Romeo and Juliet ACT 1- 3

Who said this? What does it mean?”Rebellious subjects, enemies to peace,Profaners of this neighbor-stained steel!-Will they not hear?-What, hoi You men, you beasts, That quench the fire of your pernicious rage With purple fountains issuing from your veins, On pain of torture, from those bloody hands Throw your mistempered weapons to the ground,And hear the sentence of your moved prince. Three civil brawls, bred of an airy word, By thee, old Capulet, and Montague, Have thrice disturbed the quiet of our streets And made Verona’s ancient citizens Cast by their grave-beseeming ornaments, To wield old partisans in hands as old, Cankered with peace, to part your cankered hate.” Prince
Who said this? What does it mean?”And too soon marred are those so early made.Earth hath swallowed all my hopes but she. She’s the hopeful lady of my earth. But woo her, gentle Paris, get her heart. My will to her consent is but a part. An she agreed within her scope of choice, Lies my consent and fair according voice. This night I hold an old accustomed feast, Whereto I have invited many a guest Such as I love. And you among the store, One more, most welcome, makes my number more. At my poor house look to behold this night Earth-treading stars that make dark heaven light.Such comfort as do lusty young men feelWhen well-appareled April on the heel Of limping winter treads. Even such delight Among fresh fennel buds shall you this night Inherit at my house. Hear all, all see, And like her most whose merit most shall be-Which on more view of many, mine, being one, May stand in number, though in reckoning none, Come, go with me. (to PETER, giving him a paper) Go, sirrah, trudge about Through fair Verona. Find those persons out Whose names are written there, and to them say My house and welcome on their pleasure stay.” Capulet
Who says this? What does it mean?”What say you? Can you love the gentleman?This night you shall behold him at our feast. Read o’er the volume of young Paris’ face And find delight writ there with beauty’s pen. Examine every married lineament And see how one another lends content, And what obscured in this fair volume lies Find written in the margin of his eyes. This precious book of love, this unbound lover, To beautify him only lacks a cover. The fish lives in the sea, and ’tis much pride For fair without the fair within to hide. That book in many’s eyes doth share the glory That in gold clasps locks in the golden story. So shall you share all that he doth possess By having him, making yourself no less.” Lady Capulet
Who says this? What does it mean?”True, I talk of dreams,Which are the children of an idle brain, Begot of nothing but vain fantasy,Which is as thin of substance as the airAnd more inconstant than the wind, who woosEven now the frozen bosom of the north, And, being angered, puffs away from thence, Turning his face to the dew-dropping south.” Mercutio
Who says this? What does it mean?”Oh, she doth teach the torches to burn bright!It seems she hangs upon the cheek of night Like a rich jewel in an Ethiope’s ear,Beauty too rich for use, for earth too dear.So shows a snowy dove trooping with crows As yonder lady 0′ er her fellows shows. The measure done, I’ll watch her place of stand, And, touching hers, make blessed my rude hand. Did my heart love till now? Forswear it, sight! For I ne’ er saw true beauty till this night.” Romeo
Who says this? What does it mean?”Now old desire doth in his deathbed lie,And young affection gapes to be his heir.That fair for which love groaned for and would dieWith tender Juliet match’d, is now not fair.Now Romeo is beloved and loves again,Alike bewitched by the charm of looks,But to his foe supposed he must complain,And she steal love’s sweet bait from fearful hooks.Being held a foe, he may not have accessTo breathe such vows as lovers use to swear.And she as much in love, her means much lessTo meet her new beloved anywhere.But passion lends them power, time means, to meet,Tempering extremities with extreme sweet.” Romeo
