Macbeth Quote Analysis

If it were done when ’tis done, then ’twere well/ It were done quickly” (I.7.1-2). Identify the speaker:MacbethExplain who is being spoken TO or spoken ABOUT: Soliloquy about killing DuncanDescribe what’s happening in the play when the words are spoken: Macbeth is struggling with his decision about killing Duncan.Quote Analysis: These lines reveal that Macbeth has a conscience, as he grapples with whether or not he should kill Duncan. However, they also show that he may allow his ambition to override his conscience. If the negative consequences would end as soon as Duncan was killed, Macbeth would feel much better about killing him.
“What beast was’t then/That made you break this enterprise to me?/And to be more than what you were, you would/Be so much more than man. Nor time, nor place/Did then adhere, and yet you would make both” (I.7.47-50). Identify the speaker: Lady MacbethExplain who is being spoken TO or spoken ABOUT: Macbeth Describe what’s happening in the play when the words are spoken: He will have to be more responsible. He will have more jobs to do.Quote Analysis: These lines reveal that Lady Macbeth tries to tell Macbeth that he should and will change in the future. He will have to become more responsible. He would have more stuff to do, so he will forget about how he killed Duncan.
“Is this a dagger which I see before me,/ The handle toward my hand? Come, let me clutch thee:/I have thee not, and yet I see thee still” (II.1.33-35). Identify the speaker: MacbethExplain who is being spoken TO or spoken ABOUT: Servant…To himselfDescribe what’s happening in the play when the words are spoken: He is saying, “Is this a dagger? Or am I hallucinating? I see the dagger, but it’s not really there.” Quote Analysis: Macbeth is talking to himself and and he started freaking out which made him hallucinate because he is feeling guilty about killing Duncan. And when Macbeth is looking at the weapon he killed Duncan with, he thinks he sees the Dagger, but he can’t touch it.
“But screw your courage to the sticking-place,/ And we’ll not fail. When Duncan is asleep,/Whereto the rather shall his day’s hard journey/Soundly invite him, his two chamberlains Will I with wine and wassail so convince/That memory, the warder of the brain,/Shall be a fume, and the receipt of reason/A limebeck only” (I.7.60-67). Identify the speaker: Lady MacbethExplain who is being spoken TO or spoken ABOUT: MacbethDescribe what’s happening in the play when the words are spoken: Macbeth decides that it’s probably not a good idea to commit murder. He has no cause to kill the king and he admits that he’s ambitious. And then Lady Macbeth enters. She questions his manhood, and lays out the plan to get Duncan’s guards drunk and frame them for the murder.Quote Analysis: Lady Macbeth is basically saying, Only fix your courage firmly in place so it can’t move, and we’ll not fail. I would be delighted to invite him, and his two bodyguards. Will I with wine and drinking so overpower. That memory, the guard/keeper of the brain, Shall be from fumes from alcohol will cause them to be drunk. We will only use the device used in distilling alcohol. Then they’ll be in a deep pig snoring sleep.
In Act 3 Scene 4, lines 16-28, what happened to Fleance and Banquo? Fleance has escaped and Banquo is dead in a ditch with cuts on his head.

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