Romeo and Juliet Act 3 Quote Identification

“I pray thee, good Mercutio, let’s retire: The day is hot, the Capels are abroad, And if we meet we shall not scape a brawl, For now, these hot days, is the mad blood stirring. Benvolio said this quote, and it was directed towards Mercutio.
“Mercutio, thou consortest with Romeo” Tybalt
“Consort? what dost thou ake us minstrels? And thou make minstrels of us, look to hear nothing but discords.” Mercutio
Which literary device is the word “consort”? Pun
“Tybalt, the reason that I have to love thee Doth much excuse the appertaining rage to such a greeting. Villain am I none; therefore farewell, I see thou knowest me not” Romeo
“I do protest I never injuried thee, but love thee better than thou canst devise, till thou shalt know the reason of my love; and so, good Capulet, which name I tender as dearly as mine own, be satisfied” Romeo
“Ay, ay, a scratch, a scratch, marry, ’tis enough. Where is my page? Go villian, fetch a surgeon.” Mercutio
“No ’tis not so deep as a well, nor so wide as a church- door, but tis enough, ’twill serve. Ask for me tomorrow, and you shall find me a grave man.” Mercutio
“Grave man” is which literary device? Pun
“Help me into some house, Benvolio, or I shall faint. A plague a’both your houses! They have made worms’ meat of me. I have it, and soundly too. Your houses!” Mercutio
“This gentleman, the prince’s near ally, my very friend, hath got his mortal hurt in my behalf; my reputation stain’d with Tybalt’s slander- Tybalt, that an hour hath been my cousin. O sweet Juliet, they beauty hath made me effeminate, and in temper soften’d valour’s steel!” Romeo
“O Romeo, Romeo, brave Mercutio is dead.” Benvolio
“This day’s black fate on moe days doth depend, this but begins the woe others must end” Romeo
“Where are the vile beginners of this fray?” Prince Escales
“O noble Prince, I can discover all the unlucky manage of this fatal brawl; there lies the man, slain by young Romeo, that slew thy kinsman, brave Mercutio” Benvolio
“Tybalt, my cousin! O my brothers child! O prince! O husband! O, the blood is spill’d of my dear kinsman. Prince, as thou art true, for blood of ours, shed blood of Montague. O cousin, cousin!” Lady Capulet
“I beg for justice, which thou, Prince, must give: Romeo slew Tybalt, Romeo must not live.” Lady Capulet
“Immediately, we do exile him hence. I have an interest in your hearts’ proceeding: My blood for your rude brawls doth lie a-bleeding; but i’ll amerce you with so strong a fine that you shall all repent the loss of mine” Prince Escales
Scene 2 begins with a long speech by Juliet, as she is eagerly waiting for Romeo. What kind of literary device describes this speech? Soliloquy
“And she brings news, and every tongue speaks but Romeo’s name speaks heavenly eloquence. Now, Nurse, what news? What hast thou there? the cords that Romeo did thee fetch?” Juliet
“Ah weraday, he’s dead, he’s dead, he’s dead! We are undone lady, we are undone. Alack the day, he’s gone, he’s kill’d, he’s dead!” Nurse
“O break, my heart, poor bankrout, break at once! To prison, eyes, ne’er look on loberty! Vile eart, to earth resign,vend motion here, and thou and Romeo press one heavy bier!” Juliet
“Tybalt is gone and Romeo is banished, Romeo that kill’d him, he is banished” Nurse, said to Juliet
“O serpent heart hid with a flowering face!Did ever dragon keep so fair a cave?Beautiful tyrant! Fiend angelical!Dove-feathered raven, wolvish-ravening lamb!Despisèd substance of divinest show,Just opposite to what thou justly seem’st.A damnèd saint, an honorable villain!O nature, what hadst thou to do in hellWhen thou didst bower the spirit of a fiendIn moral paradise of such sweet flesh?Was ever book containing such vile matterSo fairly bound? Oh, that deceit should dwellIn such a gorgeous palace!” Juliet
