Julius Caesar Acts 4-5 Test Review

The planned military conflict in Act IV is between- Brutus and Cassius on one side and Antony and Octavius on the other
In his attitude toward Lepidus, Antony is characterized as- arrogant
Brutus is motivated mainly by thoughts of- honor
An issue that stands between Cassius and Brutus is- Cassius’s taking of bribes
In his treatment of Cassius, Brutus is characterized as- righteous but forgiving
What is the dramatic purpose of the poet who appears in Act 4 scene 3? He interrupts the conflict between Brutus and Cassius, helping them keep the peace.
What does Caesar’s ghost tell Brutus? “Thou shalt see me at Philippi”
What happens to Portia? She takes her own life, upset over Brutus’s absence.
Cassius and Brutus argue over where they should do battle with the triumvirate’s troops. How is this conflict resolved? Not wanting further disagreement, Cassius agrees to Brutus’s plan.
Why is Brutus so angry with Cassius about rumors that he is taking bribes? They killed Caesar for the sake of justice, and they now appear hypocritical.
All of the action in Act V takes place during the span of- a single day
Shakespeare’s use of minor characters to report on the battle’s progress helps to create- suspense
In Scene 1, lines 46-47, Cassius says to Octavius, “This tongue had not offended so today,/ If Cassius might have ruled.” Cassius means that they would not be having their present conversation if- Brutus had agreed with Cassius to murder Antony
What incorrect conclusion does Pindarus come to about what is happening on the battlefield? (Act 5, scene 3) He thinks that Titinius is captured.
The consequence of Pindarus’s misreading of the battlefield in Act 5 scene 3 is- the death of Cassius
What really happens on the battlefield? Brutus’s army overpowers Octavius’s army, but then they are defeated.
What do Brutus and Cassius believe will happen to them if they are taken alive? They will be paraded as prisoners through the streets of Rome.
At the end, why does Antony believe that Brutus was different from the other conspirators? Brutus alone acted for the general good of Rome.
What is ironic, or surprising, about Brutus’s suicide? In Scene 2, he claimed that suicide was cowardly and vile.
The arguments, battles, and deaths in the final act serve to- make clear the tragic irony in Brutus’s motives
At the beginning of Act IV, what are Antony, Octavius, and Lepidus discussing? Which Romans they will kill in order to secure their power.
Which of the following best summarizes Brutus’s argument in Act IV, scene iii? They killed Caesar to end corruption; now they do not have the right to be corrupt themselves.
What best describes Brutus’s biggest flaw? He is idealistic, but na├»ve.
Cassius’s words “Urge me no more, I shall forget myself” reveal his flaw of- rash anger
Based on Antony’s speech when he finds Brutus’s body, we can infer that- Antony held a certain respect for Brutus
When most of Brutus’s servants refuse to hold the sword so he can commit suicide, we can infer that the servants- love Brutus and do not want him to die
When Octavius offers to take into service all those who followed Brutus, we can infer that he- is interested in reconciliation between the two groups
We can infer that the stress of war has gotten to Cassius and Brutus when- the two men quarrel in the tent and Cassius threatens Brutus
What line best reflects Antony’s feelings toward Lepidus? “Do not talk of him but as a property.”
Before the battle of Philippi, Brutus tells Cassius, “There is a tide in the affairs of men / Which, taken at the flood, leads on to fortune; / Omitted, all the voyage of their life / Is bound in shallows and in miseries.” Brutus means that- success depends on seizing opportunity
The character who most closely fits the definition of a tragic hero is- Brutus, because he is noble but flawed and causes his own downfall
The climax of the play occurs when- Brutus dies
What happens in the resolution of the play? Brutus is given a respectful burial.
What is Cassius’s fatal mistake in Act 5, scene 3? He mistakenly believes Titinius has been captured and kills himself out of guilt.
What statement by Brutus on the death of Cassius is most reflective of his stoicism? “Friends, I owe moe tears / to this dead man than you will see me pay. / I shall find time Cassius; I shall find time.”
In Act V, scene iv, to what does Brutus attribute the suicides of Cassius and Titinius? the power of Casear’s ghost
What is a good argument against Cassius’s being described as a noble hero who is brought low through his own fault? He is greedy and dishonest rather than noble and heroic.
What phrase best expresses the theme of “The Tragedy of Julius Caesar”? Good consequences cannot result from an evil deed.
Why is “The Tragedy of Julius Caesar” considered a tragedy? A main character is involved in a struggle that ends in disaster.
What is the attitude of Antony and Octavius toward Brutus’s followers when they have been captured? They are merciful.
What is the significance of the ghost’s promise to see Brutus at Philippi? Philippi is where Brutus is to meet Antony’s troops, and the ghost’s promise to be there is probably a bad omen.
What does Caesar’s ghost symbolize? Brutus’s guilty conscience
What words describe the relationship among the triumvirate? manipulation and suspicion
What is the initial source of conflict between Cassius and Brutus in Act IV? Brutus believes that Cassius has taken bribes.
Why does Brutus and Cassius’s friendship change in Act IV? Brutus and Cassius argue and disagree with each other.
How are Brutus and Cassius characterized in Act IV, scene iii? ambitious, petty, quarrelsome
When Brutus receives confirmation of Portia’s death, he is not very emotional because- he practiced the philosophy of Stoicism
How do the temperaments of Brutus and Cassius differ? Brutus is stoical, while Cassius is emotional.
