Romeo and Juliette

I will withdraw; but this intrusion shall Now seeming sweet, convert to bitt’rest gall. Tybalt vows to seek revenge
If I profane with my unworthiest hand This holy shrine Romeo describes Juliet in religious terms
O dear account. My life is my foe’s debt. Romeo discovers that Juliet is a Capulet
My only love sprung from my only hate. Juliet discovers that Romeo is a Montague
So shows a snowy dove trooping with crows Light and dark imagery
I hate the word, as I hate Hell, all Montagues and thee Tybalt is first presented as agressive
A pair of star-cross’d lovers take their life Theme of fate is introduced (A pair)
Did my heart love till now? Forswear it, sight. For I ne’er saw true beauty till this night Romeo denies loving Rosaline
Be but sworn my love and I’ll no longer be a Capulet Juliet is willing to give up her family for Romeo
This day’s black fate on mo days doth depend: This but begins the woe others must end. Romeo knows killing Tybalt will cause repurcussions
It was the nightingale and not the lark That pierc’d the fearful hollow of thine ear Juliet pretends it is day so she and Romeo need not be parted
Methinks I see thee, now thou art so low, As one dead in the bottom of a tomb In Act IV Juliet has a premonition of Romeo’s death
I would the fool were married to her grave Lady Capulet has no sympathy for Juliet
My dismal scene I needs must act alone. Juliet’s loneliness as she takes the potion
I dreamt my lady came and found me dead Romeo tells Balthasar what he has dreamt
Shake the yoke of inauspicious stars From this world-wearied flesh Romeo wishes to be free from his body and from the influence of hostile stars
O happy dagger This is thy sheath. Juliette wants to die
a scourge is laid upon your hate Prince Escalus feels that the families have brought the tragedy on themselves
Why then, O brawling love, O loving hate, O anything of nothing first (create!) O heavy lightness, serious vanity , Misshapen chaos of (well – seeming) forms, feather of lead, bright smoke, cold fire, sick health, Still – waking sleep that is not what it is! This love feel I, that feel no Love in this.Dost thou not laugh? Romeo is speaking to Benvolio
What say you? can you love the gentleman? this night you shall behold him at our feast, read o’er the volume of your Paris’ face and find delight writ there with beauty’s pen Examine every married ligament and see how one another lends content, and what obscured in this fair volume lies find written In the margent of his eyes. Lady Capulet speaking to Juliette
And too soon marred are those so early made. Earth hath swallowed all my hopes but she; She’s the hopeful lady of my Earth. But woo her, gentle Paris get her heart; My will to her consent is but a part. Capulet speaking to Paris
Tut, you saw her fair, none else being by, Herself poised with herself in either eye; but in that crystal scale let there be weighed your lady’s love against some other maid That I will show you shining at this feast, And she shall scant show well that now seems best Benvolio to Romeo
Find them out whose names are written here! it is written that the shoemaker should meddle with his yard and the tailor with his last, the fisher with his pencil ad the painter with his nets. But I am sent to find those persons whose names are here writ, and can never find what names the writing person hath here writ. I must to the learned. In good time! Peter Is talking about the list for the Capulets feast
Romeo The son and heir of Montague and Lady Montague. A young man of about sixteen, Romeo is handsome, intelligent, and sensitive. Though impulsive and immature, his idealism and passion make him an extremely likable character. He lives in the middle of a violent feud between his family and the Capulets, but he is not at all interested in violence. His only interest is love. At the beginning of the play he is madly in love with a woman named Rosaline, but the instant he lays eyes on Juliet, he falls in love with her and forgets Rosaline. Thus, Shakespeare gives us every reason to question how real Romeo’s new love is, but Romeo goes to extremes to prove the seriousness of his feelings. He secretly marries Juliet, the daughter of his father’s worst enemy; he happily takes abuse from Tybalt; and he would rather die than live without his beloved. Romeo is also an affectionate and devoted friend to his relative Benvolio, Mercutio, and Friar Lawrence.
Juliette The daughter of Capulet and Lady Capulet. A beautiful thirteen-year-old girl, Juliet begins the play as a na├»ve child who has thought little about love and marriage, but she grows up quickly upon falling in love with Romeo, the son of her family’s great enemy. Because she is a girl in an aristocratic family, she has none of the freedom Romeo has to roam around the city, climb over walls in the middle of the night, or get into swordfights. Nevertheless, she shows amazing courage in trusting her entire life and future to Romeo, even refusing to believe the worst reports about him after he gets involved in a fight with her cousin. Juliet’s closest friend and confidant is her nurse, though she’s willing to shut the Nurse out of her life the moment the Nurse turns against Romeo.
Friar Lawrence A Franciscan friar, friend to both Romeo and Juliet. Kind, civic-minded, a proponent of moderation, and always ready with a plan, Friar Lawrence secretly marries the impassioned lovers in hopes that the union might eventually bring peace to Verona. As well as being a Catholic holy man, Friar Lawrence is also an expert in the use of seemingly mystical potions and herbs.
