Honors English Acts 4 – 5 Romeo and Juliet

Who said it?Hold, daughter: I do spy a kind of hope,Which craves as desperate an execution.As that is desperate which we would prevent.If, rather than to marry County Paris,Thou hast the strength of will to slay thyself,Then is it likely thou wilt undertakeA thing like death to chide away this shame,That copest with death himself to scape from it:And, if thou darest, I’ll give thee remedy. Friar Lawrence
Translate:Hold, daughter: I do spy a kind of hope,Which craves as desperate an execution.As that is desperate which we would prevent.If, rather than to marry County Paris,Thou hast the strength of will to slay thyself,Then is it likely thou wilt undertakeA thing like death to chide away this shame,That copest with death himself to scape from it:And, if thou darest, I’ll give thee remedy. Hold on, daughter, I see some hope. But we must act boldly because the situation is so desperate. If you’ve made up your mind to kill yourself instead of marrying Count Paris, then you’ll probably be willing to try something like death to solve this shameful problem. You can wrestle with death to escape from shame. And if you dare to do it, I’ll give you the solution.
What is the significance of these lines?Hold, daughter: I do spy a kind of hope,Which craves as desperate an execution.As that is desperate which we would prevent.If, rather than to marry County Paris,Thou hast the strength of will to slay thyself,Then is it likely thou wilt undertakeA thing like death to chide away this shame,That copest with death himself to scape from it:And, if thou darest, I’ll give thee remedy. This was when Friar L. got the idea to give Juliet the sleeping potion or else she would have killed herself because she did not want to marry Paris.
Who said it?O, bid me leap, rather than marry Paris, From off the battlements of yonder tower; Or walk in thievish ways; or bid me lurk Where serpents are; chain me with roaring bears; Or shut me nightly in a charnel-house, O’er-cover’d quite with dead men’s rattling bones, With reeky shanks and yellow chapless skulls; Or bid me go into a new-made grave And hide me with a dead man in his shroud; Things that, to hear them told, have made me tremble; And I will do it without fear or doubt, To live an unstain’d wife to my sweet love. Juliet
Translate:O, bid me leap, rather than marry Paris, From off the battlements of yonder tower; Or walk in thievish ways; or bid me lurk Where serpents are; chain me with roaring bears; Or shut me nightly in a charnel-house, O’er-cover’d quite with dead men’s rattling bones, With reeky shanks and yellow chapless skulls; Or bid me go into a new-made grave And hide me with a dead man in his shroud; Things that, to hear them told, have made me tremble; And I will do it without fear or doubt, To live an unstain’d wife to my sweet love. Oh, you can tell me to jump off the battle posts of any tower, or to walk down the crime-ridden streets of a slum. Or tell me to sit in a field full of poisonous snakes. Chain me up with wild bears. Hide me every night in a morgue full of dead bodies with wet, smelly flesh and skulls without jawbones. Or tell me to climb down into a freshly dug grave, and hide me with a dead man in his tomb. All those ideas make me tremble when I hear them named. But I will do them without fear or dread in order to be a pure wife to my sweet love.
What is significant about these lines?O, bid me leap, rather than marry Paris, From off the battlements of yonder tower; Or walk in thievish ways; or bid me lurk Where serpents are; chain me with roaring bears; Or shut me nightly in a charnel-house, O’er-cover’d quite with dead men’s rattling bones, With reeky shanks and yellow chapless skulls; Or bid me go into a new-made grave And hide me with a dead man in his shroud; Things that, to hear them told, have made me tremble; And I will do it without fear or doubt, To live an unstain’d wife to my sweet love. This is a little bit of foreshadowing because she does have to lie in a grave next to dead people when she is “asleep”. This is when Juliet says she doesn’t want to marry Paris no matter what! She wanted to stay true to Romeo, and continue being ONLY HIS WIFE.
