Romeo and Juliet

Juliet “I’ll look to like, if looking liking move; but no more deep will I endart mine eye than your consent gives strength to make it fly”
Juliet “My only love, sprung from my only hate! Too early seen unknown, and known too late! Prodigious birth of love it is to me that I must love a loathed enemy”
Juliet “Thou knowest the mask of night is on my face; else would a maiden blush be paint my cheek for that which thou hast heard me speak tonight. Fain would I dwell on form—fain, fain deny what I have spoke; but farewell compliment! Dost thou love me? I know thou wilt say ‘Ay’; and I will take thy word. Yet, if thou swears, thou mayst prove false. At lovers’ perjuries, they say Jove laughs”
Juliet “Well, do not swear. Although I joy in thee, I have no joy of this contract tonight. It is too rash, too unadvised, too sudden; too like the lightning, which doth cease to be ere one can say ‘It light lightens.’ Sweet, good night! This bud of love, by summer’s ripening breath, may prove a beauteous flow’r when next we meet”
Juliet “But to be frank and give it thee again. And yet I wish but for the thing I have. My bounty is as boundless as the sea, my love as deep; the more I give to thee, the more I have, for both are infinite. I hear some noise within. Dear love, adieu!”
Juliet “‘Tis almost morning, I would have thee gone—and yet no farther than a wanton’s bird, that lets it hop a little from her hand, like a poor prisoner in his twisted gyves, and with a silk thread plucks it back again, so loving-jealous of his liberty”
Juliet “Conceit, more rich in matter than in words, brags of his substance, nor of ornament. They are but beggars that can count their worth; but my true love is grown to such excess I cannot sum up sum of half my wealth”
Juliet “O, break, my heart! Poor bankrout, break at once! To prison, eyes; ne’er look on liberty! Vile earth, to earth resign; end motion here, and thou and Romeo press one heavy bier!”
Juliet “O serpent heart, hid with a flow’ring face! Did ever dragon keep so air a cave? Beautiful tyrant! Fiend angelical! Dove-deathered raven! Wolvish-ravening lamb! Despised substance of divinest show! Just opposite to what hou justly seemst, a damned saint, an honorable villain! O nature, what hadst thou to do in hell when thou didst bower the spirit of a fiend in mortal paradise of such sweet flesh? Was ever book containing such vile matter so fairly bound? O, that deceit should dwell in such a gorgeous palace!”
Juliet “Villain and he be many miles asunder—god pardon him! I do, with all my heart; and yet no man like he doth grieve my heart”
Juliet “Ancient damnation! O most wicked fiend! Is it more sin to wish me thus forsworn, or to dispraise my lord with that same tongue which she hath praised him with above compare so many thousand times? Go, counselor! Thou and my bosom henceforth shall be twain. I’ll to the friar to know his remedy. If all else fail, myself have power to die”
Juliet “Therefore, out of thy long-experienced time, give me some present counsel; or, behold, ‘Twixt my extremes and me this bloody knife shall play the umpire, arbitrating that which the commission of thy years and art could do no issue of true honor bring. Be nor so long to speak. I long to die if what thou speaks speak not of remedy”
Lady Capulet “A crutch, a crutch! Why call you for a sword?”
Lady Capulet “Well, think of marriage now. Younger than you, here in Verona, ladies of esteem, are made already mothers. By my count, I was your mother much upon these years that you are now a maid. Thus then I brief: the valiant Paris seeks you for his love”
Lady Capulet “He is a kinsman to the Montague; affection makes him false, he speaks not true. Some twenty of them fought in this black strife, and all those twenty could but kill one life. I beg for justice, which thou, prince, must give. Rome slew Tybalt; Romeo must not live”
Lady Capulet “Well, well, thou hast a careful father, child; one who, to put thee from thy heaviness, hath sorted out a sudden day of joy that thou expects not nor I looked not for”
Lady Capulet “The tears have got small victory by that, for it was bad enough before their spite”
Lady Capulet “O me, O me! My child, my only life! Revive, look up, or I will die with thee! Help! Help! Call help.”
