when he once attains the upmost round,He then unto the ladder turns his back,Looks in the clouds, scorning the base degreesBy which he did ascend. So Caesar may.Then lest he may, prevent. And since the quarrelWill bear no color for the thing he is,Fashion it thus: that when he is, augmented,Would run to these and these extremities;And therefore think him as a serpent’s egg.Which, hatched, would as his kind grow mischievous,And kill him in the shell.What is revealed about Brutus’ character and motivations in the moral dilemma presented in his act 2.1 soliloquy? Brutus’ act 2.1 soliloquy reveals the flawed reasoning that he’s using to defend the assassination plot. He assumes that Caesar’s growing power will result in forming a tyrant, but Brutus already considers Caesar a tyrant. He is struggling to find just cause or at least an honorable reason to undertake such a heinous act. He concludes that it is for the good of Rome.
Read the excerpt below from act 2.2 in The Tragedy of Julius Caesar and complete the instruction that follows.CAESAR:Danger knows full wellThat Caesar is more dangerous than he.We are two lions littered in one day,And I the elder and more terrible.Identify the correct interpretation of the figurative language used in this excerpt. Caesar personifies danger to create a metaphor comparing himself and it to brother lions: both noble and strong, with Caesar being stronger because he is the older of the two.
Which phrase defines “apostrophe” best? a direct address to an inanimate object or deceased person as if it could respond
Read the excerpt below from act 2.1 of The Tragedy of Julius Caesar and answer the question that follows.BRUTUS:O then by dayWhere wilt thou find a cavern dark enoughTo mask thy monstrous visage? Seek none, conspiracy.Hide it in smiles and affability.Which line is an example of apostrophe? “Seek none, conspiracy.”
Which phrase defines “personification” best? giving human qualities to an idea or an inanimate object
Read the excerpt below from act 2.1 of The Tragedy of Julius Caesar and answer the question that follows.CASSIUS:Let Antony and Caesar fall together. . . .BRUTUS:Our course will seem too bloody, Caius Cassius . . . .Let us be sacrificers, but not butchers, Caius. Brutus believes the assassination is a noble act: a necessary sacrifice for the good of Rome.
What is not one of the purposes of Brutus’ soliloquy in act 2.1 of The Tragedy of Julius Caesar? to show his relationship with his wife, Portia
Read the excerpt below from act 2.1 of The Tragedy of Julius Caesar and answer the question that follows.BRUTUS:And therefore think him as a serpent’s eggWhich, hatched, would as his kind grow mischievous,And kill him in the shell. Based on the bolded simile, what is Brutus’ reason for assassinating Caesar? By comparing Caesar to “a serpent’s egg,” he suggests the characteristics of a serpent are part of Caesar’s personality. Uncertain of the reaction Caesar would have to increased power, Brutus suggests that it would do more harm than good. Because a serpent can not only poison any enemies but also swallow its prey whole, the metaphor suggests that Brutus wants to prevent such a beast from ever being hatched: “kill him in his shell.”
Read the excerpt below from act 2.1 of The Tragedy of Julius Caesar and complete the instruction that follows. BRUTUS:O then by dayWhere wilt thou find a cavern dark enoughTo mask thy monstrous visage? Seek none, conspiracy.Hide it in smiles and affability.Identify the figurative language used in this example. personification: “mask thy monstrous visage”
Read the excerpt below from act 2.2 of The Tragedy of Julius Caesar and answer the question that follows.CAESAR:What can be avoidedWhose end is purposed by the mighty gods?Yet Caesar shall go forth, for these predictionsAre to the world in general as to Caesar.What does this excerpt reveal about Caesar’s attitude regarding the forewarnings of his death? Caesar ignores the forewarnings of his death because if it is his fate, he can’t defeat the gods.
In act 2.1 of The Tragedy of Julius Caesar, why do the conspirators not swear an oath? Brutus thinks that honest men will follow through on their intentions; therefore, they do not need to swear an oath.
Read the excerpt below from act 2.3 of The Tragedy of Julius Caesar and answer the question that follows.ARTEMIDORUS:”Caesar, beware of Brutus. Take heed of Cassius.Come not near Casca. Have an eye to Cinna. . . .There is but one mind in all these men, and it isbent against Caesar. If thou beest not immortal,look about you. Security gives way to conspiracy. Themighty gods defend thee! Thy lover, Artemidorus.”What does this excerpt reveal about Artemidorus’ motivations regarding the assassination plot against Julius Caesar? Artemidorus wants to warn Caesar about the conspiracy against him.
Read the excerpt below from act 2.2 of The Tragedy of Julius Caesar and answer the question that follows.CAESAR:Cowards die many times before their deaths;The valiant never taste of death but once.Of all the wonders that I yet have heard,It seems to me most strange that men should fear,Seeing that death, a necessary end,Will come when it will come.What does this excerpt reveal about Caesar’s attitude toward death? Caesar thinks that the valiant bravely face death, which should not be prevented or feared.
Read the excerpt below from act 2.1 of The Tragedy of Julius Caesar and answer the question that follows. BRUTUS:O then by dayWhere wilt thou find a cavern dark enoughTo mask thy monstrous visage? Seek none, conspiracy.Hide it in smiles and affability. Which form of figurative language is used in the bold lines of the above example? personification
Which quotation from act 1.3 in The Tragedy of Julius Caesar is the best example of foreshadowing? CASSIUS:That heaven hath infused them with these spiritsTo make them instruments of fear and warningUnto some monstrous state.
Which statement about tragedy is true? Tragedy exposes negative emotions and fears.
