STAAR ELA II Reporting Category 1 – The Tragedy of Julius Caesar by William Shakespeare: Act 1

How has the scene and atmosphere around the Forum changed from the opening of act 1 to its close?The Forum does not change from the opening to the close of the play.Act 1 opens with the Forum in celebration and ends with it in chaos.Act 1 opens with the Forum in chaos and closes with it in celebration.Act 1 opens with the Forum saddened by the Feast of Lupercal and closes with the citizens still saddened because of the thunderstorm. Act 1 opens with the Forum in celebration and ends with it in chaos.
What is not an example of conflict in The Tragedy of Julius Caesar?powersymbolismclassfriendship symbolism
Read the excerpt below from act 1.2 of The Tragedy of Julius Caesar and complete the instruction that follows.CASCA:Why, there was a crown offered him; and beingoffered him, he put it by with the back of his hand,thus; and then the people fell a-shouting.Paraphrase the above section of the text. Responses may vary but should include some or all of the following information:A crown was offered to Caesar, he pushed it away with the back of his hand like this, and the people started shouting.
Read the excerpt below from act 1.3 of The Tragedy of Julius Caesar and answer the question that follows.CASCA:A common slave—you know him well by sight—Held up his left hand, which did flame and burnLike twenty torches joined; and yet his hand,Not sensible of fire, remained unscorched. . . . And there were drawnUpon a heap a hundred ghastly women,Transformèd with their fear, who swore they saw Men all in fire walk up and down the streets.And yesterday the bird of night did sitEven at noonday upon the market-place,Hooting and shrieking. . . . For I believe they are portentous thingsUnto the climate that they point upon.Read the excerpt below from act 1.3 of The Tragedy of Julius Caesar and answer the question that follows.CASCA:A common slave—you know him well by sight—Held up his left hand, which did flame and burnLike twenty torches joined; and yet his hand,Not sensible of fire, remained unscorched. . . . And there were drawnUpon a heap a hundred ghastly women,Transformèd with their fear, who swore they saw Men all in fire walk up and down the streets.And yesterday the bird of night did sitEven at noonday upon the market-place,Hooting and shrieking. . . . For I believe they are portentous thingsUnto the climate that they point upon.What is the meaning of the symbol “the bird of night” as indicated in the excerpt above? The night bird is a caged animal roaming free, symbolizing the conspirators wanting to roam free as well.The night bird is shrieking, symbolizing a warning to Caesar.The night bird appears at noon, symbolizing that Rome has a darkness hanging over it.The night bird symbolizes the hope that light will dispel the darkness of Rome. The night bird appears at noon, symbolizing that Rome has a darkness hanging over it.
Read the excerpt below from act 1.2 of The Tragedy of Julius Caesar and complete the instruction that follows.CASSIUS:Why, man, he doth bestride the narrow worldLike a Colossus, and we petty menWalk under his huge legs, and peep about To find ourselves dishonorable graves.Men at sometime were masters of their fates.The fault, dear Brutus, is not in our stars,But in ourselves, that we are underlings.Identify the type of imagery used and explain its meaning. Responses may vary but should include some or all of the following information:This excerpt is an example of sight imagery. The image created is that of Caesar as a colossal man who towers above everyone else. Other people have nothing to look forward to but dying as slaves to Caesar. In the past, people could control their own fate. Unfortunately, since they had given so much power to Caesar, they destroyed their own ability to control their lives and their future.
Which character is willing to deceive his friends for his own ambition?BrutusAntonyCassiusFlavius Cassius
Explain the differences between patricians and plebeians. Responses may vary but should include some or all of the following information:The patricians and plebeians were the two social classes in ancient Rome. Patricians were wealthy and often inherited their positions in government institutions, namely the Senate. Plebeians, were the poor and working class, which included servants and tradesmen. Only in later years of the Republic did they gain Senate seats.
Read the excerpt below from act 1.2 of The Tragedy of Julius Caesar and answer the question that follows.BRUTUS:What a blunt fellow is this grown to be!He was quick mettle when he went to school.blunt – adj. Not smart.mettle – n. Wit; intelligence.Which statement paraphrases this excerpt best?This guy is really smart, just like he was when he was in school!This man has gone to blacksmith school and has become very dull.This man has gone to school but should not have done because he is just a blacksmith.This man, who was smart in school, has grown up to be unintelligent. This man, who was smart in school, has grown up to be unintelligent.
Read the excerpt below from act 1.1 of The Tragedy of Julius Caesar and answer the question that follows.Cobbler:Nay, I beseech you, sir, be not out with me. Yet, if you be outsir, I can mend you.MURELLUS:What meanest thou by that? “Mend” me, thou saucy fellow?Cobbler:Why, sir, cobble you.MURELLUS:Thou art a cobbler, art thou?In this example, “mend” means “to fix,” but the cobbler uses it in a way that gives it a double meaning. Based on this interaction, what are the two ways that the cobbler can “mend” Murellus? Responses may vary but should include some or all of the following information:Cobbler uses “mend” to connect his profession with his interaction with Murellus. Literally, as a cobbler, his job is to mend, or fix, shoes, a service he offers Murellus. However, he really means to “fix” him or to beat him up, to straighten out his thinking. We still actually use this term to “fix” someone as a slang term: to straighten someone out who disagrees with us. Furthermore, the plebeian and the patrician are in a conflict when this play opens, and Murellus is angry that the plebeians are celebrating. The cobbler offers his services to help “mend” or fix Murellus’ anger.
Read the excerpt below from act 1.2 of The Tragedy of Julius Caesar and complete the instruction that follows.CASCA:Why, there was a crown offered him; and beingoffered him, he put it by with the back of his hand,thus; and then the people fell a-shouting.BRUTUS:What was the second noise for?CASCA:Why, for that too.CASSIUS:They shouted thrice. What was the last cry for?CASCA:Why, for that too.BRUTUS:Was the crown offered him thrice?CASCA:Ay, marry, was’t; and he put it by thrice, everytime gentler than other; and at every putting by,mine honest neighbors shouted.put it by – v. Turned it down; refused it.thrice – adv. Three times.marry – adv. Indeed.Summarize the events of the excerpt above. Responses may vary but should include some or all of the following information:Casca, Brutus, and Cassius discuss Caesar’s three refusals of a crown offered to him and the crowd’s cheers for him to accept it.

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