Who said it?Hold, then; go home, be merry, give consentTo marry Paris: Wednesday is to-morrow:To-morrow night look that thou lie alone;Let not thy nurse lie with thee in thy chamber:Take thou this vial, being then in bed,And this distilled liquor drink thou off;When presently through all thy veins shall runA cold and drowsy humour, for no pulseShall keep his native progress, but surcease:No warmth, no breath, shall testify thou livest;The roses in thy lips and cheeks shall fadeTo paly ashes, thy eyes’ windows fall,Like death, when he shuts up the day of life;Each part, deprived of supple government,Shall, stiff and stark and cold, appear like death:And in this borrow’d likeness of shrunk deathThou shalt continue two and forty hours,And then awake as from a pleasant sleep.Now, when the bridegroom in the morning comesTo rouse thee from thy bed, there art thou dead:Then, as the manner of our country is,In thy best robes uncover’d on the bierThou shalt be borne to that same ancient vaultWhere all the kindred of the Capulets lie.In the mean time, against thou shalt awake,Shall Romeo by my letters know our drift,And hither shall he come: and he and IWill watch thy waking, and that very nightShall Romeo bear thee hence to Mantua.And this shall free thee from this present shame;If no inconstant toy, nor womanish fear,Abate thy valour in the acting it. Friar Lawrence
Translation:Hold, then; go home, be merry, give consentTo marry Paris: Wednesday is to-morrow:To-morrow night look that thou lie alone;Let not thy nurse lie with thee in thy chamber:Take thou this vial, being then in bed,And this distilled liquor drink thou off;When presently through all thy veins shall runA cold and drowsy humour, for no pulseShall keep his native progress, but surcease:No warmth, no breath, shall testify thou livest;The roses in thy lips and cheeks shall fadeTo paly ashes, thy eyes’ windows fall,Like death, when he shuts up the day of life;Each part, deprived of supple government,Shall, stiff and stark and cold, appear like death:And in this borrow’d likeness of shrunk deathThou shalt continue two and forty hours,And then awake as from a pleasant sleep.Now, when the bridegroom in the morning comesTo rouse thee from thy bed, there art thou dead:Then, as the manner of our country is,In thy best robes uncover’d on the bierThou shalt be borne to that same ancient vaultWhere all the kindred of the Capulets lie.In the mean time, against thou shalt awake,Shall Romeo by my letters know our drift,And hither shall he come: and he and IWill watch thy waking, and that very nightShall Romeo bear thee hence to Mantua.And this shall free thee from this present shame;If no inconstant toy, nor womanish fear,Abate thy valour in the acting it. Hold on, then. Go home, be cheerful, and tell them you agree to marry Paris. Tomorrow is Wednesday. Tomorrow night make sure that you are alone. Don’t let the Nurse stay with you in your bedroom. (showing her a vial) When you’re in bed, take this vial, mix its contents with liquor, and drink. Then a cold, sleep-inducing drug will run through your veins, and your pulse will stop. Your flesh will be cold, and you’ll stop breathing. The red in your lips and your cheeks will turn pale, and your eyes will shut. It will seem like you’re dead. You won’t be able to move, and your body will be stiff like a corpse. You’ll remain in this deathlike state for forty-two hours, and then you’ll wake up as if from a pleasant sleep. Now, when the bridegroom comes to get you out of bed on Thursday morning, you’ll seem dead. Then, as tradition demands, you’ll be dressed up in your best clothes, put in an open coffin, and carried to the Capulet family tomb. Meanwhile, I’ll send Romeo word of our plan. He’ll come here, and we’ll keep a watch for when you wake up. That night, Romeo will take you away to Mantua. This plan will free you from the shameful situation that troubles you now as long as you don’t change your mind, or become scared like a silly woman and ruin your brave effort.
What is the Signifance of these lines?Hold, then; go home, be merry, give consentTo marry Paris: Wednesday is to-morrow:To-morrow night look that thou lie alone;Let not thy nurse lie with thee in thy chamber:Take thou this vial, being then in bed,And this distilled liquor drink thou off;When presently through all thy veins shall runA cold and drowsy humour, for no pulseShall keep his native progress, but surcease:No warmth, no breath, shall testify thou livest;The roses in thy lips and cheeks shall fadeTo paly ashes, thy eyes’ windows fall,Like death, when he shuts up the day of life;Each part, deprived of supple government,Shall, stiff and stark and cold, appear like death:And in this borrow’d likeness of shrunk deathThou shalt continue two and forty hours,And then awake as from a pleasant sleep.Now, when the bridegroom in the morning comesTo rouse thee from thy bed, there art thou dead:Then, as the manner of our country is,In thy best robes uncover’d on the bierThou shalt be borne to that same ancient vaultWhere all the kindred of the Capulets lie.In the mean time, against thou shalt awake,Shall Romeo by my letters know our drift,And hither shall he come: and he and IWill watch thy waking, and that very nightShall Romeo bear thee hence to Mantua.And this shall free thee from this present shame;If no inconstant toy, nor womanish fear,Abate thy valour in the acting it. This was when Frier L. told Juliet his plan for her to take a “sleeping” drug to make her appear dead. This will allow the wedding to be canceled, because everyone would be mourining about Juliet’s death. But, when she would be in her tomb at night, Romeo will come and get her to take her to Mantua where they can be happily married together.