Lord Capulet “My sword, I say! Old Montague is come, and flourishes his blade in spite of me”
Lord Capulet “In penalty alike; and ’tis not hard, I think, for men so old as we to keep the peace”
Lord Capulet “But saying o’er what I have said before: My child is yet a stranger in the world, she hath not seen the change of fourteen years; let two more summers wither in their pride ere we may think her ripe to be a bride”
Lord Capulet “Content thee, gentle coz, let him alone. ‘A bears him like a portly gentleman, and, to say truth, Verona brags of him to be a virtuous and well-governed youth. I would not for the wealth of all this town here in my house do him disparagement. Therefore be patient, take no note of him. It is my will; the which if thou respect, show a fair presence and put off these frowns, and ill-beseeming semblance for a feast”
Lord Capulet “He shall be endured. What, goodman boy? I say he shall. Go to! Am I the master here, or you? Go to! You’ll not endure him? God shall mend my soul! You’ll make a mutiny among my guests! You will set cock-a-hoop! You’ll be the man”
Lord Capulet “Things have fall’n out, sir, so unluckily that we have had no time to move our daughter. Look you, she loved her kinsman Tybalt dearly, and so did i. well, we were born to die. ’tis very late; she’ll not come down tonight. I promise you, but for your company, I would have been abed an hour ago”
Lord Capulet “Hang thee, young baggage! Disobedient wretch! I tell thee what—get thee to church a Thursday or never after look me in the face. Speak not, reply not, do not answer me! My fingers itch. Wife, we scarce thought us blest that God had lent us but this only child; but now I see this one is one too much, and that we have a curse in having her. Out on her, hilding!
Lord Capulet “Ha! Let me see her. Out alas! She’s cold, her blood is settled, and her joints are stiff; life and these lips have long been separated. Death lies on her like an untimely frost upon the sweetest flower of all the field”
Lord Capulet “Death, that hath ta’en her hence to make me wail, ties up my tongue and will not let me speak”
Tybalt “What, drawn, and talk of peace? I hate the word as I hate hell, all Montagues, and thee”
Nurse “Now, by my maidenhead at twelve year old, I bade her come. What, lamb! What, ladybird! God forbid! Where’s this girl? What, Juliet”
Nurse “I’ll lay fourteen of my teeth—and yet, to my teen be it spoken, I have but four—she’s not fourteen. How long is it now to Lammastide?”
Nurse “My lord and you were then at Mantua—nay, I do bear a brain—but, as I said, when it did taste the worm wood on the nipple of my dug and felt it bitter, pretty fool, to see it tetchy and fall out with the dug! Shake, quoth the dovehouse! ‘Twas no need, I trow, to be me trudge”
Nurse “A man, young lady! Lady, such a man as all the world—why he’s a man of wax”
Nurse “An ‘a speak anything against me. I’ll take him down, an ‘a were lustier than he is, and twenty such Jacks and if I cannot, I’ll find those that shall. Scurvy knave! I am none of his flirt-gills’ I am none of his skainsmates”
Nurse “There’s no trust, no faith, no honesty in men; all perjured, all forsworn, all naught, all dissemblers. Ah, where’s my man? Give me some aqua vitae. These griefs, these woes, these sorrows make me old. Shame come to Romeo!”
romeo “Alas, that Love, whose view is muffled still, should, without eyes, see pathways to his will! Where shall we dine? O me! What fray was here? Yet tell me not, for I have heard it all. Here’s much to do with hate, but more with love. Why, then, O brawling love! O loving hate! O any thing, of nothing first create! O heavy lightness, serious vanity; misshapen chaos of well-seeming forms! Feather of lead, bright smoke, cold fire, sick health! Still-waking sleep, that is not what it is! This love feel I, that feel no love in this. Dost thou not laugh?”
romeo “Well, in that hit you miss. She’ll not be hit with Cupid’s arrow. She hath Dian’s wit; and, in strong proof of chastity well arm’d, from love’s weak childish bow she lives unharmed. She will not stay the siege of loving terms, nor bide the encounter of assailing eyes, nor ope her lap to saint-seducing gold. O, she is rich in beauty, only poor that, when she dies, with beauty dies her store.”
romeo “Not mad, but bound more than a madman is, shut up in prison, kept without my food, whipped and tormented and—God-den, good fellow.”
