Romeo and Juliet – Fate

“Fatal loins””Star-crossed lovers” “starcrossed” written in the stars, suggests fate, just like horoscopes are read from astrology.”fatal loins” fatal meaning deadly, loins meaning vitality, oxymoron to show fate is against romeo and juliet from beginning.
“i fear too early; for my mind misgives some consequence yet hanging in the stars shall bitterly begin his fearful date with this nights revels…but he that hath the steerage of my course direct my sail.” romeo is accepting his fate. “hanging in the stars” again like prologue reference to his path being “written in the stars” his path has already been made. “Direct thy sail” romeo is accepting his fate, he’s allowing it to guide him to what will ultimately be his end. (lead by mercutios, character, he is impulsive goes with the flow [name means lively, and active])
“if i profane which my unworthiest hand this holy shrine, the gentle sin is this,my lips two blushing pilgrims ready standto smooth that rough touch with a tender kiss” “if i profane which my unworthiest hand this holy shrine, the gentle sin is this,my lips two blushing pilgrims ready standto smooth that rough touch with a tender kiss”
“if he be married my grave is like to be my wedding-bed” juliet foreshadowing her fate, her love for romeo will bring about her death. case of dramatic irony as the audience already knows, fate is being highlighted through dramatic irony.
“let love- devouring death do what he dare, it is enough that i may but call mine” romeo still tempting fate, dramatic irony considering the prologue and its hints to romeo and Juliet’s fate
Come, bitter conduct, come, unsavoury guide!Thou desperate pilot, now at once run onThe dashing rocks thy sea-sick weary bark! romeos references to fate before he dies. Pilot, fate is pulling him to death, or maybe death is pulling him.
“gallop a pace you fiery steeds,

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