Romeo and Juliet

‘Makes himself an artificial night’ (1.1.134 Montegue) – believes that his life has no light Artificial
‘Feather of lead, bright smoke, cold fire, sick health’ (1.1.174) – confliction (Oxymorons)
‘I have lost myself, i am not here’ (1.1.191) – feels hollow inside, uncomprehensive Lost
‘She is too fair, too wise, wisely too fair’ (1.1.215) – perfect for him, he has lost a lot Fair/wise
‘Do I live dead?’ (1.1.218) – nothing to live for without Rosaline Live dead
‘And these (his eyes), who often drowned shall never die’ (1.2.92) – can’t stop crying, overdramatic, in pain Often drowned
‘I have a soul of lead’ (1.4.15) – ‘lead’ shows weight of emotions, contrast with Mercutio light persona Lead (metal)
‘I am too sore enpierced with his shaft’ (1.4.19) – ‘enpierced’ emotions very painful, no control as cupids fault, fate Enpierced
‘It pricks like a thorn’ (1.4.26) Thorn
‘On, lusty gentlemen’ (1.5.113) Lusty
‘Snowy dove trooping with crows’ (1.5.47) Dove/crows
‘For I ne’vr saw true beauty till this night’ (1.5.52) – Rosalina incomparable, love at first sight, fate True beauty
‘Dear saint’ (1.5.102) – repeated (2.2.55), religious imagery, metaphor of purity Saint
‘Give me my sin again’ (1.5.109) – knows that it is not proper but lusty, fated Sin again
‘My life is my foe’s debt’ (1.5.117) – hyperbole, dramatic, love at first sight Debt
‘Juliet is the sun’ (2.2.3) Sun
‘Two of the fairest stars in all the heaven’ (2.2.15) – Purity, link to star-crossed lovers, fated to be in heaven Fairest stars
‘Bright angel’ (2.2.26) Angel
‘My life were better ended by their hate’ (2.2.77) Ended
‘I am no pilot’ (2.2.82) Pilot
‘O wilt thou leave me so unsatisfied’ (2.2.125) Unsatisfied
‘Th’exchange of thy faithful love’s vow for mine’ (2.2.127) Vow
‘Too flattering sweet to be substantial’ (2.2.141) Substantial
”Retiring slowly” (2.2.stage direction) Retiring
‘Tybalt the reason that I have to love thee doth much excuse the appertaining rage’ (3.1.59-60) Excuse
‘Till thou shalt know the reason of my love’ (3.1.67) Reason
‘Gentle Mercutio, put thy rapier up’ (3.1.80) Gentle
‘Thy beauty hath made me effeminate’ (3.1.110) – his love made him softer, caused Mercutio’s death, fated to cause harm, feels like failed family Effeminate
‘This day’s black fate on moe days doth depend, this but begins the woe others must end’ (3.1.115-6) Black fate
‘Either thou or I, or both, must go with him’ (3.1.125) Both
‘O, I am fortune’s fool’ (3.1.131) – toying with him by giving him hope, fool for believing luck was in his favour, blames fate not himself Fool
‘Banishment? Be merciful, say ‘death” (3.3.12) Banishment
‘There is no world without Verona walls, but purgatory, torture hell itself’ (3.3.17) Verona walls
‘Heaven is here where Juliet lives’ (3.3.29-30) Heaven
‘Hadst thou no poison mix’d? No sharp ground knife?’ (3.3.44-45) Poison/knife
‘Doth she think me an old murderer?’ (3.3.94) Old murderer
‘Thy noble shape is but a form of wax’ (3.3.126 Friar L) Wax
‘Night’s candles are burnt out’ (3.5.9) Candles
‘More light and light, more dark and dark our woes’ (3.5.36) Light/dark
“He goeth down” (3.5.stage directions) He yelleth timber
‘My dreams presage some joyful news at hand’ (5.1.2) – {Queen Mab, iron} News
