Romeo and Juliet

Soliloquy a speech an actor gives when they are alone, as though talking to himself or herself, that often reveal their innermost thoughts or feelings. Example: Romeo starts his famous soliloquy about Juliet with the words, “But soft, what light through yonder window breaks”(II.ii.2). He is speaking to himself about Juliet. Juliet starts her famous soliloquy about Romeo, “O Romeo, Romeo! Wherefore art thou Romeo?”
Irony What results when the actual outcome differs from what is expected
Aside words spoken by an actor that is mean to be heard only by the audience Example: Romeo uses asides as he is listening to Juliet’s soliloquy in Act 2, Scene 2. In line 27, he says, “She speaks.” He is not talking to Juliet, the only other person on stage. Only the audience is intended to hear this line.
Pun plays on the multiple meanings of words in order to make a joke. Example: Many of the puns in Romeo and Juliet go over our heads today because jokes go out of fashion very quickly and some of Shakespeare’s wordplay involves words we don’t use today. Mercutio is the best punster in the play, though Romeo does pretty well in Act II, when he matches wits with his friend. When Mercutio spies Romeo coming down the street, he says Romeo comes “without his roe.” Roe can refer to a female deer, so if Romeo is without his roe, he’s without his girl. Roe also refers to fish eggs, so “without his roe” can mean that Romeo’s been gutted (we’d say he’s “gutless”), as a fish is when its eggs are removed.
Blank verse Unrhymed iambic pentameter example: the prologue
Prologue A brief summary that is found at the begging of a story or play
Couplet Two following sentences that rhyme at the end example: the prologue usually has couplets or at the end of acts or scenes
Foreshadowing Hinting towards a future event example: tybalt calling revenge on Romeo, Example: Many of the puns in Romeo and Juliet go over our heads today because jokes go out of fashion very quickly and some of Shakespeare’s wordplay involves words we don’t use today. Mercutio is the best punster in the play, though Romeo does pretty well in Act II, when he matches wits with his friend. When Mercutio spies Romeo coming down the street, he says Romeo comes “without his roe.” Roe can refer to a female deer, so if Romeo is without his roe, he’s without his girl. Roe also refers to fish eggs, so “without his roe” can mean that Romeo’s been gutted (we’d say he’s “gutless”), as a fish is when its eggs are removed.
Oxymoron Combination of contradictory terms Example: In Act I Scene 1, Benvolio tries to find out why Romeo is sleeping all day and wandering around all night. Romeo declares/uses oxymorons – “loving hate”, “heavy lightness”, “cold fire”— as a way to describe his love-sickness and confusion about his feelings for Rosaline.
Forebodings Feeling like something bad is gonna happen example: Romeo ,before the couplets party, thinks that this might be the day he dies
Comic relief After emotion scene, author gives a humorous or comedy relief to balance example: sergeants rushing and Fallon after Romeo and mercuric were fighting. After feast when Juliet and Romeo met, Benvolio and mercy too are drunk on the streets making fun of Romeo. After tybalt challenges Romeo to a duel, nurse and mercurial and benvolio bicker.
Chance happening If something didn’t happen it would change story example: Romeo wasn’t at the right so benvolio and to find Romeo if benvolio didn’t find Romero and found out about Rosalind they wouldn’t of started looking for a new girl if they didn’t they wouldn’t of seen Peter if they didn’t see Peter they never would of known and gone to the capulets party if they never went to the party they never would of seen Juliet
Light and dark imagery Happy or upsetting comparisons example: when Romeo compares Juliet to the sun, angel

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