Who says this? What does it mean?”She speaks, yet she says nothing. What of that?Her eye discourses. I will answer it.-I am too bold. ‘Tis not to me she speaks.Two of the fairest stars in all the heaven,Having some business, do entreat her eyesTo twinkle in their spheres till they return.What if her eyes were there, they in her head?The brightness of her cheek would shame those starsAs daylight doth a lamp. Her eye in heaven” Romeo
Who says this? What does it mean?”‘Tis but thy name that is my enemy.Thou art thyself, though not a Montague.What’s Montague? It is nor hand, nor foot,Nor arm, nor face, nor any other partBelonging to a man. 0, be some other name!What’s in a name? That which we call a roseBy any other word would smell as sweet.So Romeo would, were he not Romeo called,Retain that dear perfection which he owesWithout that title. Romeo, doff thy name,And for that name, which is no part of theeTake all myself.” Juliet
Who says this? What does it mean?”Thou know’st the mask of night is on my face,Else would a maiden blush bepaint my cheekFor that which thou hast heard me speak tonight .Fain would I dwell on form. Fain, fain denyWhat I have spoke. But farewell compliment!Dost thou love me? I know thou wilt say /lay,”And I will take thy word. Yet if thou swear’stThou mayst prove false. At lovers’ perjuries,They say, Jove laughs. 0 gentle Romeo,If thou dost love, pronounce it faithfully.Or if thou think’st I am too quickly won,I’ll frown and be perverse and say thee nay,So thou wilt woo. But else, not for the world.In truth, fair Montague, I am too fond,And therefore thou mayst think my ‘havior light.But trust me, gentleman, I’ll prove more trueThan those that have more coying to be strange.I should have been more strange, I must confess,But that thou overheard’st, ere I was ‘ware,My true love’s passion. Therefore pardon me,And not impute this yielding to light love,Which the dark night hath so discovered.” Juliet
Who says this? What does it mean?”The gray-eyed morn smiles on the frowning night,Checkering the eastern clouds with streaks oflight.And fleckled darkness like a drunkard reelsFrom forth day’s path and Titan’s fiery wheels.Now, ere the sun advance his burning eye,The day to cheer and night’s dank dew to dry,I must upfill this osier cage of oursWith baleful weeds and precious-juiced flowers.The earth, that’s nature’s mother, is her tomb.What is her burying, grave that is her womb.And from her womb children of divers kindWe sucking on her natural bosom find,Many for many virtues excellent,None but for some and yet all different.Oh, mickle is the powerful grace that liesIn herbs, plants, stones, and their true qualities.For naught so vile that on the earth doth liveBut to the earth some special good doth give.Nor aught so good but, strained from that fair useRevolts from true birth, stumbling on abuse.Virtue itself turns vice, being misapplied,And vice sometime by action dignified.(Enter ROMEO)Within the infant rind of this small flowerPoison hath residence and medicine power.For this, being smelt, with that part cheers each part;Being tasted, stays all senses with the heart.Two such opposed kings encamp them still,In man as well as herbs- grace and rude will.” Friar Lawrence
Who says this? What does it mean?”More than Prince of Cats. Oh, he’s the courageous captain of compliments. He fights as you sing prick-song, keepstime, distance, and proportion. He rests his minim rests-one, two, and the third in your bosom. The very butcher ofa silk button, a duelist, a duelist, a gentleman of the veryfirst house of the first and second cause. Ah, the immortalpassado, the punto reverso, the hai!” Mercutio
Who says this? What does it mean?”The clock struck nine when I did send the Nurse,In half an hour she promised to return.Perchance she cannot meet him. That’s not so.Oh, she is lame! Love’s heralds should be thoughts,Which ten times faster glide than the sun’s beams,Driving back shadows over louring hills.Therefore do nimble-pinioned doves draw loveAnd therefore hath the wind-swift Cupid wings.Now is the sun upon the highmost hillOf this day’s journey, and from nine till twelveIs three long hours, yet she is not come.Had she affections and warm youthful blood,She would be as swift in motion as a ball.My words would bandy her to my sweet love,And his to me.But old folks, many feign as they were dead,Unwieldy, slow, heavy, and pale as lead.” Juliet