Who said it?Farewell! God knows when we shall meet again.I have a faint cold fear thrills through my veins,That almost freezes up the heat of life:I’ll call them back again to comfort me:Nurse! What should she do here?My dismal scene I needs must act alone.Come, vial.What if this mixture do not work at all?Shall I be married then to-morrow morning?No, no: this shall forbid it: lie thou there.Laying down her daggerWhat if it be a poison, which the friarSubtly hath minister’d to have me dead,Lest in this marriage he should be dishonour’d,Because he married me before to Romeo?I fear it is: and yet, methinks, it should not,For he hath still been tried a holy man.How if, when I am laid into the tomb,I wake before the time that RomeoCome to redeem me? there’s a fearful point!Shall I not, then, be stifled in the vault,To whose foul mouth no healthsome air breathes in,And there die strangled ere my Romeo comes?Or, if I live, is it not very like,The horrible conceit of death and night,Together with the terror of the place,–As in a vault, an ancient receptacle,Where, for these many hundred years, the bonesOf all my buried ancestors are packed:Where bloody Tybalt, yet but green in earth,Lies festering in his shroud; where, as they say,At some hours in the night spirits resort;–Alack, alack, is it not like that I,So early waking, what with loathsome smells,And shrieks like mandrakes’ torn out of the earth,That living mortals, hearing them, run mad:–O, if I wake, shall I not be distraught,Environed with all these hideous fears?And madly play with my forefather’s joints?And pluck the mangled Tybalt from his shroud?And, in this rage, with some great kinsman’s bone,As with a club, dash out my desperate brains?O, look! methinks I see my cousin’s ghostSeeking out Romeo, that did spit his bodyUpon a rapier’s point: stay, Tybalt, stay!Romeo, I come! this do I drink to thee. Juliet
Translation:Farewell! God knows when we shall meet again.I have a faint cold fear thrills through my veins,That almost freezes up the heat of life:I’ll call them back again to comfort me:Nurse! What should she do here?My dismal scene I needs must act alone.Come, vial.What if this mixture do not work at all?Shall I be married then to-morrow morning?No, no: this shall forbid it: lie thou there.Laying down her daggerWhat if it be a poison, which the friarSubtly hath minister’d to have me dead,Lest in this marriage he should be dishonour’d,Because he married me before to Romeo?I fear it is: and yet, methinks, it should not,For he hath still been tried a holy man.How if, when I am laid into the tomb,I wake before the time that RomeoCome to redeem me? there’s a fearful point!Shall I not, then, be stifled in the vault,To whose foul mouth no healthsome air breathes in,And there die strangled ere my Romeo comes?Or, if I live, is it not very like,The horrible conceit of death and night,Together with the terror of the place,–As in a vault, an ancient receptacle,Where, for these many hundred years, the bonesOf all my buried ancestors are packed:Where bloody Tybalt, yet but green in earth,Lies festering in his shroud; where, as they say,At some hours in the night spirits resort;–Alack, alack, is it not like that I,So early waking, what with loathsome smells,And shrieks like mandrakes’ torn out of the earth,That living mortals, hearing them, run mad:–O, if I wake, shall I not be distraught,Environed with all these hideous fears?And madly play with my forefather’s joints?And pluck the mangled Tybalt from his shroud?And, in this rage, with some great kinsman’s bone,As with a club, dash out my desperate brains?O, look! methinks I see my cousin’s ghostSeeking out Romeo, that did spit his bodyUpon a rapier’s point: stay, Tybalt, stay!Romeo, I come! this do I drink to thee. Good-bye. Only God knows when we’ll meet again. There is a slight cold fear cutting through my veins. It almost freezes the heat of life. I’ll call them back here to comfort me. Nurse!—Oh, what good would she do here? In my desperate situation, I have to act alone. Alright, here’s the vial. What if this mixture doesn’t work at all? Will I be married tomorrow morning? No, no, this knife will stop it. Lie down right there. (she lays down the knife) What if the Friar mixed the potion to kill me? Is he worried that he will be disgraced if I marry Paris after he married me to Romeo? I’m afraid that it’s poison. And yet, it shouldn’t be poison because he is a trustworthy holy man. What if, when I am put in the tomb, I wake up before Romeo comes to save me? That’s a frightening idea. Won’t I suffocate in the tomb? There’s no healthy air to breathe in there. Will I die of suffocation before Romeo comes? Or if I live, I’ll be surrounded by death and darkness. It will be terrible. There will be bones hundreds of years old in that tomb, my ancestors’ bones. Tybalt’s body will be in there, freshly entombed, and his corpse will be rotting. They say that during the night the spirits are in tombs. Oh no, oh no. I’ll wake up and smell awful odors. I’ll hear screams that would drive people crazy.