romeo “Not I, believe me. You have dancing shoes with nimble soles; I have a soul of lead so stakes me to the ground I cannot move”
romeo “By love, that first did prompt me to enquire. He lent me counsel, and I lent him eyes. I am no pilot, yet, wert thou as far as that vast shore washed with the farthest sea. I would adventure for such merchandise”
romeo “As if that name, shot from the deadly level of a gun, did murder her; as that name’s cursed hand murdered her kinsman. O tell me, friar, tell me, in what vile part of this anatomy doth my name lodge? Tell me, that I may sack the hateful mansion”
romeo “But that a joy past joy calls out on me, it were a grief so brief to part with thee. Farewell”
romeo “Is it e’en so? Then I defy you, stars! Thou knowst my lodging. Get me ink and paper and hire posthorses. I will hence tonight”
romeo “Thou detestable maw, thou womb of death, gorged with the dearest morsel of the earth, thus I enforce thy rotten jaws to open, and in despite I’ll cram thee with more food”
Lord Montague Hold me not, let me go”
Lord Montague “Many a morning hath he there been seen, with tears augmenting the fresh morning’s dew, adding to clouds more clouds with his deep sighs. But all so soon as the all0cheering sun should in the farthest east begin to draw the shady curtains from Aurora’s bed, away from light steals home my heavy son, and private in his chamber pens himself, shuts up his windows, locks fair daylight out, and makes himself an artificial night. Black and portentous must this humor prove, unless good counsel may the cause remove”
Romeo “‘Tis the way to call hers (exquisite) in question more. These happy masks that kiss fair ladies’ brows, being black, puts us in mind they hide the fair. He that is stricken blind cannot forget the precious treasure of his eyesight lost. Show me a mistress that is passing fair, what doth her beauty serve but as note where I may read who passed that passing fair? Farewell. Thou canst not teach me to forget”
Lady Montague “thou shalt not stir one foot to seek a foe”
Benvolio “I do but keep the peace. Put up thy sword, or manage it to part these men with me”
Benvolio “Here were the servants of your adversary, and yours, close fighting ere I did approach. I drew to part them; in the instant came the fiery Tybalt, with his sword prepared, which, as he breathed defiance to my ears, he swung about his head and cut the winds, who, nothing hurt withal, hissed him in scorn. While we were interchanging thrusts and blows, came more and more and fought on part and part, till the prince came, who parte either part”
Benvolio “I’ll pay that doctrine, or else die in debt”
Benvolio “Tut, man, one fire burns out another’s burning; one pain is lessened by another’s anguish; turn giddy, and be hold by backward turning; one desperate grief cures with another’s languish. Take thou some new infection to thy eye, and the rank poison of the old will die”
Benvolio “The date is out of such prolixity. We’ll have no Cupid hoodwinked with a scarf, bearing a Tartar’s painted bow of lath, scaring the ladies like a crowkeeper; nor no without-book prologue, faintly spoke after the prompter, for our entrance; but let them measure us by what they will, we’ll measure them a measure, and be gone”
Mercutio “You are a lover. Borrow Cupid’s wings and soar with them above a common bound”
Mercutio “And, to sink in it, should you burden love—to great oppression for a tender thing”
Mercutio “If love be rough with you, be rough with love. Prick love for pricking, and you beat love down. Give me a case to put my visage in. a visor for a visor! What care I what curious eye doth quote deformities? Here are the beetle brows shall blush for me”
Mercutio “I mean, sir in delay we waste our lights in vain, like lamps by day. Take our good meaning, for our judgment sits give times in that ere once in our five wits”
Mercutio “True, I talk of dreams; which are the children of an idle brain, begot of nothing but vain fantasy; which is as thin of substance as the air, and more inconstant than the wind, who woos even now the frozen bosom of the Noth and, being angered, puffs away from thence. Turning his face to the dew-dropping South”
Mercutio “If love be blind, love cannot hit the mark. Now will he sit under a medlar tree and wish his mistress were that kind of fruit as maids call medlars when they laugh alone. Oh, Romeo, that she were, O, that she were an open et cetera, thou a pop’rin pear! Romeo, good night. I’ll to my truckle bed; this field-bed is too cold for me to sleep. Come, shall we go?”
