Romeo and Juliet Act III

What is a good paraphrase for Benvolio’s words here:”I pray thee, good Mercutio, let’s retire.The day is hot, the Capels are abroad,And, if we meet, we shall not ‘scape a brawl,For now, these hot days, is the mad blood stirring.” Please Mercutio, let’s go in. It’s hot and the Capulets are out and about. If we meet we’ll surely end up fighting because everyone’s tempers are running high.
What event does this opening passage of Act III hint at or foreshadow?BENVOLIO. I pray thee, good Mercutio, let’s retire.The day is hot, the Capulets are abroad,And, if we meet, we shall not ‘scape a brawl,For now, these hot days, is the mad blood stirring. The fight in which Mercutio and Tybalt are killed
Romeo is motivated to kill Tybalt because Tybalt has killed Mercutio.
In Act III, Juliet addresses the nurse in a monologue that begins “O serpent heart, hid with a flow’ring face! / Did ever dragon keep so fair a cave? / . . . Despised substance of divinist show! / Just opposite to what thou justly seem’st— / A damned saint, an honorable villain!” Juliet is responding to the news of which event? Tybalt’s death by Romeo’s hand
What emotion is Juliet feeling in the “O serpent heart” monologue quoted in the previous question? Confusion
In Act III, Scene iii, in Friar Lawrence’s cell, Romeo addresses Friar Lawrence in a monologue that begins with the lines ” ‘Tis torture, and not mercy. Heaven is here, / Where Juliet lives; and every cat and dog / And little mouse, every unworthy thing, / Live here in heaven and may look on her; / But Romeo may not.” What is Romeo referring to? Banishment
Which of the following emotions can be inferred from Romeo’s words in the following monologue: ” ‘Tis torture, and not mercy. Heaven is here, / Where Juliet lives; and every cat and dog / And little mouse, every unworthy thing, / Live here in heaven and may look on her; / But Romeo may not.” Misery
Why is Capulet so upset by Juliet’s refusal to marry Paris? He does not want to be disrespected by being told “no”
Juliet loses trust in the nurse at the end of Act III because the nurse advises her to marry Paris.
Why does Juliet go to Friar Lawrence’s cell at the end of Act III? To seek his advice
A good example of a soliloquy in Act III In Scene ii, Juliet, alone in her room, expresses her impatience and anxiety.
The central issues of Act III are: Vengeance, forgiveness, obedience
Which scene in Act III is a good example of a monologue In Scene iii, Friar Lawrence speaks sternly to Romeo about feeling sorry for himself.
The Friar, in trying to comfort Romeo, says “A genteler judgment vanished from his lips– / not body’s death, but body’s banisment…Here from Verona art thou banished. / be patient for the world is broad and wide” (3.3.10-16). The word banishment in this context means exiled
Tybalt blames Mercutio for “consorting” with Romeo. A synonym for consort would be associate with
In Juliets’ soliloquy, she states, “O Fortune, Fortune! All men call thee fickle. / if thou art fickle, what dost thou with him / that is renowned for faith? Be fickle, Fortune, / for then I hope thou wilt not keep him long / but send him back” (3.5.60-64). In this context, Juliet wants Fortune to be fickle because wants fate to not be true, but to change so that Romeo can return to her sooner than later
Juliet is confused by the Nurse when she enters Juliet’s room after the fight in Act III. Juliet says, “what storm is this that blows so contrary? / Is Romeo slaughtered and is Tybalt dead?..For who is living, if those two are gone?” (3.2.64-68). Why is Juliet so confused by what the nurse is telling her? The Nurse hasn’t spoken clearly; her words lead Juliet to believe two different things
In the beginning of scene iii, the Frair says to Romeo “Romeo, come forth; come forth, fearful man. / Affliction is enamored of thy parts, / And thou art wedded to calamity” (3.3.1-3). In this context, the Friar’s comparison of Romeo and Juliet’s marriage to that of a marriage to calamity means Romeo and Juliet are prone to disaster and misery
Lord Capulet is furious with Juliet for not accepting the wedding proposal. He says to her, “For, by my soul, I’ll ne’er acknowledge thee, / Nor what is mine shall never do thee good. / Trust to’t. Be think you. I’ll not be forsworn” (3.5.195-197). By forsworn, he means He won’t go back on his word to Paris
What is a synonym for fray? fight

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