What is the significance of these lines?Farewell! God knows when we shall meet again.I have a faint cold fear thrills through my veins,That almost freezes up the heat of life:I’ll call them back again to comfort me:Nurse! What should she do here?My dismal scene I needs must act alone.Come, vial.What if this mixture do not work at all?Shall I be married then to-morrow morning?No, no: this shall forbid it: lie thou there.Laying down her daggerWhat if it be a poison, which the friarSubtly hath minister’d to have me dead,Lest in this marriage he should be dishonour’d,Because he married me before to Romeo?I fear it is: and yet, methinks, it should not,For he hath still been tried a holy man.How if, when I am laid into the tomb,I wake before the time that RomeoCome to redeem me? there’s a fearful point!Shall I not, then, be stifled in the vault,To whose foul mouth no healthsome air breathes in,And there die strangled ere my Romeo comes?Or, if I live, is it not very like,The horrible conceit of death and night,Together with the terror of the place,–As in a vault, an ancient receptacle,Where, for these many hundred years, the bonesOf all my buried ancestors are packed:Where bloody Tybalt, yet but green in earth,Lies festering in his shroud; where, as they say,At some hours in the night spirits resort;–Alack, alack, is it not like that I,So early waking, what with loathsome smells,And shrieks like mandrakes’ torn out of the earth,That living mortals, hearing them, run mad:–O, if I wake, shall I not be distraught,Environed with all these hideous fears?And madly play with my forefather’s joints?And pluck the mangled Tybalt from his shroud?And, in this rage, with some great kinsman’s bone,As with a club, dash out my desperate brains?O, look! methinks I see my cousin’s ghostSeeking out Romeo, that did spit his bodyUpon a rapier’s point: stay, Tybalt, stay!Romeo, I come! this do I drink to thee. Juliet is debating whether or not to take the drug. She has different thoughts. The first one is; What if it really is poison and Friar Lawrence only wants to kill Juliet and make it look by accident to clear his name. Her second one is; What if the drug does not work, and when she awakens the next mourning, she will have to get married to Paris. Her third one is; What if she wakes up and Romeo is not there? Or what if Romeo does not get there in time, or at all? Her last one is; She will have to be in a tomb next to dead rotting bodies, including rotten Tybalt. JUliet thinks of all of these things before she takes the drug, but she takes it anyways because she loves romeo, and she will do anything to be with him.
Who said it?If I may trust the flattering truth of sleep,My dreams presage some joyful news at hand:My bosom’s lord sits lightly in his throne;And all this day an unaccustom’d spiritLifts me above the ground with cheerful thoughts.I dreamt my lady came and found me dead–Strange dream, that gives a dead man leaveto think!–And breathed such life with kisses in my lips,That I revived, and was an emperor.Ah me! how sweet is love itself possess’d,When but love’s shadows are so rich in joy!Enter BALTHASAR, bootedNews from Verona!–How now, Balthasar!Dost thou not bring me letters from the friar?How doth my lady? Is my father well?How fares my Juliet? that I ask again;For nothing can be ill, if she be well. Romeo
Translation:If I may trust the flattering truth of sleep,My dreams presage some joyful news at hand:My bosom’s lord sits lightly in his throne;And all this day an unaccustom’d spiritLifts me above the ground with cheerful thoughts.I dreamt my lady came and found me dead–Strange dream, that gives a dead man leaveto think!–And breathed such life with kisses in my lips,That I revived, and was an emperor.Ah me! how sweet is love itself possess’d,When but love’s shadows are so rich in joy!Enter BALTHASAR, bootedNews from Verona!–How now, Balthasar!Dost thou not bring me letters from the friar?How doth my lady? Is my father well?How fares my Juliet? that I ask again;For nothing can be ill, if she be well. If I can trust my dreams, then some joyful news is coming soon. Love rules my heart, and all day long a strange feeling has been making me cheerful. I had a dream that my lady came and found me dead. It’s a strange dream that lets a dead man think! She came and brought me back to life by kissing my lips. I rose from the dead and was an emperor. Oh my! How sweet it would be to actually have the woman I love, when merely thinking about love makes me so happy.