Who says this? What does it mean?”These violent delights have violent endsAnd in their triumph die, like fire and powder,Which, as they kiss, consume. The sweetest honeyIs loathsome in his own deliciousnessAnd in the taste confounds the appetite .Therefore love moderately. Long love doth so.Too swift arrives as tardy as too slow.(Enter JULIET, somewhat fast, and embraceth ROMEO)Here comes the lady. Oh, so light a footWill ne’er wear out the everlasting flint.A lover may bestride the gossamersThat idles in the wanton summer air,And yet not fall. So light is vanity.” Friar Lawrence
Who says this? What does it mean?”Nay, an there were two such, we should have none shortly,for one would kill the other. Thou, why, thou wilt quarrelwith a man that hath a hair more or a hair less in his beardthan thou hast. Thou wilt quarrel with a man for crackingnuts, having no other reason but because thou hast hazeleyes. What eye but such an eye would spy out such aquarrel? Thy head is as full of quarrels as an egg is full ofmeat, and yet thy head hath been beaten as addle as an eggfor quarreling. Thou hast quarreled with a man forcoughing in the street because he hath wakened thy dog thathath lain asleep in the sun. Didst thou not fall out with atailor for wearing his new doublet before Easter? Withanother, for tying his new shoes with old ribbon? And yetthou wilt tutor me from quarreling!” Mercutio
Who says this? What does it mean?”Tybalt here slain, whom Romeo’s hand did slay.Romeo, that spoke him fair, bade him bethinkHow nice the quarrel was and urged withalYour high displeasure. All this utteredWith gentle breath, calm look, knees humbly bowed,Could not take truce with the unruly spleenOf Tybalt deaf to peace, but that he tiltsWith piercing steel at bold Mercutio’s breast,Who, all as hot, turns deadly point to point,And, with a martial scorn, with one hand beatsCold death aside and with the other sendsIt back to Tybalt, whose dexterity,Retorts it. Romeo, he cries aloud,”Hold, friends! Friends, part! ” and, swifter than his tongue,His agile arm beats down their fatal points,And ‘twixt them rushes-underneath whose armAn envious thrust from Tybalt hit the lifeOf stout Mercutio, and then Tybalt fled . But by and by comes back to Romeo,Who had but newly entertained revenge,And to ‘t they go like lightning, for ere ICould draw to part them was stout Tybalt slain. And, as he fell, did Romeo turn and fly. This is the truth, or let Benvolio die.” Benvolio
Who says this? What does it mean?” o serpent heart hid with a flowering face! Did ever dragon keep so fair a cave? Beautiful tyrant! Fiend angelical! Dove-feathered raven, wolvish-ravening lamb! Despised substance of divinest show,Just opposite to what thou justly seem’st. A damned saint, an honorable villain! o nature, what hadst thou to do in hellWhen thou didst bower the spirit of a fiendIn moral paradise of such sweet flesh? Was ever book containing such vile matterSo fairly bound? Oh, that deceit should dwellIn such a gorgeous palace!” Juliet
Who says this? What does it mean?”Hold thy desperate hand.Art thou a man? Thy form cries out thou art.Thy tears are womanish. Thy wild acts denoteThe unreasonable fury of a beast. Unseemly woman in a seeming man,And ill-beseeming beast in seeming both! Thou hast amazed me. By my holy order,I thought thy disposition better tempered. Hast thou slain Tybalt? Wilt thou slay thyself,And slay thy lady that in thy life lives By doing damned hate upon thyself?Why rail’st thou on thy birth, the heaven, and earth? Since birth and heaven and earth, all three do meetIn thee at once, which thou at once wouldst lose? Fie, fie, thou shamest thy shape, thy love, thy wit,Which, like a usurer, abound’st in allAnd usest none in that true use indeedWhich should bedeck thy shape, thy love, thy wit. Thy noble shape is but a form of wax,Digressing from the valor of a man;Thy dear love sworn but hollow perjury,Killing that love which thou hast vowed to cherish;Thy wit, that ornament to shape and love,Misshapen in the conduct of them both,Like powder in a skill-less