‘I dreamt my lady came and found me dead’ (5.1.6) – dramatic irony, proleptic marker Dreamt
‘For nothing can be ill if she is well’ (5.1.16) ‘Then she is well and nothing can be ill’ (5.1.17 Balthazar) – Chiasmus, dreams shattered Ill/well
‘I defy you, stars!’ (5.1.24) – trying to control fate Defy
‘I sell thee poison, thou hast sold me none’ (5.1.83) – Believes money to be poison, not death which is a release Sell
‘I beseech thee, youth, put not another sin upon my head’ (5.3.61-62) – imperative, belittling, trying to stop fate Beseech
‘I love thee better than myself’ (5.3.64) – links to ‘which name I tender as dearly as my own’, become less self obsessed Better
‘A dateless bargain to engrossing Death!’ (5.3.115) – capitalisation, personification, ‘dateless’ fate Bargain
‘Thus with a kiss I die’ (5.3.120) – links to ‘one kiss and I’ll descend’ (3.5.42) Kiss
‘More light and light, more dark and dark our woes’ (3.5.36) Light/dark
“He goeth down” (3.5.stage directions) He yelleth timber
‘My dreams presage some joyful news at hand’ (5.1.2) – Queen Mab, irony News
‘I dreamt my lady came and found me dead’ (5.1.6) – dramatic irony, proleptic marker Dreamt
‘For nothing can be ill if she is well’ (5.1.16) ‘Then she is well and nothing can be ill’ (5.1.17 Balthazar) – Chiasmus, dreams shattered Ill/well
‘I defy you, stars!’ (5.1.24) – trying to control fate Defy
‘I sell thee poison, thou hast sold me none’ (5.1.83) – Believes money to be poison, not death which is a release Sell
‘I beseech thee, youth, put not another sin upon my head’ (5.3.61-62) – imperative, belittling, trying to stop fate Beseech
‘I love thee better than myself’ (5.3.64) – links to ‘which name I tender as dearly as my own’, become less self obsessed Better
‘A dateless bargain to engrossing Death!’ (5.3.115) – capitalisation, personification, ‘dateless’ fate Bargain
‘Thus with a kiss I die’ (5.3.120) – links to ‘one kiss and I’ll descend’ (3.5.42) Kiss
‘It is an honor that i dream not of’ (1.3.67) – Does not wish to get married Honor
‘Then your consent gives strengh to make it fly’ (1.3.100) Consent
‘You kiss by th’book’ (1.5.109,5) – Extended metaphor of perfection and comparing Romeo to Paris Book
‘If he be married my grave is like to be my wedding bed’ (1.5.133) Wedding bed
‘My only love sprung from my only hate’ (1.5.137) Sprung
‘That I must love a loathed enemy’ (1.5.140) – imperative shows fate, no will so no blame, love at first sight Loathed
”Aloft” (2.2.stage direction) – close to the heavens, purity (High up)
‘O Romeo, Romeo, wherefore art thou Romeo?’ (2.2.33) – despair Wherefore
‘I’ll no longer be a capulet’ (2.2.36) Capulet
”Tis but thy name which is my enemy’ (2.2.38) Enemy
‘O be some other name!’ (2.2.42) – frustration Name!
‘That which we call a rose would smell as sweet’ (2.2.44-5) – loves him for himself Rose
‘My ears have yet not drunk a hundred words of thy tongues uttering, yet i know the sound’ (2.2.58-9) – soulmates, fate, perfect match, love at first sight, Drunk
‘And the place of death, considering who thou art’ (2.2.64) – if he stays he’ll die, bringing back to reality Place of death
‘If they do see thee, they will murder thee’ (2.2.70) – more mature, realistic, level headed, worried Murder
‘Dost thou love me?’ (2.2.90) – skeptical, realistic Love?