What literary device is used in these lines?”O serpent heart hid with a flowering face!Did ever dragon keep so fair a cave?Beautiful tyrant! Fiend angelical!Dove-feathered raven, wolvish-ravening lamb!Despisèd substance of divinest show,Just opposite to what thou justly seem’st.A damnèd saint, an honorable villain!O nature, what hadst thou to do in hellWhen thou didst bower the spirit of a fiendIn moral paradise of such sweet flesh?Was ever book containing such vile matterSo fairly bound? Oh, that deceit should dwellIn such a gorgeous palace!” Oxymoron
“No faith, no honesty in men. All perjured,All forsworn, all naught, all dissemblers.Ah, where’s my man?—Give me some aqua vitae.—These griefs, these woes, these sorrows make me old.Shame come to Romeo!” Nurse
“Blistered be thy tongueFor such a wish! He was not born to shame.Upon his brow shame is ashamed to sit,For ’tis a throne where honor may be crowned.Sole monarch of the universal earth,Oh, what a beast was I to chide at him!” Juliet, said to the Nurse
Shall I speak ill of him that is my husband?Ah, poor my lord, what tongue shall smooth thy name,When I, thy three hours’ wife, have mangled it?But wherefore, villain, didst thou kill my cousin?That villain cousin would have killed my husband.Back, foolish tears, back to your native spring.Your tributary drops belong to woe,Which you, mistaking, offer up to joy.My husband lives, that Tybalt would have slain,And Tybalt’s dead, that would have slain my husband.All this is comfort. Wherefore weep I then?Some word there was, worser than Tybalt’s death,That murdered me. I would forget it fain,But oh, it presses to my memory,Like damnèd guilty deeds to sinners’ minds.”Tybalt is dead, and Romeo banishèd.That “banishèd,” that one word “banishèd”Hath slain ten thousand Tybalts. Tybalt’s deathWas woe enough, if it had ended there.Or, if sour woe delights in fellowshipAnd needly will be ranked with other griefs,Why followed not, when she said “Tybalt’s dead,””Thy father” or “thy mother,” nay, or both,Which modern lamentations might have moved?But with a rearward following Tybalt’s death,”Romeo is banishèd.” To speak that word,Is father, mother, Tybalt, Romeo, Juliet,All slain, all dead. “Romeo is banishèd.”There is no end, no limit, measure, bound,In that word’s death. No words can that woe sound.Where is my father and my mother, Nurse? “ Juliet
“Hie to your chamber. I’ll find RomeoTo comfort you. I wot well where he is.Hark ye, your Romeo will be here at night.I’ll to him. He is hid at Lawrence’ cell.” Nurse
“O, find him! Give this ring to my true knight,And bid him come to take his last farewell.” Juliet
“Ha, banishment! Be merciful, say “death,”For exile hath more terror in his look,Much more than death. Do not say “banishment.” Romeo
There is no world without Verona wallsBut purgatory, torture, hell itself.Hence “banishèd” is banished from the world,And world’s exile is death. Then “banishèd,” Is death mistermed. Calling death “banishment,”Thou cutt’st my head off with a golden axAnd smilest upon the stroke that murders me.” Romeo
“‘Tis torture and not mercy. Heaven is here,Where Juliet lives, and every cat and dogAnd little mouse, every unworthy thing,Live here in heaven and may look on her,But Romeo may not.” Romeo
“To mangle me with that word ‘banished’?” Romeo
Yet “banishèd”? Hang up philosophy!Unless philosophy can make a Juliet,Displant a town, reverse a prince’s doom,It helps not, it prevails not. Talk no more. Romeo
Thou canst not speak of that thou dost not feel.Wert thou as young as I, Juliet thy love,An hour but married, Tybalt murderèd,Doting like me, and like me banishèd,Then mightst thou speak, then mightst thou tear thy hairAnd fall upon the ground, as I do now,Taking the measure of an unmade grave. Romeo

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