Identify who said the following quote:”Et tu, Brute?– Then fall Caesar.” Caesar
Identify who said the following quote:”This was the noblest Roman of them all… / His life was gentle, and the elements / So mixed in him that Nature might stand up and say to all the world, ‘This was a man!'” Antony
Identify who said the following quote:”Let’s kill him boldly, but not wrathfully; / Let’s carve him as a dish fit for the gods, / Not hew him as a carcass for hounds.” Brutus
Identify who said the following quote:”Caesar, now be still; / I killed not thee with half so good a will.” Brutus
Identify who said the following quote:”Men at some times are masters of their fates. / The fault, dear Brutus, is not in our stars, / but in ourselves, that we are underlings.” Cassius
Identify who said the following quote:”As Caesar loved me, I weep for him; as / he was fortunate, I rejoice at it; as he was / valiant, I honor him; but as he was / ambitious, I slew him.” Brutus
Identify who said the following quote:”The evil that men do lives after them, / the good is oft interred with their bones.” Antony
Identify who said the following quote:”Cowards die many times before their deaths; / the valiant never taste of death but once.” Caesar
Identify the figurative language used in the following quote:”Live a thousand years, I shall not find myself so apt to die…” hyperbole
Identify the figurative language used in the following quote:”But I am constant as the Northern Star…” simile
Identify the figurative language used in the following quote:”…and some that smile have in their hearts, I fear, millions of mischiefs.” hyperbole
Identify the figurative language used in the following quote:”O hateful Error, Melancholy’s child, why dost thou show to the apt thoughts of me the things that are not?” personification
Identify the figurative language used in the following quote:”You are not wood, you are not stones, but men…” metaphor
Identify the figurative language used in the following quote:”His life was gentle, and the elements so mixed in him that Nature might stand up and say to all the world, ‘This was a man!'” personification
Identify the figurative language used in the following quote:”There is no terror, Cassius, in your threats; for I am armed so strong in honesty that they pass by me as the idle wind, which I respect not.” simile
Identify the figurative language used in the following quote:”…for when noble Caesar saw him stab, Ingratitude, more strong than traitor’s arms, quite vanquished him.” personification
Identify the figurative language used in the following quote:”I had rather have such men my friends than enemies.” assonance
Identify the figurative language used in the following quote:”You wrong me every way; you wrong me, Brutus; I said an elder solder, not a better.” consonance
Identify the figurative language used in the following quote:”Art thou some god, some angel, or some devil, that mak’st my blood cold, and my hair to stare?” rhyme
Identify the figurative language used in the following quote:”But it sufficeth that the day will *end*, and then the endendit sufficeth that the day will *end*, and then the *end* is known.” repetition
Identify the figurative language used in the following quote:”There are no tricks in plain and simple faith; but hollow men, like horses hot at hand, make gallant show and promise of their mettle.” alliteration
Identify the figurative language used in the following quote:”A peevish schoolboy, worthless of such honor, joined with a masker and a reveler.” consonance
Identify the figurative language used in the following quote:”Even so *great* men greatgreato *great* men *great* losses should endure.” repetition
Identify the figurative language used in the following quote:”Come poor remains of friends, rest on this rock.” alliteration
Identify who said the following quote:”…I do fear the people choose Caesar for their King.” Brutus
Identify who said the following quote:”Beware the ides of March.” Soothsayer
Identify who said the following quote:”But when I tell him he hates flatterers, He says he does, being then most flattered.” Decius
Identify who said the following quote:”Cassius, Be not deceived. If I have veiled my look, I turn the trouble of my countenance Merely upon myself.” Brutus
Identify who said the following quote:”Cry Havoc! and let slip the dogs of war.” Antony
Identify who said the following quote:”Even for that our love old, I prithee Hold thou my sword-hilt whilst I run on it.” Brutus
Identify who said the following quote:”Friends, Romans, countrymen, lend me your ears! I come to bury Caesar, not to praise him.” Anthony
Identify who said the following quote:”He was my friend, faithful and just to me. But Brutus says he was ambitious; And Brutus is an honorable man.” Antony
Identify who said the following quote:”I am not gamesome. I do lack some spirit Of that quick spirit that is Antony. Let me not hinder, Cassius, your desires. I’ll leave you.” Brutus
Identify who said the following quote:”I know where I will wear this dagger then; Cassius from bondage will deliver Cassius.” Cassius
Identify who said the following quote:”I shall remember. When Caesar says ‘Do this,’ it is performed.” Antony
Identify who said the following quote:”Let me have men about me that are fat, Sleek-headed-men, and such as sleep o’nights; Yond Cassius has a lean and hungry look; he thinks too much; such men are dangerous.” Caesar
Identify who said the following quote:”Mischief, thou art afoot, Take thou what course thou wilt.” Antony
Identify who said the following quote:”Not that I loved Caesar less, but that I loved Rome more.” Brutus
Identify who said the following quote:”O judgment, thou art fled to brutish beasts, And men have lost their reason! Bear with me, My heart is in the coffin there with Caesar, And I must pause till it come back to me.” Antony
Identify who said the following quote:”Speak hands for me!” Casca
Identify who said the following quote:”Thou art the ruins of the noblest man, That ever lived in the tide of times. Woe to the hand that shed this costly blood!” Antony
Identify who said the following quote:”When beggars die, there are no comets seen; The heavens themselves blaze forth the death of princes.” Calpurnia
Identify who said the following quote:”And therefore think him as a serpent’s egg, Which, hatched, would as his kind grow mischievous, And kill him in the shell.” Brutus

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