‘O swear not by the moon, th’inconsistant moon’ (2.2.109) – love will not fade like the moon Moon
‘It is too rash, too unadvised, too sudden’ (2.2.118) – triad contrasting Romeo’s fair/wise, nativity vs maturity, negative, expressing her own desires (Triad)
‘Summer’s ripening breath’ (2.2.121) – metaphor of new blooming love, flowers die, fate Ripening
‘My bounty is as boundless as the sea’ (2.2.133) – shows commitment Bounty
‘Send me word tomorrow’ (2.2.144), committed, eager Tomorrow
‘All my fortunes at thy foot I’ll lay’ (2.2.142) – giving up all for him, dramatic irony, giving up her fate for love Fortunes/foot
‘A thousand times good night!’ (2.2.154,5) Thousand
‘Else I would tear the cave where echo lies’ (2.2.161) Echo
I will not fail, ’tis twenty years till then (2.2.169) – hyperbole, impatient Twenty years
‘How I love thy company’ (2.2.173) Company
‘I should kill thee with much cherishing’ (2.2.183) Kill/cherishing
‘Sweet sorrow’ (2.2.189) Sorrow
‘As Phaëton would whip you west’ (3.2.3) Phaëton
‘Bring in cloudy night immediately’ (3.2.4) Cloudy night
‘If love be blind, it best agrees with night’ (3.2.9-10) – dark side to love, foreshadowing, Cupid blind, fate Blind
‘Come, Night, come, Romeo, come, thou day in night’ (3.2.17) – capitalisation, Romeo linked to darkness, love is doom Night/Romeo
‘Whiter than new snow upon a raven’s back’ (3.2.19) – links to ‘So shows a snowy dove trooping with crows’ (1.5.47), love beautiful but will inevitably melt like snow, fated that good never lasts Snow/raven
‘When I shall die, take him and cut him out in little stars’ (3.2.21-2) – links to ‘Star-crossed lovers’, stars linked with destiny/divination, dramatic irony as romanticised after death, expects to die together Cut
‘To an impatient child that hath new robes and may not wear them’ (3.2.30-1) – cannot be with Romeo even though love Impatient
‘It was the nightingale and not the lark’ (3.5.2) nightingale is eternity of love in contrast to lark symbolising positive dawn (new love) Nightingale/lark
‘Then window, let day in, and let life out’ (3.5.36) – proleptic marker as last time she sees him alive, he throws his life out the window for her Window
‘Thou art so low, as one dead in the bottom of a tomb’ (3.5.55-56) – proleptic marker, kill themselves in Capulet tomb Low/tomb
‘Be fickle fortune’ (3.5.62) – putting faith in fortune but already fated to die Fickle
‘This shall slay them both’ (4.1.59) – foreshadowing, ‘shall’ shows inevitable, fate Slay
‘Be not so long to speak, I long to die’ (4.1.66) – repetition of long, death engulfing her, fate Long
‘What if if be poison?’ (4.3.24) – skeptical of Catholic Church Poison?
‘It was the nightingale and not the lark’ (3.5.2) nightingale is eternity of love in contrast to lark symbolising positive dawn (new love) Nightingale/lark
‘Then window, let day in, and let life out’ (3.5.36) – proleptic marker as last time she sees him alive, he throws his life out the window for her Window
‘Thou art so low, as one dead in the bottom of a tomb’ (3.5.55-56) – proleptic marker, kill themselves in Capulet tomb Low/tomb
‘Be fickle fortune’ (3.5.62) – putting faith in fortune but already fated to die Fickle
‘This shall slay them both’ (4.1.59) – foreshadowing, ‘shall’ shows inevitable, fate Slay
‘Be not so long to speak, I long to die’ (4.1.66) – repetition of long, death engulfing her, fate Long
‘What if it be poison?’ (4.3.24) – skeptical of Catholic Church Poison?