What is the significance of these lines?If I may trust the flattering truth of sleep,My dreams presage some joyful news at hand:My bosom’s lord sits lightly in his throne;And all this day an unaccustom’d spiritLifts me above the ground with cheerful thoughts.I dreamt my lady came and found me dead–Strange dream, that gives a dead man leaveto think!–And breathed such life with kisses in my lips,That I revived, and was an emperor.Ah me! how sweet is love itself possess’d,When but love’s shadows are so rich in joy!Enter BALTHASAR, bootedNews from Verona!–How now, Balthasar!Dost thou not bring me letters from the friar?How doth my lady? Is my father well?How fares my Juliet? that I ask again;For nothing can be ill, if she be well. This is foreshadowing into when Juliet tries to kiss Romeo to get the poison on his lips. But, she did not bring Romeo back from the dead, nothing happened. Romeo says this right before his servant tells him that Juliet is “dead”, which makes Romeo buy the poison.
Who said it?Then she is well, and nothing can be ill:Her body sleeps in Capel’s monument,And her immortal part with angels lives.I saw her laid low in her kindred’s vault,And presently took post to tell it you:O, pardon me for bringing these ill news,Since you did leave it for my office, sir. Balthasar
Translation:Then she is well, and nothing can be ill:Her body sleeps in Capel’s monument,And her immortal part with angels lives.I saw her laid low in her kindred’s vault,And presently took post to tell it you:O, pardon me for bringing these ill news,Since you did leave it for my office, sir. Then she is well, and nothing is wrong. Her body sleeps in the Capulet tomb, and her immortal soul lives with the angels in heaven. I saw her buried in her family’s tomb, and then I came here to tell you the news. Oh, pardon me for bringing this bad news, but you told me it was my job, sir.
What is the significance of these lines?Then she is well, and nothing can be ill:Her body sleeps in Capel’s monument,And her immortal part with angels lives.I saw her laid low in her kindred’s vault,And presently took post to tell it you:O, pardon me for bringing these ill news,Since you did leave it for my office, sir. Juliet is dead, this makes Romeo buy poison.
Who said it?Is it even so? then I defy you, stars!Thou know’st my lodging: get me ink and paper,And hire post-horses; I will hence to-night. Romeo
Translation:Is it even so? then I defy you, stars!Thou know’st my lodging: get me ink and paper,And hire post-horses; I will hence to-night. Is it really true? Then I rebel against you, stars! You know where I live. Get me some ink and paper, and hire some horses to ride. I will leave here for Verona tonight.
What is the significance of these lines?Is it even so? then I defy you, stars!Thou know’st my lodging: get me ink and paper,And hire post-horses; I will hence to-night. Romeo is referencing the stars. Connects to star – crossed – lovers.
Who said it?I do beseech you, sir, have patience:Your looks are pale and wild, and do importSome misadventure. Balthasar
Translation: I do beseech you, sir, have patience:Your looks are pale and wild, and do importSome misadventure. Please, sir, have patience. You look pale and wild as if you’re going to hurt yourself.
What is the significance of these lines? I do beseech you, sir, have patience:Your looks are pale and wild, and do importSome misadventure. Romeo is going to see Juliet. But, his servant thinks that Romeo is planning something bad becuase he has a weird look in his eyes.
Who said it?Come hither, man. I see that thou art poor:Hold, there is forty ducats: let me haveA dram of poison, such soon-speeding gearAs will disperse itself through all the veinsThat the life-weary taker may fall deadAnd that the trunk may be discharged of breathAs violently as hasty powder firedDoth hurry from the fatal cannon’s womb. Romeo
Translation:Come hither, man. I see that thou art poor:Hold, there is forty ducats: let me haveA dram of poison, such soon-speeding gearAs will disperse itself through all the veinsThat the life-weary taker may fall deadAnd that the trunk may be discharged of breathAs violently as hasty powder firedDoth hurry from the fatal cannon’s womb. Come here, man. I see that you are poor. Here is a lot of money. Let me have a shot of poison, something that works so fast that the person who takes it will die as fast as gunpowder exploding in a canon.