Mercutio “Alas, poor Romeo, he is already dead! Stabbed with a white wench’s black eye; shot through the ear with a love song; the very pin of his heart cleft with the blind bow-boy’s butt-shaft; and is he a man to encounter Tybalt?”
prince “Of honorable reckoning are you both, and pity ’tis you lived at odds so long”
Paris Speaker?”Younger than she are happy mothers made”
Paris “Immoderately she weeps for Tybalt’s death, and therefore have I little talked of love; for Venus smiles not in a house of tears. Now, sir, her father counts it dangerous that she do give her sorrow so much swat, and in his wisdom hastes our marriage to stop the inundation of her tears, which, too much minded by herself alone, may be put from her by society. Now do you know the reason of this haste.”
Paris “Give me thy torch, boy. Hence, and stand aloof. Yet put it out, for I would not be seen. Under yond yew tree lay thee all along, holding thine ear close to the hollow ground so shall no foot upon the churchyard tread (being loose, unfirm, with digging up of graves) but thou shalt hear it. Whistle then to me, as a signal that thou hearst something approach. Give me those flowers. Do as I bid thee, go”
Paris “Sweet flower, with flowers thy bridal bed I strew (O woe! Thy canopy is dust and stones) which with sweet water nightly I will dew; or, wanting that, with tears distilled by moans. The obsequies that I for thee will keep nightly shall be to strew thy grave and weep”
Paris “This is that banish’d haughty Montague that murdered my love’s cousin—with which grief is it supposed the fair creature died—and here is come to do some villainous shame to the dead bodies. I will apprehend him. Stop thy unhallowed toil, vile Montague! Can vengeance be pursued further than death? Condemned villain, I do apprehend thee. Obey, and go with me; for thou must die”
Prince “Seal up the mouth of outrage for a while, till we can clear these ambiguities and know their spring, their head, their true descent; and then will I be general of your woes and lead you even to death. Meantime forbear, and let mischance be slave to patience. Bring forth the parties of suspicion”
Prince “A glooming peace this morning with it brings. The sun for sorrow will not show his head. Go hence, to have more talk of these sad things; some shall be pardoned, and some punished; for never was a story of more woe than this of Juliet and Romeo”
Friar Laurence “Young men’s love then lies not truly in their hearts, but in their eyes.”
Friar Laurence “How much salt water thrown away in waste, to season love, that of it doth not taste! The sun not yet thy sighs form heaven clears, thy old groans ring yet in mine ancient ears. Lo, here upon thy cheek the stain doth sit of an old tear that is not washed off yet. If e’er thou wast thyself, and these wose thine, thou and these woes were all for Rosaline. And art thou changed? Pronounce this sentence then: Women may fall when there’s no strength in men”
Friar Laurence “Go hence, good night; and here stands all your state: either be gone before the watch be set, or by the break of day disguised from hence, sojourn in Mantua. I’ll find out your man, and he shall signify from time to time every good hap to you that chances here. Give me thy hand, ’tis late. Farewell; good night”
Friar Laurence “Unhappy fortune! By my brotherhood, the letter was not nice, but full of charge, of dear import, and the neglecting it may do much danger”
Friar Laurence “I hear some noise. Lady, come from that nest of death, contagion, and unnatural sleep. A greater power than we can contradict hath thwarted our intents. Come, come away. Thy husband in thy bosom there lies dead; and Paris too. Come, I’ll dispose of thee among a sisterhood of holy nuns. Stay not to question, for the watch is coming. Come, go, good Juliet. I dare no longer stay”
Friar Laurence “I am the greatest, able to do least, yet most suspected, as the time and place doth make against me, of this direful murder; and here I stand, both to impeach and purge myself condemned and myself excused”
Mercutio Who gives the Queen Mab Speech?
Romeo “Alas, that Love, whose view is muffled still, should, without eyes, see pathways to his will! Where shall we dine? O me! What fray was here? Yet tell me not, for I have heard it all. Here’s much to do with hate, but more with love. Why, then, O brawling love! O loving hate! O any thing, of nothing first create! O heavy lightness, serious vanity; misshapen chaos of well-seeming forms! Feather of lead, bright smoke, cold fire, sick health! Still-waking sleep, that is not what it is! This love feel I, that feel no love in this. Dost thou not laugh?”
Romeo “Well, in that hit you miss. She’ll not be hit with Cupid’s arrow. She hath Dian’s wit; and, in strong proof of chastity well arm’d, from love’s weak childish bow she lives unharmed. She will not stay the siege of loving terms, nor bide the encounter of assailing eyes, nor ope her lap to saint-seducing gold. O, she is rich in beauty, only poor that, when she dies, with beauty dies her store.”