‘If love be rough with you, be rough with love’ (1.4.27) Rough
‘A visor for a visor!’ (1.4.30) Visor
‘We waste our lights in vain’ (1.4.45) In vain
‘Dreamers often lie’ (1.4.51,5) Dreamers
‘The fairies midwife’ (1.4.54) Midwife
‘Through lovers’ brains and then they dream of love’ (1.4.71) Brains
‘Dreams he of cutting foreign throats’ (1.4.83) Cutting
Swears a prayer or two’ (1.4.87) Prayer
‘Plats the manes of horses’ (1.4.89) Plats
‘Which, once untangl’d, much misfortune bodes’ (1.4.91) Untangl’d
‘Pronounce but love and dove’ (2.1.10) Pronounce
‘To raise a spirit in his mistress’ circle’ (2.1.24) Mistress
‘Medlar tree’ (2.1.34) Medlar
‘He is already dead’ (2.4.13) Already
‘More than the Prince of Cats’ (2.4.19) Prince
‘Without his roe, like a dried herring’ (2.4.37) Herring
‘The operation of the second cup draws him on the drawer’ (3.1.7-8) Operation
‘As soon moved to be moody, and as soon moody to be moved’ (3.1.12-13) Moved/moody
‘By my heel, I care not’ (3.1.34) Heel
‘Consort? What, dost thou make us minstrels?’ (3.1.43) ‘Mercutio, thou consortest with Romeo’
‘O calm, dishonourable, vile submission!’ (3.1.70) Submission
‘A plague a’both (your) houses!’ (3.1.87/95/102) (Repetition) M
‘As soon moved to be moody, and as soon moody to be moved’ (3.1.12-13) Moody/moved
I do but keep the peace (1.1.62) Opposite to Tybalt’s constant angerBalancing nature – fateIs genuinely a nice guy
What sadness lengthens Romeo’s hours? (1.1.157) Hours
I will make thee think a swan a crow (1.2.89) Crow
The day is hot, the Capel’s are abroad, and if we meet we shall not escape a brawl (3.1.2-3) Prophetic fallacy showing how everyone is bound to be more irritableIndicates to the audience that the fight is fated to happen’Shall’ expresses absolute certainty in the event taking place
Valiant Paris seeks you for his love (1.3.75) Valiant
A crutch, a crutch! Why call you for a sword? (1.1.70) Crutch
This precious book of love (1.3.88) (Extended metaphor)
Marry (1.3) (Repetition)
He’s a man of wax (Perfect)
Give me my long sword, ho! (1.1.69) Woman whom I love and cherish dearly
Let two more summers wither in their pride (1.2.10) Summers
Woo her, gentle Paris, get her heart (1.2.16) (Considerate)
Welcome gentlemen! (1.5.15) Welcome
She that makes dainty, she I’ll swear hath corns (1.5.18-9) Dainty
Ah, sirrah (1.5.28) Sirrah
‘Tis not so much, ’tis not so much (1.5.33) ‘Tis more, ’tis more
Some five and twenty years (1.5.36) 25
Therefore be patient, take no note of him (1.5.70) Patient
This trick may chance to scathe you (1.5.83) Scathe
What say you to my suit? (1.2.6 Paris) -ownership Suit
Younger than she are happy mothers made (1.2.10 Paris) – stubborn Happy mothers
‘Do you bite your thumb at us sir?’ (1.1.41 Abram) – comedy descends quickly to violence, one way banter Thumb
‘A pair of star-cross’d lovers take their life'(P.6) – fated Star-crossed
‘Civil blood makes civil hands unclean’ (P.4) – violence, religion Civil
‘Bewitched by the charm of looks’ (1.5.149)- Queen mab Bewitched
‘What, drawn and talk of peace? I hate the word as I hate hell, all Montegues, and thee’ (1.1.62-3) Peace
‘Breath’d defiance to my ears’ (1.1.104 Benvolio) – argumentative Defiance
‘I’ll not endure him’ (1.5.56) Endure
‘To flee and scorn at our solemnity’ (1.5.75)- looking for a fight Flee/scorn
‘Now seeming sweet, convert to bitt’rest gall’ (1.5.91) – {forming a personal grudge} Sweet
‘You will give me occasion’ (3.1.40) – imperative, wants to fight, fate Occasion

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