Macbeth OE; Reoccurring Terms

Morality “Morality is the sense of right and wrong…”
Mao’s Moral Approach “[Mao/In Mao’s case, he] believes the knowledge of right and wrong derives from the effects of the action in relation to the benefit or harm to the actor–a consequential approach to morality”
Macbeth’s Change in Approach “Depending on the point in the play, Macbeth takes on either a deontological or consequential approach” “After believing to have been confirmed his invincibility through a second prophesy by the witches, Macbeth decides to allow the ‘firstlings of [his] heart [to] be the firstlings of [his] hands'”
Macbeth’s Approach-Thane/Subject “As a noble thane and a citizen of Scotland, Macbeth first appears moral deontologically, fulfilling ‘duties…to [King Duncan’s] throne’ [–attempting to rid all disloyal subjects]”
Macbeth’s Approach- After 2nd Aparition “After believing to have been confirmed his invincibility through a second prophesy by the witches, Macbeth decides to allow [the ‘firstlings of [his] heart [to] be the firstlings of [his] hands’/’conscience [to] restrain [his] impulses,’ rather than oppose]”
Deontological vs Consequential Approach “[Morality is the sense of right and wrong,] whether this sense comes from an obligation to authority, known as the deontological approach, or from the consequences of an action, a consequential approach”
Morality in Consideration “When knowing right from wrong, one has a choice–to act morally, ‘right,’ or immorally, ‘wrong.'”
Morality Not Applied “There are actions however where its morality is not determined by the actor’s sense–known as amoral and nonmoral actions”
Conscience vs Impulse “Both impulse and conscience prompt an individual to act–whether involuntarily, impulse, or with consideration of right and wrong, conscience. [In Mao’s opinion, conscience should only “restrain [one’s desired actions,] not oppose.”]

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