Setting the Scene of Romeo and Juliet, Part 2

An inference is a conclusion that adds what you know to the _____ in the text information
Read the excerpt from Act I, scene i of Romeo and Juliet.So early walking did I see your son:Towards him I made; but he was ware of me, 110And stole into the covert of the wood:I, measuring his affections by my own,That most are busied when they’re most alone,Pursu’d my humour not pursuing his,And gladly shunn’d who gladly fled from me.What stops Benvolio from approaching Romeo? Benvolio noticed that Romeo purposely hid from him.
Read the excerpt from Act I, scene i of Romeo and Juliet.Benvolio: Here were the servants of your adversaryAnd yours close fighting ere I did approach:I drew to part them; in the instant cameThe fiery Tybalt, with his sword prepar’d, 95Which, as he breath’d defiance to my ears,He swung about his head, and cut the winds,Who, nothing hurt withal hiss’d him in scorn.According to Benvolio, who caused the fight? the servants of both houses
Read the excerpt from Act I, scene ii of Romeo and Juliet.Benvolio: At this same ancient feast of Capulet’s, 70Sups the fair Rosaline, whom thou so lov’st,With all the admired beauties of Verona:Go thither; and, with unattainted eyeCompare her face with some that I shall show,And I will make thee think thy swan a crow.Which is the best paraphrase of Benvolio’s lines? Once you see other beautiful girls at the party, you will see that Rosaline is not so special.
Read the excerpt from Act I, scene i of Romeo and Juliet.Tybalt: What! art thou drawn among these heartless hinds?Turn thee, Benvolio, look upon thy death.Benvolio: I do but keep the peace: put up thy sword, 50Or manage it to part these men with me.Tybalt: What! drawn, and talk of peace? I hate the word,As I hate hell, all Montagues, and thee.Have at thee, coward! [They fight.]What inference can be made about Benvolio and Tybalt from this dialogue? Benvolio is more concerned with keeping the peace than Tybalt is.
Read the excerpt from Act I, scene i of Romeo and Juliet.Montague: Many a morning hath he there been seen,With tears augmenting the fresh morning’s dew,Adding to clouds more clouds with his deep sighs:But all so soon as the all-cheering sunShould in the furthest east begin to draw 120The shady curtains from Aurora’s bed,Away from light steals home my heavy son,And private in his chamber pens himself,Shuts up his windows, locks fair daylight out,And makes himself an artificial night.According to this excerpt, what is causing Montague’s concerns about Romeo? Romeo has been crying and shutting himself away in his darkened room.
Read the excerpt from Act I, scene i of Romeo and Juliet.Romeo: Alas! that love, whose view is muffled still,Should, without eyes, see pathways to his will. 160Where shall we dine? O me! What fray was here?Yet tell me not, for I have heard it all.Here’s much to do with hate, but more with love:Why then, O brawling love! O loving hate!O any thing! of nothing first create. 165O heavy lightness! serious vanity!Mis-shapen chaos of well-seeming forms!Feather of lead, bright smoke, cold fire, sick health!Still-waking sleep, that is not what it is!This love feel I, that feel no love in this. Dost thou not laugh? O heavy lightness! serious vanity!Mis-shapen chaos of well-seeming forms!Feather of lead, bright smoke, cold fire, sick health!
Read the excerpt from Act I, scene i of Romeo and Juliet.Benvolio: Groan! why, no;But sadly tell me who.Romeo: Bid a sick man in sadness make his will;Ah! word ill urg’d to one that is so ill. 195In sadness, cousin, I do love a woman.What is the cause of Romeo’s despair? Romeo is in love with a woman.
Read the excerpt from Act I, scene i of Romeo and Juliet.Montague: Many a morning hath he there been seen,With tears augmenting the fresh morning’s dew,Adding to clouds more clouds with his deep sighs:But all so soon as the all-cheering sunShould in the furthest east begin to draw 120The shady curtains from Aurora’s bed,Away from light steals home my heavy son,And private in his chamber pens himself,Shuts up his windows, locks fair daylight out,And makes himself an artificial night. 125Black and portentous must this humour proveUnless good counsel may the cause remove.What inference can be made about Montague from this dialogue? He is very concerned about Romeo.
Read the excerpt from Act I, scene i of Romeo and Juliet.Capulet: What noise is this? Give me my long sword, ho!Lady Capulet: A crutch, a crutch! Why call you for a sword?60Capulet: My sword, I say! Old Montague is come,And flourishes his blade in spite of me.Enter MONTAGUE and LADY MONTAGUE.Montague: Thou villain Capulet! Hold me not; let me go.Lady Montague: Thou shalt not stir one foot to seek a foe.65What inference can be made about Lady Capulet and Lady Montague from this dialogue? They are more concerned with keeping the peace than their husbands are.

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