Romeo “Not mad, but bound more than a madman is, shut up in prison, kept without my food, whipped and tormented and—God-den, good fellow.”
Romeo “Not I, believe me. You have dancing shoes with nimble soles; I have a soul of lead so stakes me to the ground I cannot move”
Romeo “By love, that first did prompt me to enquire. He lent me counsel, and I lent him eyes. I am no pilot, yet, wert thou as far as that vast shore washed with the farthest sea. I would adventure for such merchandise”
Romeo “As if that name, shot from the deadly level of a gun, did murder her; as that name’s cursed hand murdered her kinsman. O tell me, friar, tell me, in what vile part of this anatomy doth my name lodge? Tell me, that I may sack the hateful mansion”
Romeo “But that a joy past joy calls out on me, it were a grief so brief to part with thee. Farewell”
Romeo “Is it e’en so? Then I defy you, stars! Thou knowst my lodging. Get me ink and paper and hire posthorses. I will hence tonight”
Romeo “Thou detestable maw, thou womb of death, gorged with the dearest morsel of the earth, thus I enforce thy rotten jaws to open, and in despite I’ll cram thee with more food”
Romeo ” Here’s much to do with hate, but more with love. Why, the, o brawling love! O loving hate! O anything, of nothing first create! O heavy lightness, serious vanity, misshapen chaos of well-seeming forms! Feather of lead, bright smoke, cold fire, sick health! Still-waking sleep, that is not what it is! This love feel I, that is not what it is! This love feel I, that feel no love in this. Dost thou not laugh?”
Romeo “I fear, too early; for my mind misgives some consequence, yet hanging in the stars, shall bitterly begin his fearful date with this night’s revels and expire the term of a despised life, closed in my breast by some vile forfeit of untimely death. But he that hath the steerage of my course direct my sail!”
Romeo ” O, she doth teach the torches to burn bright! It seems she hangs upon the cheek of night like a rich jewel in an Ethiop’s ear- beauty too rich for use, for earth too dear! So shows a snowy dove trooping with crows as younder lady o’er her fellows shows. The measure done, I’ll watch her place of stand and, touching hers, make blessed my rude hand. Did my heart love till now? Forswear it, sight! For I ne’er saw true beauty till this night” (about Juliet)
Romeo ” If I profane with my unworthiest hand this holy shrine, the gentle fine is this; my lips, two blushing pilgrims, ready stand to smooth that rough touch with a gentle kiss”
Romeo “o, then dear saint, let lips do what hands do! They pray; grant thou , lest faith turn to despair”
Romeo “sin from my lips? O trespass sweetly urged! Give me my sin again”
Romeo But, soft! what light through yonder window breaks?It is the east, and Juliet is the sun.Arise, fair sun, and kill the envious moon,
Romeo I am too bold, ’tis not to me she speaks:Two of the fairest stars in all the heaven,Having some business, do entreat her eyesTo twinkle in their spheres till they return.What if her eyes were there, they in her head?The brightness of her cheek would shame those stars, As daylight doth a lamp; her eyes in heavenWould through the airy region stream so brightThat birds would sing and think it were not night.
Romeo By a nameI know not how to tell thee who I am:My name, dear saint, is hateful to myself,Because it is an enemy to thee;Had I it written, I would tear the word.
Romeo With love’s light wings did I o’er-perch these walls;For stony limits cannot hold love out,And what love can do that dares love attempt;Therefore thy kinsmen are no let to me.
Romeo I have night’s cloak to hide me from their sight;And but thou love me, let them find me here:My life were better ended by their hate,Than death prorogued, wanting of thy love.
Romeo I’ll tell thee, ere thou ask it me again.I have been feasting with mine enemy,Where on a sudden one hath wounded me,That’s by me wounded: both our remediesWithin thy help and holy physic lies:I bear no hatred, blessed man, for, lo,My intercession likewise steads my foe.
Romeo Then plainly know my heart’s dear love is setOn the fair daughter of rich Capulet:As mine on hers, so hers is set on mine;And all combined, save what thou must combineBy holy marriage: when and where and howWe met, we woo’d and made exchange of vow,I’ll tell thee as we pass; but this I pray,That thou consent to marry us to-day.