soldier’s flask,Is set afire by thine own ignorance;And thou dismembered with thine own defence.What, rouse thee, man! Thy Juliet is alive,For whose dear sake thou wast but lately dead-There art thou happy. Tybalt would kill thee,But thou slew’st Tybalt-there art thou happy. The law that threatened death becomes thy friendAnd turns it to exile-there art thou happy. A pack of blessings light upon thy back,Happiness courts thee in her best array,But, like a misbehaved and sullen wench,Thou pout’st upon thy fortune and thy love.Take heed, take heed, for such die miserable. Go, get thee to thy love, as was decreed. Ascend her chamber, hence, and comfort her.But look thou stay not till the watch be set,For then thou canst not pass to Mantua,Where thou shalt live, till we can find a timeTo blaze your marriage, reconcile your friends,Beg pardon of the Prince, and call thee backWith twenty hundred thousand times more joyThan thou went’st forth in lamentation.- Go before, Nurse. Commend me to thy lady,And bid her hasten all the house to bed,Which heavy sorrow makes them apt unto. Romeo is coming.” Friar Lawrence
Who says this? What does it mean?”God’s bread! It makes me mad.Day, night, hour, tide, time, work, play,Alone, in company, still my care hath beenTo have her matched. And having now providedA gentleman of noble parentage,Of fair demesnes, youthful, and nobly trained,Stuffed, as they say, with honorable parts,Proportioned as one’s thought would wish a man-And then to have a wretched puling fool,A whining mammet, in her fortune’s tender,To answer “I’ll not wed,” “I cannot love,””I am too young,” “I pray you, pardon me.”- But, an you will not wed, I’ll pardon you.Graze where you will, you shall not house with me. Look to ‘t, think on ‘t, I do not use to jest. Thursday is near. Lay hand on heart, advise. An you be mine, I’ll give you to my friend. An you be not, hang, beg, starve, die in the streets,For, by my soul, I’ll ne’er acknowledge thee,Nor what is mine shall never do thee good . Trust to ‘t, bethink you. I’ll not be forsworn.” Capulet
What makes a person a tragic hero? A Tragic Hero is better than everyone else but has a flaw that takes over their life and destroys them.
What is a calamity? An event causing great and often sudden damage or distress; a disaster
What is Iambic Pentameter? A line of verse with five metrical feet, each consisting of one short (or unstressed) syllable followed by one long (or stressed) syllable, for example Two households, both alike in dignity.
Find an example of imagery from the passages above and present it below: Now, ere the sun advance his burning eye,The day to cheer and night’s dank dew to dry,I must upfill this osier cage of oursWith baleful weeds and precious-juiced flowers.The earth, that’s nature’s mother, is her tomb.
Find an example of metaphor from the passages above and present it below: “Will they not hear?-What, hoi You men, you beasts” (Prince).
Find an example of simile from the passages above and present it below: “It seems she hangs upon the cheek of night Like a rich jewel in an Ethiope’s ear,Beauty too rich for use, for earth too dear” (Romeo).
Find an example of personification from the passages above and present it below: “That fair for which love groaned for and would die” Love cannot groan.
Find an example of an oxymoron from the passages above and present it below: ” o serpent heart hid with a flowering face! Did ever dragon keep so fair a cave? Beautiful tyrant! Fiend angelical! Dove-feathered raven, wolvish-ravening lamb! Despised substance of divinest show,Just opposite to what thou justly seem’st. A damned saint, an honorable villain! o nature, what hadst thou to do in hellWhen thou didst bower the spirit of a fiendIn moral paradise of such sweet flesh? Was ever book containing such vile matterSo fairly bound? Oh, that deceit should dwellIn such a gorgeous palace” (Juliet)
What are possible themes of Romeo and Juliet? -Love can always come when you are least expecting it. -Love can make you do crazy things.
What makes a play tragic? When the main character is suffering from extreme sorrow, or is ruined.

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