Romeo and Juliet Quotes

“That which we call a rose by any other word would smell as sweet” (2.2.46-47). Juliet has realized that her only love, Romeo, is her families only hate. But she is thinking to herself that Romeo would be the same person if he was from another family or had another name. She is comparing this thought to the scent of a rose, “That which we call a rose by any other word would smell as sweet” (2.2.46-47). Juliet is talking to herself, a rose would smell just as wonderful if we called it something else, she is trying to think that Romeo is amazing and it’s just his name that her family hates.
“O, swear not by the moon, th’ inconstant moon, that monthly changes in her circled orb, lest that thy love prove likewise variable” (2.2.114-116). Juliet is talking to Romeo who is below her, she wants Romeo to declare her love for her and swear that he has good intentions and really loves her. Romeo tries to swear by the moon but Juliet responds, “O, swear not by the moon, th’ inconstant moon, that monthly changes in her circled orb, lest that thy love prove likewise variable” (2.2.114-116). The moon always changes its shape every day and every month, Juliet doesn’t want Romeo to swear his love on something that’s so inconsistent and always changing.
“Love goes toward love as schoolboys from their books, but love from love, toward school with heavy looks” (2.2.166-168). Romeo is below Juliet’s bedroom and their talking, Juliet is about to leave and Romeo shares a metaphor about love to Juliet, “Love goes toward love as schoolboys from their books, but love from love, toward school with heavy looks” (2.2.166-168). Schoolboys love to get away from their books and are attracted to a break, this is like love being attracted to love. But when love is moving away from love, it’s like schoolboys with much to do and very heavy looks.
“How silver-sweet sound lovers’ tongues by night, like softest music to attending ears” (2.2.176-177). Romeo and Juliet are talking at night, and Romeo is about to leave, but then Juliet calls Romeo back again. He loves the way she calls his name, to her he says, “How silver-sweet sound lovers’ tongues by night, like softest music to attending ears” (2.2.176-177). The wonderful sound of my love’s voice at night is like the softest music to my ears.
“Good night, good night. Parting is such sweet sorrow that I shall say ‘Good night’ till it be morrow” (2.2.199-201). Romeo is talking to Juliet and he says he wishes that he was Juliet’s bird, Juliet responds saying that she would kill him from cherishing him too much. Then Juliet has to part with Romeo until tomorrow, “Good night, good night. Parting is such sweet sorrow that I shall say ‘Good night’ till it be morrow” (2.2.199-201). Good night Romeo. Parting is such a sweet sadness so I’ll say good night until tomorrow.
“Thy head is as full of quarrels as an egg is full of meat…” (3.1.23-24). Mercutio and Benvolio are walking down the streets of Verona on a very hot day, Benvolio says they should go home for if they’re to run into the Capulets a fight will surely break out. Mercutio is joking around and disagrees with Benvolio’s cautiousness, “Thy head is as full of quarrels as an egg is full of meat…” (3.1.23-24). Your head is as full of thinking about fights as an egg is full of meat.
“…’tis not so deep as a well, nor so wide as a church door, but ’tis enough. ‘Twill serve” (3.1.100-101). Mercutio has just been stabbed by Tybalt in a duel, he isn’t dead yet. Mercutio is lying on the street talking to Benvolio and Romeo about his wound, “…’tis not so deep as a well, nor so wide as a church door, but ’tis enough. ‘Twill serve” (3.1.100-101). Mercutio’s wound isn’t as deep as a well, or as large as a church door, but the wound is enough and it’s going to kill him.
“A plague o’ both your houses!” (3.1.111). Mercutio is dying quickly from a wound Tybalt gave him during a duel. As he’s dying he shouts at both Romeo and Benvolio, “A plague o’ both your houses!” (3.1.111). Mercutio has cursed both the Montagues and the Capulets, if they hadn’t hated each other he wouldn’t have been killed in the fight.
“Gallop apace, you fiery-footed steeds” (3.2.1). Juliet is a newly wedded wife to Romeo, little does she know a little while ago Tybalt, her cousin, was killed by Romeo who has now been banished from Verona. She is waiting for night to come so she can see Romeo, “Gallop apace, you fiery-footed steeds” (3.2.1). Move fast, you horse of the Sun.
