Macbeth Act 2 Quote Quiz

TRANSLATION OF: “Is this a dagger which I see before me,The handle toward my hand? Come, let me clutch thee.I have thee not, and yet I see thee still.Art thou not, fatal vision, sensibleTo feeling as to sight? Or art thou butA dagger of the mind, a false creation,Proceeding from the heat-oppress├Ęd brain?” Is this a dagger I see in front of me, with its handle pointing toward my hand? (to the dagger) Come, let me hold you. (he grabs at the air in front of him without touching anything) I don’t have you but I can still see you. Fateful apparition, isn’t it possible to touch you as well as see you? Or are you nothing more than a dagger created by the mind, a hallucination from my fevered brain?
WHO SAID “Is this a dagger which I see before me,The handle toward my hand?” AND TWO WHOM Macbeth to himself: soliloquy
TRANSLATION OF: “Alack, I am afraid they have awaked,And ’tis not done. Th’ attempt and not the deedConfounds us. Hark! I laid their daggers ready;He could not miss ’em. Had he not resembledMy father as he slept, I had done ‘t.” Oh no, I’m afraid the servants woke up, and the murder didn’t happen. For us to attempt murder and not succeed would ruin us. (She hears a noise.) Listen to that! I put the servants’ daggers where Macbeth would find them. He couldn’t have missed them. If Duncan hadn’t reminded me of my father when I saw him sleeping, I would have killed him myself.
WHO SAID “Alack, I am afraid they have awaked,And ’tis not done. ” AND TO WHOM Lady Macbeth to herself: aside when she hears Macbeth offstage
TRANSLATION OF: Methought I heard a voice cry, “Sleep no more!Macbeth does murder sleep”…Still it cried, “Sleep no more!” to all the house.”Glamis hath murdered sleep, and therefore CawdorShall sleep no more. Macbeth shall sleep no more.” I thought I heard a voice cry, “Sleep no more! Macbeth is murdering sleep.” … The voice kept crying, “Sleep no more!” to everyone in the house. “Macbeth has murdered sleep, and therefore Macbeth will sleep no more.”
WHO SAID Methought I heard a voice cry, “Sleep no more!Macbeth does murder sleep” AND TO WHOM Macbeth to Lady Macbeth
TRANSLATION OF: Infirm of purpose!Give me the daggers. The sleeping and the deadAre but as pictures. Coward! Give me the daggers. Dead and sleeping people can’t hurt you any more than pictures can.
WHO SAID Infirm of purpose!Give me the daggers AND TO WHOM Lady Macbeth to Macbeth
TRANSLATION OF: How is ‘t with me when every noise appals me?What hands are here? Ha! They pluck out mine eyes.Will all great Neptune’s ocean wash this bloodClean from my hand? No, this my hand will ratherThe multitudinous seas incarnadine,Making the green one red. What’s happening to me, that I’m frightened of every noise? (looking at his hands) Whose hands are these? Ha! They’re plucking out my eyes. Will all the water in the ocean wash this blood from my hands? No, instead my hands will stain the seas scarlet, turning the green waters red.
WHO SAID How is ‘t with me when every noise appals me? AND TO WHOM Macbeth to himself: soliloquy
TRANSLATION OF My hands are of your color, but I shameTo wear a heart so white My hands are as red as yours, but I would be ashamed if my heart were as pale and weak.
WHO SAID: My hands are of your color, but I shameTo wear a heart so white AND TO WHOM Lady Macbeth to Macbeth
TRANSLATION OF: The night has been unruly. Where we lay,Our chimneys were blown down and, as they say,Lamentings heard i’ th’ air, strange screams of death,And prophesying with accents terribleOf dire combustion and confused eventsNew hatched to the woeful time. The obscure birdClamored the livelong night. Some say the EarthWas feverous and did shake. The night has been chaotic. The wind blew down through the chimneys where we were sleeping. People are saying they heard cries of grief in the air, strange screams of death, and terrible voices predicting catastrophes that will usher in a woeful new age. The owl made noise all night. Some people say that the earth shook as if it had a fever.
WHO SAID The night has been unruly. Where we lay,Our chimneys were blown down and, as they say, AND TO WHOM Lennox to Macbeth
TRANSLATION OF: To Ireland, I. Our separated fortuneShall keep us both the safer. Where we are,There’s daggers in men’s smiles. The near in blood,The nearer bloody. I’ll go to Ireland. We’ll both be safer if we go separate ways. Wherever we go, men will smile at us while hiding daggers. Our closest relatives are the ones most likely to murder us.
WHO SAID To Ireland, I. Our separated fortune AND TO WHOM Donalbain to Malcom
TRANSLATION OF Well, may you see things well done there. Adieu,Lest our old robes sit easier than our new! I hope things go well there. Good-bye! And let’s hope things don’t get worse.
WHO SAID Well, may you see things well done there. Adieu, AND TO WHOM Macduff to Ross

You Might Also Like