romeo and juliet act III scene 3

When speaking to Romeo, Friar Lawrence says, “And though art wedded to calamity… too familiar/ is my dear son with such sour company.” What does the Friar mean by this? Friar Lawrence is saying that Romeo has bad luck. Trouble always seems to find Romeo, so things were bound to go wrong with his marriage to Juliet.
How does Romeo react when he learns that he’s been banished? Romeo’s reaction to being banished is very dramatic. Romeo tells the Friar that he would rather be dead because “exile” is worse than death. He compares banishment to being in hell, and says “There is no world without Verona walls”.
Based on what we know of his character already, does Romeo’s reaction to being banished surprise you? Why or why not? I am not surprised by Romeo’s reaction, because he was always hyper-emotional and over-dramatic, especially when things didn’t go his way.
Romeo says, “‘Tis torture, and not mercy: heaven is here,/ Where Juliet lives; and every cat and dog/ And little mouse, every unworthy thing,/ Live here in heaven and may look upon her,/ But Romeo may not.” What type of figurative language is comparing Verona to heaven an example of?A. PersonificationB. HyperboleC. SimileD. Metaphor B. Hyperbole
What is Romeo complaining about when he says, “‘Tis torture, and not mercy: heaven is here,/ Where Juliet lives; and every cat and dog/ And little mouse, every unworthy thing,/ Live here in heaven and may look upon her,/ But Romeo may not.'” Romeo is complaining about how everyone and everything can “Live here in heaven” with Juliet. The dogs, cats, and mice all get to see her, while he can’t because he has to leave.
Romeo asks the Nurse,”Doth she not think me an old murderer,Now I have stain’d the childhood of our joyWith blood removed but little from her own?”What does Romeo mean when he says, “The childhood of our joy?” “The childhood of our joy” that Romeo is talking about is the young romance / marriage he shares with Juliet. Since he has killed Tybalt, Romeo is worried that Juliet will see him as a murderer instead of a husband.
Romeo asks the Nurse,”Doth she not think me an old murderer,Now I have stain’d the childhood of our joyWith blood removed but little from her own?”About whom is Romeo speaking when he says, “With blood removed but little from her own?” When Romeo says these words, he is speaking about Tybalt, Juliet’s cousin who Romeo has killed.
According to Romeo, why are even the flies better off than he is? Romeo explains that even the flies are better off than he is because “They may seize / On the white wonder of dear Juliet’s hand / And steal immortal blessing from her lips.” The flies can be near Juliet, and they can touch her, but Romeo can’t.
Juliet is not physically in this scene, but we still learn that she feels conflicted about Romeo killing Tybalt. Which lines reveal this conflict to us? Juliet’s conflict about Romeo killing Tybalt is revealed when the Nurse tells Friar Lawrence and Romeo how Juliet “weeps and weeps; and now falls on her bed; and then starts up, and Tybalt calls; and then on Romeo cries.” This implies that Juliet is mourning both the loss of her cousin, who is now dead, and the “loss” of her husband, who is now banished.
Describe an example of the “Man vs. Himself” conflict in Scene 3. Romeo would exemplify the “Man vs. Himself” conflict in Scene 3. Romeo is so upset that he can’t think clearly enough to realize that the Prince actually showed mercy towards him with banishment.
Describe an example of the “Man vs. Society” conflict in Scene 3. An example of a “Man vs. Society” comes in Scene 3 when Romeo and Friar Laurence search for ways to rectify the situation Romeo and Juliet find themselves in. Romeo is banished, and under the threat of death if he’s caught in Verona, but he’s also newly married and he desperately wants to be with his wife.
What is Friar Laurence’s plan to make things right and get Romeo and Juliet back together? The Friar’s plan is detailed in lines 146 – 154. Friar Lawrence tells Romeo that he should go see Juliet that night as planned, but Romeo needs to make sure he leaves before the watch is set, so he can sneak away to Mantua. Romeo is to live there, while Friar Lawrence works to announce the marriage, and use it to bring peace between the Capulets and the Montagues. Then, the Friar will ask the Prince to pardon Romeo, and everyone will live happily ever after.

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