Romeo and Juliet – Act 5

What is the mood of scene 1? Happy, optimistic
What literary device is Romeo’s dream Scene 1? And why? Dramatic irony – thinks his dream is a good sign but actually bad
For nothing can be ill if she is well (LD) Antithesis
Then she is well and nothing can be illHer body sleeps in Capels’ monument (meaning) She is dead
is it e’en so?- then I defy you stars! ( 2 LD) Apostrophe + Fate
is it e’en so?- then I defy you stars! (ABC) A. RomeoB. Stars/fateC. I won’t accept that. I will be with Juliet anyways.
Hast thou no letters to me from the friar? (LD) Dramatic Irony
Apothecary (who is he?) Poor Pharmacist
What’s the punishment when drugs are sold in Mantua? Death
Penury (def.) Extreme poverty
That the life-weary taker may fall dead, And that the trunks may be discharged of breath (LD) Simile
Dispatch you straight (meaning) Kill you so quickly
There is thy gold, worse poison to men’s souls,Doing more murder in this loathsome world Than these poor compounds that thou mayst not sell (LDish and meaning) Social comment – money will corrupt you
Come, cordial Apostrophe
Come, cordial and not poison, go with me To Juliet’s grave, for there must I use thee (ABC) A. RomeoB. Poison/himselfC. I am looking forward to drinking it so I can be with Juliet forever
Come, cordial and not poison, go with me To Juliet’s grave, for there must I use thee (LD) Falling action
Infectious pestilence Plague
Why wasn’t the letter to Romeo delivered? Friar John was quarantined.
Unhappy fortune! (LD – what) Oxymoron – reference to fate
Within these three houses will fair Juliet wake. (LD) Time check
Living corse (LD) Oxymoron
Sweet flower, with flowers thy bridal bed I strew (O woe, thy canopy is dust and stones!)… (LD and who says it?) An elegy – Paris
Obsequies (def.) Funeral rite (funeral ceremony)
Why I descend into this bed of death Is partly to behold my lady’s face,But chiefly to take thence from her dead finger A precious ring, a ring that I must useIn dear employment (ABC) A. Romeo B. Balthasar C. Cover story – I’m going to get Juliet’s ring
Muffle me, night, awhile (ABC) A. ParisB. Night/himself C. Hide me night
By heaven, I will tear thee joint by joint And strew this hungry churchyard with thy limbs (meaning) If you comeback, I’ll kill you
By heaven, I will tear thee joint by joint And strew this hungry churchyard with thy limbs (LD) Personification
The time and my intents are savage wild More fierce and more inexorable farThan empty tigers or the roaring sea. (LD) Hyperbole
Who is the “dearest morsel”? Juliet
I’ll cram thee with more food (who is this talking about?) Himself (romeo)
Thou detestable maw, thou womb of death,Gorged with the dearest morsel of the earth,Thus I enforce thy rotten jaws to open,And in dedspite I’ll cram thee with more food (LD) Extended metaphor
What does Paris think Romeo is doing at Juliet’s tomb? Vandalizing
I must indeed and therefore came I hither. (I must indeed what?) Die
Put not another sin upon my head. (What’s the sin? Killing him
A lantern, slaughtered youth,For here lies Juliet, and her beauty makes This vault a feasting presence full of light (LD) Light image
O my love, my wife,Death that hath sucked the honey of thy breath Hath had no power yet upon thy beauty Thou art not conquered. Beauty’s ensign yetIs crimson in thy lips and in thy cheeks And deaths pale flag is not advanced there. (LD) Dramatic irony
O my love, my wife,Death that hath sucked the honey of thy breath Hath had no power yet upon thy beauty Thou art not conquered. Beauty’s ensign yetIs crimson in thy lips and in thy cheeks And deaths pale flag is not advanced there. (Meaning) She’s coming back (doesn’t know that)
Sunder (def.) Break/tear apart
That unsubstantial death is amorous And that the lean abhorred monster keeps Thee here in dark to be his paramour? (LD) Personification
amorous (def.) Romantic feelings
And shake the yoke of inauspicious the starts (what is stars referring to? – LD) Fate
Eyes, look your last! Arms, take your last embrace! (LD) Apostrophe
And lips, O you the doors of breath (LD) Metaphor
Saint Francis be my speed! How oft tonight Have my old feet stumbled at graves! (LD) Chance happening
Ah, what an unkind hours is guilty of this lamentable chance! (LD) Fate
A greater power than we can contradict hath thwarted our intents. (What is the Great power?) Fate
Thy lips are warm! (Why is bad luck?) He just died.
O, happy dagger, (3 LD) Apostrophe, personification, metaphor
Alas, my liege, my wife is dead tonight. Grief of my sons exile hath stopper her breath (LD) Falling action
see what a scourge is laid upon your hate that heaven finds means to kill your joys with love (ABC) A. ParisB. Capulet + MontagueC. Your hatred has killed your children
For I will ray her statue in pure gold, that whiles Verona by that name is known there shall no figure as such rate be set as that of true and faithful Juliet. (Plot) Resolution – making up
As rich shall Romeos by his lady lie. (Plot) More resolution
Go hence to have more talk of these sad things. Some shall be pardoned and some punished (plot) Resolution
For never was a story of more woe than this of Juliet and her Romeo (ABC) A. Prince B. Capulet. + Montague / the audience C. Never been sadder story

You Might Also Like