“Wilt thou be gone? It is not yet near day. It was the nightingale, and not the lark, that pierced the fearful hollow of thine ear” (3.5.1-3). Romeo is with Juliet all night even though Romeo has been banished from the city. If Romeo is caught in Verona he will be killed. They hear a bird and Romeo says the bird is a lark, meaning it’s morning time and he must be going before he’s caught. Juliet argues that it’s the nightingale singing and it’s still night time so he can still stay with her, “Wilt thou be gone? It is not yet near day. It was the nightingale, and not the lark, that pierced the fearful hollow of thine ear” (3.5.1-3). You’re leaving? It’s not even close to day. It was the nightingale, and not the lark, that you just heard sing.
“A pair of star-crossed lovers…” (pro. 6). the chorus is describing the story of Romeo and Juliet to us before the story starts, “A pair of star-crossed lovers…” (pro. 6). 2 lovers who’s fate has already been sealed.
“…sad hours seem long” (1.1.166). Romeo has just ran into Benvolio on the Verona streets. It’s only 9 oclock but because Romeo is hurting with love time is going slow, he says to Benvolio, “…sad hours seem long” (1.1.166). Time is going so slow.
“Alas that love, so gentle in his view, should be so tyrannous and rough in proof!” (1.1.174-175). Benvolio and Romeo are talking about Romeos new love Rosaline, but Romeo is sad for she doesn’t love him, Benvolio tells him, “Alas that love, so gentle in his view, should be so tyrannous and rough in proof!” (1.1.174-175). Your view of love is so gentle, you should make your experiences rough and exciting!
“…I will make thee think thy swan a crow” (1.2.94). Benvolio to RomeoRomeo thinks that Rosaline is the most beautiful girl he’s ever seen, but Benvolio tells him that if he is to look at other girls, he’ll realize that Rosaline isn’t that pretty, “”…I will make thee think thy swan a crow” (1.2.94). Rosaline, who you think is a swan, will look like a crow compared to other girls.
“…Queen Mab…She is the fairies midwife…” (1.4.58-59). Mercutio to RomeoRomeo and Mercutio are talking about dreams before they head off to the Capulets party. Romeo is making smart comebacks to Mercutio. Mercutio responds with a speech about Queen Mab going into people’s dreams, “…Queen Mab…She is the fairies midwife…” (1.4.58-59).
“O, she doth teach the torches to burn bright! It seems she hangs upon the cheek of night like a rich jewel in an Ethiop’s ear…” (1.5.51-53). Romeo to himselfRomeo has snuck into the Capulets party and he sees Juliet for the first time, and he just can’t possibly beleive how beautiful she is, “”O, she doth teach the torches to burn bright! It seems she hangs upon the cheek of night like a rich jewel in an Ethiop’s ear…” (1.5.51-53). She is more beautiful than all the other girls! She’s like a great jewel on the ear of an Ethiop.
“You kiss by th’ book” (1.5.122). Juliet to RomeoRomeo and Juliet have their first interaction ever, Romeo kisses Juliet, and Juliet is surprised by how good of a kisser he is, “You kiss by th’ book” (1.5.122). You really know how to kiss.
“My only love sprung from my only hate! Too early seen unknown, and known too late!” (1.5.152-153). Juliet to herselfJuliet has basically just fallen in love with Romeo after kissing, but then she realizes that he’s a Montague, her families enemy, “My only love sprung from my only hate! Too early seen unknown, and known too late!” (1.5.152-153). She just realizes how Romeo should be her only hate, and she wishes she had known before she kissed him that he was a Montague.
“He jests at scars that never felt a wound. But soft, what light through yonder window breaks?” (2.2.1-2). Romeo to himselfMercutio and Benvolio are in the streets after the party looking for Romeo, but Romeo’s hiding. Mercutio is making jokes about Romeo being a lover-boy hoping that Romeo will come out of hiding. Romeo says to himself after, “He jests at scars that never felt a wound. But soft, what light through yonder window breaks?” (2.2.1-2). As he’s below the Capulets mansion he says that Mercutio’s laughing at Romeo’s complaints of love, but Mercutio has never felt that pain, then a light turns on in a room above him.
“O Romeo, Romeo, wherefore art thou Romeo?” (2.2.36). Juliet to herselfJuliet has just fallen in love with Romeo at the party, and she wishes that he was anything else but a Montague. She says to herself, “O Romeo, Romeo, wherefore art thou Romeo?” (2.2.36). Oh Romeo, where are you?

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