Mercutio A kinsman to the Prince, and Romeo’s close friend. One of the most extraordinary characters in all of Shakespeare’s plays, Mercutio overflows with imagination, wit, and, at times, a strange, biting satire and brooding fervor. Mercutio loves wordplay, especially sexual double entendres. He can be quite hotheaded, and hates people who are affected, pretentious, or obsessed with the latest fashions. He finds Romeo’s romanticized ideas about love tiresome, and tries to convince Romeo to view love as a simple matter of sexual appetite.
The Nurse Juliet’s nurse, the woman who breast-fed Juliet when she was a baby and has cared for Juliet her entire life. A vulgar, long-winded, and sentimental character, the Nurse provides comic relief with her frequently inappropriate remarks and speeches. But, until a disagreement near the play’s end, the Nurse is Juliet’s faithful confidante and loyal intermediary in Juliet’s affair with Romeo. She provides a contrast with Juliet, given that her view of love is earthy and sexual, whereas Juliet is idealistic and intense. The Nurse believes in love and wants Juliet to have a nice-looking husband, but the idea that Juliet would want to sacrifice herself for love is incomprehensible to her.
Tybalt A Capulet, Juliet’s cousin on her mother’s side. Vain, fashionable, supremely aware of courtesy and the lack of it, he becomes aggressive, violent, and quick to draw his sword when he feels his pride has been injured. Once drawn, his sword is something to be feared. He loathes Montagues
Capulet The patriarch of the Capulet family, father of Juliet, husband of Lady Capulet, and enemy, for unexplained reasons, of Montague. He truly loves his daughter, though he is not well acquainted with Juliet’s thoughts or feelings, and seems to think that what is best for her is a “good” match with Paris. Often prudent, he commands respect and propriety, but he is liable to fly into a rage when either is lacking.
Lady Capulet Juliet’s mother, Capulet’s wife. A woman who herself married young (by her own estimation she gave birth to Juliet at close to the age of fourteen), she is eager to see her daughter marry Paris. She is an ineffectual mother, relying on the Nurse for moral and pragmatic support.
Montague Romeo’s father, the patriarch of the Montague clan and bitter enemy of Capulet. At the beginning of the play, he is chiefly concerned about Romeo’s melancholy.
Lady Montague Romeo’s mother, Montague’s wife. She dies of grief after Romeo is exiled from Verona.
Paris A kinsman of the Prince, and the suitor of Juliet most preferred by Capulet. Once Capulet has promised him he can marry Juliet, he behaves very presumptuous toward her, acting as if they are already married.
Benvolio Montague’s nephew, Romeo’s cousin and thoughtful friend, he makes a genuine effort to defuse violent scenes in public places, though Mercutio accuses him of having a nasty temper in private. He spends most of the play trying to help Romeo get his mind off Rosaline, even after Romeo has fallen in love with Juliet.
Prince Escalus The Prince of Verona. A kinsman of Mercutio and Paris. As the seat of political power in Verona, he is concerned about maintaining the public peace at all costs.
Friar John A Franciscan friar charged by Friar Lawrence with taking the news of Juliet’s false death to Romeo in Mantua. Friar John is held up in a quarantined house, and the message never reaches Romeo.
Balthasar Romeo’s dedicated servant, who brings Romeo the news of Juliet’s death, unaware that her death is a ruse.
Sampson and Gregory Two servants of the house of Capulet, who, like their master, hate the Montagues. At the outset of the play, they successfully provoke some Montague men into a fight.
Abram Montague’s servant, who fights with Sampson and Gregory in the first scene of the play.
The apothecary An apothecary in Mantua. Had he been wealthier, he might have been able to afford to value his morals more than money, and refused to sell poison to Romeo.
Peter A Capulet servant who invites guests to Capulet’s feast and escorts the Nurse to meet with Romeo. He is illiterate, and a bad singer.
Rosaline The woman with whom Romeo is infatuated at the beginning of the play. Rosaline never appears onstage, but it is said by other characters that she is very beautiful and has sworn to live a life of chastity.
The Chorus The Chorus is a single character who, as developed in Greek drama, functions as a narrator offering commentary on the play’s plot and themes.
Act 1 Sampson and Gregory, servants to the Capulets and Abraham and Balthasar, servants to the Montague family start a street fight, which is joined by Benvolio (Montague) and Tybalt (Capulet). Escalus, the Prince of Verona who angrily learns of this fight, declares a death penalty for further feuding between the two families. Romeo we learn is lovesick; Rosaline, the object of his affections will not requite (return) his love. His friend Benvolio tells Romeo to look at other girls…Meanwhile Capulet is keen for Paris to marry his daughter Juliet and plans a party to be held later that night. Romeo and friends decide to turn up uninvited, Romeo hoping to see Rosaline, whom he still pines for…Lady Capulet discusses the idea of marriage to Paris with Juliet. Juliet keeps her options open. The Nurse wishes Juliet every possible happiness…Meanwhile Mercutio attempts to cheer a lovesick Romeo up, telling him to be rough with love if need be.At the Capulet’s party, Romeo who is disguised by a masque (mask), falls in love with Juliet on sight. Capulet stops Tybalt from attacking Romeo at his party, telling him there will be other opportunities. Both Romeo and Juliet learn that they are each enemies of the other’s family… A Prologue sung by a choir dramatizes the conflict both Romeo and Juliet feel between their love for one another and their loyalty to their respective families.