Romeo “I pray thee, chide not; she whom I love nowDoth grace for grace and love for love allow;The other did not so.”
Romeo “There is no world without Verona walls, but purgatory, torture, hell itself”
Romeo “heaven is here, where Juliet lives; and every cat and dog and little mouse, every unworthy thing, live here in heaven and may look on her; but romeo may not”
Romeo “doth not she think me an old murderer, now I have stained the childhood of our joy with blood removed but little from her own? Where is she and how doth she? And what says my concealed lady to our canceled love?”
Romeo “I have more care to stay than will to go, come, death, and welcome, Juliet wills it so, how ist my soul? Let’s talk; it is not day”
Romeo “and trust me, love, in my eye so do you, dry sorrow drinks our blood”
Romeo Is it even so? then I defy you, stars!Thou know’st my lodging: get me ink and paper,And hire post-horses; I will hence to-night.
Romeo There is thy gold, worse poison to men’s souls,Doing more murders in this loathsome world,Than these poor compounds that thou mayst not sell.I sell thee poison; thou hast sold me none.Farewell: buy food, and get thyself in flesh.Come, cordial and not poison, go with meTo Juliet’s grave; for there must I use thee
Romeo In faith, I will. Let me peruse this face.Mercutio’s kinsman, noble County Paris!What said my man, when my betossed soulDid not attend him as we rode? I thinkHe told me Paris should have married Juliet:Said he not so? or did I dream it so?Or am I mad, hearing him talk of Juliet,
Romeo O my love! my wife!Death, that hath suck’d the honey of thy breath,Hath had no power yet upon thy beauty:Thou art not conquer’d; beauty’s ensign yetIs crimson in thy lips and in thy cheeks,And death’s pale flag is not advanced there.
Juliet ” I’ll look to like, if looking liking move, but no more deep will I endart mine eye than your consent gives strength to make it fly”
Juliet “good pilgrim, you do wrong your hand too much, which mannerly devotion shows in this; for saints have hands that pilgrims’ hands do touch, and palm in holy palmer’s kiss.”
Juliet “then have my lips the sin that they have took.”
Juliet “go ask his name – if he be married, my grave is like to be my wedding bed”
Juliet “My only love, sprung from my only hate, too early seen unknown, and known too late, prodigious birth of love it is to me that I must love a loathed enemy”
Juliet O Romeo, Romeo! wherefore art thou Romeo?Deny thy father and refuse thy name;Or, if thou wilt not, be but sworn my love,And I’ll no longer be a Capulet.
Juliet ‘Tis but thy name that is my enemy;Thou art thyself, though not a Montague.What’s Montague? it is nor hand, nor foot,Nor arm, nor face, nor any other partBelonging to a man. O, be some other name!What’s in a name? that which we call a roseBy any other name would smell as sweet;So Romeo would, were he not Romeo call’d,Retain that dear perfection which he owesWithout that title. Romeo, doff thy name,And for that name which is no part of theeTake all myself.
Juliet How camest thou hither, tell me, and wherefore?The orchard walls are high and hard to climb,And the place death, considering who thou art,If any of my kinsmen find thee here
Juliet Dost thou love me? I know thou wilt say ‘Ay,’And I will take thy word: yet if thou swear’st,Thou mayst prove false; at lovers’ perjuriesThen say, Jove laughs. O gentle Romeo,If thou dost love, pronounce it faithfully:Or if thou think’st I am too quickly won,I’ll frown and be perverse an say thee nay,
Juliet O, swear not by the moon, the inconstant moon,That monthly changes in her circled orb,Lest that thy love prove likewise variable
Juliet My bounty is as boundless as the sea,My love as deep; the more I give to thee,The more I have, for both are infinite
Juliet Give me my Romeo; and, when he shall die,Take him and cut him out in little stars,And he will make the face of heaven so fineThat all the world will be in love with night
Juliet “Gallop apace, you fiery-footed steeds, Toward Phoebus’ lodging! Such a wagoner as phaeton would whip you to the west”
Juliet “Lovers can see to do their amorous rites by their own beauties’ or if love be blind, it best agrees with night.”
Juliet “Beautiful tyrant! Fiend angelical! Dove-feathered raven! Wolvish-ravening lamb! Despised substance of divinest show! Just opposite to what thou justly seemst, a damned saint, an honorable villain?”
