Literary Devices in Romeo and Juliet, Part 5

In Act III, scene i of Romeo and Juliet, Tybalt returns to the scene after he has killed Mercutio and fled. What motivates his return? his hatred for the entire Montague family
In Act III, scene i of Romeo and Juliet, _____ motivates Mercutio to draw his sword on Tybalt when Romeo will not. anger
Read the excerpt from Act III, scene i of Romeo and Juliet.Benvolio: I pray thee, good Mercutio, let’s retire:The day is hot, the Capulets abroad,And, if we meet, we shall not ‘scape a brawl;For now, these hot days, is the mad blood stirring.Mercutio: Thou art like one of those fellows that when he enters the confines of a tavern claps me his sword upon the table and says, ‘God send me no need of thee!’ and by the operation of the second cup draws him on the drawer, when, indeed, there is no need.Benvolio: Am I like such a fellow?Mercutio: Come, come, thou art as hot a Jack in thy mood as any in Italy; and as soon moved to be moody, and as soon moody to be moved.Which detail from the excerpt most foreshadows that Benvolio and Mercutio will fight the Capulets? Benvolio’s urgent request that they go home
Read the nurse’s words to Juliet from Act II, scene v of Romeo and Juliet.Nurse: Your love says, like an honest gentleman, and a courteous, and a kind, and a handsome, and, I warrant, a virtuous,—Where is your mother?Juliet: Where is my mother! why, she is within;Where should she be? How oddly thou repliest:’Your love says, like an honest gentleman,Where is your mother?’Based on your knowledge of the characters, what does the nurse’s question most likely foreshadow? that what the nurse is about to share may have very serious consequences
What literary device consists of a pair of contradictory words or ideas?a(n) oxymoron
Read the excerpt from Act III, scene i of Romeo and Juliet.Benvolio: I pray thee, good Mercutio, let’s retire:The day is hot, the Capulets abroad,And, if we meet, we shall not ‘scape a brawl;For now, these hot days, is the mad blood stirring.What motivates Benvolio to utter this warning? his desire to avoid a fight
Read the excerpt from Act II, scene v of Romeo and Juliet.Friar Laurence: These violent delights have violent ends,And in their triumph die, like fire and powder,Which, as they kiss consume: the sweetest honeyIs loathsome in his own deliciousnessAnd in the taste confounds the appetite:Therefore love moderately; long love doth so;Too swift arrives as tardy as too slow.What do the oxymoron and paradox in this excerpt illustrate about love? NOT True love causes one to lose the ability to reason.
Read the excerpt from Act III, scene i of Romeo and Juliet.Mercutio: Help me into some house, Benvolio,Or I shall faint. A plague o’ both your houses!They have made worms’ meat of me: I have it,And soundly too:—your houses! [Exeunt MERCUTIO and BENVOLIO.]Which emotion most motivates Mercutio to speak these words? his desire for revenge on both families
Read Romeo’s comment after killing Tybalt in Act III, scene i of Romeo and Juliet.Romeo: O! I am Fortune’s fool.Romeo’s statement foreshadows the fact that the lovers have no control over their destinies.
Read the excerpt from Act II, scene v of Romeo and Juliet.Friar Laurence: These violent delights have violent ends,And in their triumph die, like fire and powder,Which, as they kiss consume: the sweetest honeyIs loathsome in his own deliciousnessAnd in the taste confounds the appetite: 15Therefore love moderately; long love doth so;Too swift arrives as tardy as too slow.Friar Laurence is motivated to offer this warning because he wants to caution Romeo about the consequences of his actions

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