Standing in the toy store, Holly spotted a vintage Barbie and had a memory of playing with her best friend in her basement. The __________ was so true-to-life, she thought she was eight years old again. flashback
Which paragraph summarizes Julius Caesar’s life best? Julius Caesar was born into a powerful family. He became a successful military general and politician, eventually becoming dictator of Rome. He was assassinated in 44 BCE.
Julius Caesar and Queen Elizabeth I were often considered __________, leaders who worked to seize absolute power. tyrants
Which phrase defines “apostrophe” best? a direct address to an inanimate object or deceased person as if it could respond
Molly wonders if she should cheat on the test to pass the class or if she should risk failing because she knows she hasn’t really learned the material. Which issue does Molly face? moral dilemma
Describe the characteristics of a tragic hero. The tragic hero possesses the following characteristics:1. The hero is virtuous and of high status, or noble character.2. The hero is relatable to the audience (i.e., flawed).3. The hero must possess “hamartia,” or a tragic flaw that contributes to the downfall. A common tragic flaw is “hubris,” or excessive pride.4. The hero’s downfall leads to “recognition,” or a new understanding that had formerly been overlooked.
Read the excerpt below from act 2.1 of The Tragedy of Julius Caesar and answer the question that follows.BRUTUS:And therefore think him as a serpent’s eggWhich, hatched, would as his kind grow mischievous,And kill him in the shell.Based on the bolded simile, what is Brutus’ reason for assassinating Caesar? By comparing Caesar to “a serpent’s egg,” he suggests the characteristics of a serpent are part of Caesar’s personality. Uncertain of the reaction Caesar would have to increased power, Brutus suggests that it would do more harm than good. Because a serpent can not only poison any enemies but also swallow its prey whole, the metaphor suggests that Brutus wants to prevent such a beast from ever being hatched: “kill him in his shell.”
Which stage direction tells a character to leave the stage? Exeunt CAESAR and his train
Read the excerpt below from act 2.1 of The Tragedy of Julius Caesar and answer the question that follows.CASSIUS:Let Antony and Caesar fall together. . . .BRUTUS:Our course will seem too bloody, Caius Cassius . . . .Let us be sacrificers, but not butchers, Caius. What does this interaction between Cassius and Brutus reveal about Brutus’ motivations? Brutus believes the assassination is a noble act: a necessary sacrifice for the good of Rome.
How has the scene and atmosphere around the Forum changed from the opening of act 1 to its close? Act 1 opens with the Forum in celebration and ends with it in chaos.
11 13 14 15Read the excerpt below from act 2.4 of The Tragedy of Julius Caesar and answer the question that follows.PORTIA:Is Caesar yet gone to the Capitol?Soothsayer:Madam, not yet. I go to take my standTo see him pass on to the Capitol.PORTIA:Thou hast some suit to Caesar, hast thou not?Soothsayer:That I have, lady. If it will please CaesarTo be so good to Caesar as to hear me,I shall beseech him to befriend himself.PORTIA:Why? Know’st thou any harm’s intended towards him?Soothsayer:None that I know will be; much that I fear may chance. . . . I’ll get me to a place more void, and thereSpeak to great Caesar as he comes along. . . .PORTIA:O Brutus,The heavens speed thee in thine enterprise!What does this interaction reveal about each character’s motives? In this character interaction, the two characters have warring motivations. The soothsayer wants to warn Caesar again; this is evidenced by his statements, “I shall beseech him to befriend himself,” meaning to protect himself. When he says, “I’ll get me to a place more void and there/Speak to great Caesar as he comes along,” we find that the soothsayer wants to get Caesar alone, probably because he doesn’t know who around him can be trusted. Conversely, Portia wants Brutus to succeed in his assassination of Caesar. When the soothsayer tells her he is going to warn Caesar to protect himself she replies, “Why? Know’st thou any harm’s intended towards him?” in an effort to find out what he knows. By her lines “O Brutus,/The heavens speed thee in thine enterprise!” we see that she wants him to hurry and commit the act before Caesar can be warned.
Which social change did Caesar not put into place? Senate benefits
11 13 14 15Read the excerpt below from act 2.1 of The Tragedy of Julius Caesar and answer the question that follows.BRUTUS:It must be by his death. And for my partI know no personal cause to spurn at him,But for the general. He would be crowned.How that might change his nature, there’s the question.It is the bright day that brings forth the adder,And that craves wary walking. Crown him: that!And then I grant we put a sting in himThat at his will he may do danger with.Th’ abuse of greatness is when it disjoinsRemorse from power. And to speak truth of CaesarI have not known when his affections swayedMore than his reason. But ’tis a common proof That lowliness is young ambition’s ladder,Whereto the climber-upward turns his face;But when he once attains the upmost round,He then unto the ladder turns his back,Looks in the clouds, scorning the base degreesBy which he did ascend. So Caesar may.Then lest he may, prevent. And since the quarrelWill bear no color for the thing he is,Fashion it thus: that when he is, augmented,Would run to these and these extremities;And therefore think him as a serpent’s egg.Which, hatched, would as his kind grow mischievous,And kill him in the shell.What is revealed about Brutus’ character and motivations in the moral dilemma presented in his act 2.1 soliloquy? Brutus’ act 2.1 soliloquy reveals the flawed reasoning that he’s using to defend the assassination plot. He assumes that Caesar’s growing power will result in forming a tyrant, but Brutus already considers Caesar a tyrant. He is struggling to find just cause or at least an honorable reason to undertake such a heinous act. He concludes that it is for the good of Rome.

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