Romeo and Juliet Act 3 figurative

(Act 3, scene 1, line 30) Mercutio: “The fee simple? O simple!” “Fee simple”? How simple! This is an example of a pun.
(Act 3, scene 1, lines 40-41) Tybalt: “Mercutio, thou consortest with Romeo?”Mercutio: “Consort? What, dost thou make us minstrels?” Tybalt: “Mercutio–you belong to Romeo’s group–“Mercutio: “Group? What! Do you think we’re musicians?” This is an example of a pun.
(Act 3, scene 1, line 72) Mercutio: “Good King of Cats, nothing but one of your nine lives.” “Good King of Cats, I only want one of your nine lives.” This is an example of an allusion and a metaphor.
(Act 3, scene 2, lines 2-3) Juliet: “Toward Phoebus’ lodging! Such a wagoner As Phaeton would whip you to the West, And bring in cloudy night immediately.” “A driver like Phaeton—the sun god’s son—could whip you toward the west and bring in the cloudy night immediately.” This is an example of an allusion.
(Act 3, scene 2, line 19) Juliet: “Whiter than new snow on a raven’s back.” This is an example of a simile.
(Act 3, scene 2, line 26) Juliet: “O, I have bought the mansion of a love, But not possessed it; and though I am sold, Not yet enjoyed.” “Oh, I have bought a mansion called love, but I haven’t yet occupied it! And though I’ve been sold, I haven’t yet been enjoyed by my owner.” This is an example of a metaphor.
What figurative language is this an example of? “O, Romeo!” Dramatic irony
(Act 3, scene 2, line 55) Nurse: “A piteous corse, a bloody piteous corse; Pale, pale as ashes, all bedaubed in blood, All in gore blood. I swounded at the sight.” “A pitiful corpse, a bloody pitiful corpse, pale, pale as ashes, all covered with blood, all glory blood. I fainted at the sight.” This is an example of a simile.
(Act 3, scene 2, lines 75-76) Juliet: “Beautiful tyrant! fiend angelical! Dove-feathered raven! wolvish-ravening lamb!” “Beautiful wickedness! Angelic devil! Dove-like raven! Wolf-like lamb!” This is an example of an oxymoron.
(Act 3, scene 2, line 83)Juliet: “Was ever book containing such vile matterSo fairly bound?” “Was there ever a book that contained such evil words inside such a beautiful cover?” This is an example of a metaphor.
(Act 3, scene 2, lines 93-94) Juliet: “He was not born to shame.Upon his brow shame is asham’d to sit;For ’tis a throne where honor may be crown’dSole monarch of the universal earth.” Juliet is describing Romeo’s face to her Nurse. This is an example of personification and metaphor.
(Act 3, scene 2, line 95)Juliet: “O, what a beast was I to chide at him!” “Oh, what a beast I was to criticize him!” This is an example of a metaphor.
(Act 3, scene 2, lines 122-124)Juliet: “”Romeo is banished”—to speak that wordIs father, mother, Tybalt, Romeo, Juliet, All slain, all dead.” “But to follow “Tybalt’s dead” with “Romeo is banished”! To speak that word is like saying father, mother, Tybalt, Romeo, Juliet, all are killed, all are dead.” This is an example of foreshadowing.
(Act 3, scene 3, lines 56-57)Friar Lawrence: “To comfort thee, though thou art banished.”Romeo: “Yet “banished”? Hang up philosophy!” Friar Lawrence: “That will give you comfort, even though you’re banished.” Romeo: Still talking “banished”? Hang philosophy!” This is an example of foreshadowing.
(Act 3, scene 2)Juliet: “Come, civil night,Thou sober-suited matron all in black,And learn me how to lose a winning match,Play’d for a pair of stainless maidenhoods.” Juliet is begging for night to come so that she can see Romeo. This is an example of a metaphor.
(Act 3, scene 3)Romeo: ‘Tis torture, and not mercy. Heaven is here,Where Juliet lives; and every cat and dogAnd little mouse, every unworthy thing,” Romeo is telling Friar Lawrence how his banishment from Verona is a terrible punishment and torture because he is not with Juliet. This is an example of a metaphor.
(Act 3, scene 4)Lord Capulet: “Sir Paris, I will make a desperate tenderOf my child’s love. I think she will be rul’dIn all respects by me; nay more, I doubt it not.” Lord Capulet has just offered Juliet to be married to Paris not knowing that she is already married to Romeo, and she cannot be married to both.This is an example of irony and symbol.
(Act 3, scene 1)Romeo: With Tybalt’s slander- Tybalt, that an hourHath been my cousin. O sweet Juliet,Thy beauty hath made me effeminateAnd in my temper soft’ned valor’s steel!” Romeo speaks these lines after Tybalt kills Mercutio as if he is talking to Juliet about it.This is an example of apostrophe.
(Act 3, scene 2)Juliet: O serpent heart hid with a flowering face!Did ever dragon keep so fair a cave?Beautiful tyrant! Fiend angelical! About Romeo killed Tybalt, Juliet thinks Romeo has a serpent heart, (a heart compared to a cold blooded snake) that is hidden behind a pretty (flow’ring) face. This is an example of metaphor.
(Act 3, scene 5)CAPULET: For still thy eyes, which I may call the sea,Do ebb and flow with tears. The bark thy body is,Sailing in this salt flood. The winds thy sighs,Who, raging with thy tears, and they with them,Without a sudden calm will oversetThy tempest-toss├Ęd body Capulet thought Juliet’s non-stop crying was over her cousin’s death.Like the sea, your eyes ebb and flow with tears. Your body is like the ship, sailing in the salt water of your tears. The winds are your sighs, which rage with tears and, unless you immediately calm down, will toss your body as if it’s in a storm and sink you.This is an example of metaphor.

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