Juliet “blistered be thy tongue for such a wish! He was not born to shame, upon his brow shame is ashamed to sit; for tis a throne where honor may be crowned sole monarch of the universal earth, o what a beast was I to chide at him”
Juliet “tybalt is dead, and Romeo – banished, that ‘banished’, that one word ‘banished’ hath slain ten thousand Tybalts”
Juliet “He made you for a highway to my bed; but I, maid, die maiden-widowed. Come, cords; come, nurse, I’ll go to my wedding bed; and death, not romeo, take my maidenhead.”
Juliet ” wilt thou be gone? It is not yet near day. It was the nightingale, and not the lark, that pierced the fearful hollow of thine ear.”
Juliet “o God, I have an ill divining soul, methinks I see thee, now thou art below, as one dead in the bottom of a tomb, either my eyesight fails, or thou lookst pale.”
Juliet “indeed I never shall be satisfied with romeo till I behold him – dead- is my poor heart so for a kinsman vexed. Madam if you could find out but a man to bear a poison, I would temper it; that romeo should, upon receipt therof, soon sleep in quiet”
Juliet “my husband is on earth, my faith in heaven”
Juliet O, bid me leap, rather than marry Paris,From off the battlements of yonder tower;Or walk in thievish ways; or bid me lurkWhere serpents are; chain me with roaring bears;Or shut me nightly in a charnel-house,O’er-cover’d quite with dead men’s rattling bones,With reeky shanks and yellow chapless skulls;Or bid me go into a new-made graveAnd hide me with a dead man in his shroud;Things that, to hear them told, have made me tremble;And I will do it without fear or doubt,To live an unstain’d wife to my sweet love.
Juliet What’s here? a cup, closed in my true love’s hand?Poison, I see, hath been his timeless end:O churl! drunk all, and left no friendly dropTo help me after? I will kiss thy lips;Haply some poison yet doth hang on them,To make die with a restorative.
to find Romeo What does Benvolio promise Lord and Lady Montague?
she has decided to take the chaste life What reason does Rosaline give Romeo for why she can’t love him back?
He tells her that she is too young and that Paris will have to win her over because it is her choice. What does Lord Capulet tell Paris when he asks for Juliet’s hand in marriage?
Rosaline If Juliet is the sun, who is the moon?
he calls himself “saint” How does Romeo let himself be known to Juliet while she’s on the balcony?
He talks in poetry and adds oxymoron to make his dream sound much more detailed than it could’ve been. He also uses inverted text to make sure he rhymes, and gets his point across. How is Romeo’s dream in this scene prophetic?
He doesn’t morally think he should do this, but he is so poor “poverty” that he has to take the money. What does the apothecary mean when he says “My poverty, but not my will, consents”?
He sent the letter via Friar John. But Friar John had to be quarantined because he was thought to have been subject to getting the plague. So he was quarantined and the letter couldn’t be given. Why doesn’t Friar Laurence’s letter reach Romeo in Mantua? How does this add to the tragic outcome of the play?
He chose to do it at this time, because it now makes you feel sorry for Paris, and then when Paris dies, it only makes you feel more emotionally attached to another person that dies. Already putting you in a sad state of mind for when the main characters die, it only adds to the sadness that you are already feeling when Romeo and Juliet die. Why do you think Shakespeare chooses to reveal Paris’ true feelings for Juliet at this time? Why not earlier in the play? How does it add to the emotional impact of this scene?
He needs an excuse to get into the grave. It would be weird if he told him the real reason, and Balthazar would probably go to get help if he knew the real reason. Why does Romeo lie to Balthazar about the ring?
He means that Paris is dead and Romeo killed him. Romeo refers to himself as a “dead man interred” because he will eventually die and he is practically dead at this point because he does not have Juliet What does Romeo mean when he says; “Death thou art by a dead man interred”?
The stars don’t want to the young people to be together, (star-crossed lovers) so he is basically telling them that they will be together, because he is going to kill himself so that they can be together. What does Romeo mean when he says that he will “shake the yoke of inauspicious stars” in this scene?
Once she decides on what she’s going to do, she does it. Her death is actually out of character because we know Juliet to be this practical person that would think of the best way to handle this, and not to jump into things that won’t do any good for anybody. How is Juliet’s death characteristic of her? In what ways is it out of character as we know her?

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