Macbeth 13. Act II, Scene I

Is this a dagger which I see before me, the handle toward my hand? [He speaks to the dagger] Come, let me clutch thee. Is this a dagger I see before me, the handle toward my hand? [He speaks to the dagger] Come, let me hold you.
I have thee not, and yet I see thee still. I cannot hold you, yet I see you all the time (it is only a vision).
Art thou not, fatal vision, sensible to feeling as to sight? Are you not, fatal vision, perceivable to the sense of touch as to sight (can you be touched as well as seen)?
or art thou but a dagger of the mind, a false creation, proceeding from the heat-oppressed brain? or are you simply an imaginary dagger, a deceitful creation, coming from my fevered brain?
I see thee yet, in form as palpable as this which now I draw. I still see you, in form as tangible as this (i.e. a real dagger, his own) which I now draw.
Thou marshall’st me the way that I was going; and such an instrument I was to use. You guide me along the way (to the room where Duncan is sleeping) that I was going; and such an instrument I was to use (an instrument of this sort, i.e. the dagger).
Mine eyes are made the fools o’ the other senses, or else worth all the rest; I see thee still, and on thy blade and dudgeon gouts of blood, which was not so before. My eyes are either deceived by (made the fools o’) the other senses, or more trustworthy than all of them;
There’s no such thing: it is the bloody business which informs thus to mine eyes. There’s no such thing: it is the bloody business which takes this shape to my eyes.
Now o’er the one halfworld nature seems dead, and wicked dreams abuse the curtain’d sleep; Now over that half world (hemisphere where it is night) nature seems dead, and wicked dreams deceive the privacy of sleep;
witchcraft celebrates pale Hecate’s offerings, and wither’d Murder, alarum’d by his sentinel, the wolf, whose howl’s his watch, thus with his stealthy pace. witchcraft celebrates pale Hecate’s offerings (i.e. offerings in ceremonies to Hecate, the goddess of witchcraft), and withered Murder (murder is personified), alarmed by his sentinel, the wolf, whose howl is his watch (i.e. the wolf’s howl is the murderer’s “watch”: like a watchman, it tells him how the night is passing), this with his stealthy pace.
With Tarquin’s ravishing strides, towards his design moves like a ghost. With swift, silent steps such as Tarquin made (The story of Tarquin, going secretly in the night to ravish the beautiful Lucrece, his hostess and the wife of his friend, comes from Roman history. It is also the subject of Shakespeare’s poem, “The Rape of Lucrece”.), towards what he plans to do he moves like a ghost (“Moves like a ghost” completes the sentence whose subject is withered murder).
Thou sure and firm-set earth, hear not my steps, which way they walk, for fear thy very stones prate of my whereabout, and take the present horror from the time, which now suits with it. You safe and firm-set earth, hear not my steps, which way they walk, for fear your very stones talk of the place where I am, and (for fear that the stones) seperate the horror of the moment (the murder) from the genereal situation (the time), which is now suitable for it (suits with it).
Whiles I threat, he lives: words to the heat of deeds too cold breath gives. [A bell rings] While I threaten, he lives: words (alone) give breath which is too cold for the heat of deeds (deeds are “hot”, mere talking about them is “cold”).
I go, and it is done; the bell invites me. I go and then it will be done, the bell calls me.
Hear it not, Duncan; for it is a knell that summons thee to heaven or to hell. Do not hear it Duncan; because it is a knell (death bell) that summons you either to heaven or hell.

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