Romeo and Juliet: Act 2 Scene 4 Quotes

“he’ the courageous captain of compliments!” Mercutio is describing Tybalt as an outgoing and determined individual, although with strong self loving that will cause him to fish for compliments off others. He is mocking Tybalt’s selfishness.
“I will bite thee by the ear for that jest” Mercutio’s humerous and quite immature style of character is reflected yet again by his sexual references in his language, he says playfully that he will bite Romeo by the ear; showing their strong friendship which only makes Mercutio’s death later on more emotional.
“prick of noon” Mercutio again shows his strong style of character by talking to the Nurse in what seemed an inappropriate way; the literal meanings of ‘prick’ cause the Nurse to respond im horror and shouts “Out upon you! What a man are you?”
“saucy merchant” The Nurse talks to Romeo as she ‘desire some confidence with you’ , Mercutio again makes one of his retorts which causes the Nurse to call him a rude and insolent character. She is shocked and almost embarassed because he was ‘so full of his ropery?’
“if ye should lead her into a fool’s paradise” The Nurse is showing Romeo how protective she is of her mistress as ‘the gentlewoman is young’ and therefore very naive, she declares that if he were to lead her on and then leave her(taking advantage of her innocence) ‘it were a very gross kind of behaviour’ (wicked)
“I protest unto thee -“ After having heard what the Nurse would hope will not happen, he swears/declares his love for Juliet(possibly appaled she would even think that of him). This beginning of a declaration certains the Nurse that he has a ‘Good heart!’ and ‘she will be a joyful woman!’
“My mistress is the sweetest lady” The Nurse again is wanting to protect Juliet from being hurt or mislead, so she is using a superlative of sweetest to try and make Romeo feel guilty if he were to do something bad to her (or potentially lucky that he has been able to have access to Juliet).

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