Act 2 Ignoring the danger, Romeo scales the Capulet’s wall to be near Juliet, the woman he cannot forget… Unnoticed in Juliet’s orchard, Romeo learns of Juliet’s love for him. After declaring their feelings for each other, the two decide to marry. Juliet will send Romeo a messenger in the morning to make plans for their wedding…The very next day, we meet Romeo’s friend, Friar Laurence. He wonders how Romeo can forget Rosaline so quickly but agrees to marry the two since he hopes this marriage it will end the long running Montague / Capulet feud…Romeo catches up with his friends Mercutio and Benvolio. Juliet’s messenger, the Nurse, arrives and the wedding is set for later that day. The Nurse brings Romeo “cords” or ropes which will allow Romeo to climb into Juliet’s bedchamber as her husband later that night… Act II ends with Romeo and Juliet’s marriage
Act 3 Benvolio and Mercutio (both Montagues) meet Tybalt (Capulet). Tybalt attempts to provoke Romeo into fighting. Mercutio fights Tybalt and is killed. Romeo then kills Tybalt. Escalus, the Prince of Verona banishes Romeo from Verona threatening death should he ever return. Juliet learns of Romeo killing Tybalt and despite being torn between her loyalty for her family and Romeo, mourns her husband Romeo’s banishment.Romeo learns of the banishment order, realizing he will not be able to see Juliet again. Friar Laurence suggests Romeo go to Juliet’s bed chamber to comfort his wife… Capulet, who does not know of Romeo and Juliet’s marriage, decides that the marriage of Juliet to Paris must now proceed, bidding his wife to make Juliet aware of Paris’ love for her. The day of the marriage has been decided; it will be Thursday.We learn that Romeo has spent the night with his Juliet. Juliet who is now already secretly married to Romeo, learns that she is to marry Paris. She tries to fight her father’s wishes, failing to dissuade him. Juliet decides to commit suicide if all else fails…
Act 4 Paris reveals that the wedding will occur on Thursday. Juliet is cold to Paris. Friar Laurence tells Juliet to take a potion simulating death, allowing Romeo to take her away, unopposed to Mantua since everyone will think she is dead at the Capulet’s ancient vault or burial ground.Capulet makes plans for Juliet’s wedding. Juliet, who has decided to drink Friar Laurence’s potion, no longer opposes the wedding, delighting Capulet.Hearing this good news, Capulet, who is keen to have Juliet marry Paris decides to move the wedding forward. It will now be on Wednesday morning, not Thursday as previously planned…Juliet succeeds in sleeping alone which allows her to take the potion in privacy. Juliet worries about the Friar’s intentions before the potion takes effect and she falls asleep…Lady Capulet and the Nurse are busy making preparations for the wedding. It is 3 o’clock in the morning and now Capulet hearing music announcing Paris’ arrival, tells the Nurse to wake Juliet. The Capulet’s learn that their daughter Juliet is dead. The wedding preparations are changed to those of a funeral.
Act 5 In Mantua, Romeo learns of Juliet’s death, deciding to risk his own life by returning to Verona at once to see Juliet one last time. Romeo also buys some poison from a local Apothecary.Friar John explains to Friar Laurence that his letter informing Romeo that Juliet is not dead, did not reach Romeo. Friar Laurence tries again to inform Romeo of his plan and heads off to the Capulet burial chamber where Juliet will soon awaken.Paris mourns his bride that never was. Romeo arrives, opening Juliet’s coffin to look at his love one last time. Paris fights Romeo whom he believes is desecrating Juliet’s grave. Paris dies, Romeo placing him beside Juliet. Romeo takes his poison, kisses Juliet and dies. Friar Laurence arrives too late. Juliet, now awakens, asking for her Romeo. Friar Laurence leaves, leaving Juliet alone. Juliet kisses Romeo and stabs herself, dying. The Prince, Capulets, and Montagues arrive, Balthasar and Friar Laurence explaining all. Escalus scolds the two families who finally end their feud. The play ends with the Prince summarizing this tragic love story.
Prologue Arguably Shakespeare’s most famous play begins with a Prologue which establishes that this play will be a tragedy and that the children of two feuding families, Romeo of the Montague family and Juliet of the Capulet family, will both love and die in the course of this play…
Author William Shakespeare
sonnet usually have fourteen lines that can be divided into 5 units
quatrain each set of four lines in
couplets the final two rhyming lines
stress second syllable in Shakespeare rhythm
unstress first syllable in Shakespeare rhythm

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