What is the significance in these lines? Come hither, man. I see that thou art poor:Hold, there is forty ducats: let me haveA dram of poison, such soon-speeding gearAs will disperse itself through all the veinsThat the life-weary taker may fall deadAnd that the trunk may be discharged of breathAs violently as hasty powder firedDoth hurry from the fatal cannon’s womb. Romeo wants poison, so if Juliet really is dead, he can take it and he will die instantly. So he can see Juliet again.
Who said it?Such mortal drugs I have; but Mantua’s lawIs death to any he that utters them. Apothecary
Translation:Such mortal drugs I have; but Mantua’s lawIs death to any he that utters them. I have the poison, but it is illegal to sell this position here. I cannot give it to you.
What is the significance of these lines?Such mortal drugs I have; but Mantua’s lawIs death to any he that utters them. Romeo should not get the drugs because the apothecary does not want to sell it to him because it is illegal.
Who said it? Art thou so bare and full of wretchedness,And fear’st to die? famine is in thy cheeks,Need and oppression starveth in thine eyes,Contempt and beggary hangs upon thy back;The world is not thy friend nor the world’s law;The world affords no law to make thee rich;Then be not poor, but break it, and take this. Romeo
Translation:Art thou so bare and full of wretchedness,And fear’st to die? famine is in thy cheeks,Need and oppression starveth in thine eyes,Contempt and beggary hangs upon thy back;The world is not thy friend nor the world’s law;The world affords no law to make thee rich;Then be not poor, but break it, and take this. You’re this poor and wretched and still afraid to die? Your cheeks are thin because of hunger. I can see in your eyes that you’re starving. Anyone can see that you’re a beggar. The world is not your friend, and neither is the law. The world doesn’t make laws to make you rich. So don’t be poor. Break the law, and take this money. (he holds out money)
What is the significance of these lines:Art thou so bare and full of wretchedness,And fear’st to die? famine is in thy cheeks,Need and oppression starveth in thine eyes,Contempt and beggary hangs upon thy back;The world is not thy friend nor the world’s law;The world affords no law to make thee rich;Then be not poor, but break it, and take this. Romeo uses the fact that the apothecary is poor against him so he can get the poison.
Who said it?My poverty, but not my will, consents. Apothecary
Translation:My poverty, but not my will, consents. I agree because I’m poor, not because I want to.
What is the significance of these lines?My poverty, but not my will, consents. The apothecary is saying that he does not want to give the poison to Romeo, but he is poor and desperate so he will take the money.
Who said it?I pay thy poverty, and not thy will. Romeo
Translation:I pay thy poverty, and not thy will. I pay you because you’re poor, not because you want me to buy this.
What is the significance about these lines?I pay thy poverty, and not thy will. Romeo is saying that nothing illegal is happening it is just a man trying to get more money, even though Romeo should not have the poison.
Who said it?Put this in any liquid thing you will,And drink it off; and, if you had the strengthOf twenty men, it would dispatch you straight. Apothecary
Translation:Put this in any liquid thing you will,And drink it off; and, if you had the strengthOf twenty men, it would dispatch you straight. Put this in any kind of liquid you want and drink it down. Even if you were as strong as twenty men, it would kill you immediately.
What is the signifance of these lines?Put this in any liquid thing you will,And drink it off; and, if you had the strengthOf twenty men, it would dispatch you straight. Romeo is going to die, and no one could survive this poison. Romeo gets the poison.
Who said it?There is thy gold, worse poison to men’s souls,Doing more murders in this loathsome world,Than these poor compounds that thou mayst not sell.I sell thee poison; thou hast sold me none.Farewell: buy food, and get thyself in flesh.Come, cordial and not poison, go with meTo Juliet’s grave; for there must I use thee. Romeo
Translation:There is thy gold, worse poison to men’s souls,Doing more murders in this loathsome world,Than these poor compounds that thou mayst not sell.I sell thee poison; thou hast sold me none.Farewell: buy food, and get thyself in flesh.Come, cordial and not poison, go with meTo Juliet’s grave; for there must I use thee. There is your gold. Money is a worse poison to men’s souls, and commits more murders in this awful world, than these poor poisons that you’re not allowed to sell. I’ve sold you poison. You haven’t sold me any. Goodbye. Buy yourself food, and put some flesh on your bones. I’ll take this mixture, which is a medicine, not a poison, to Juliet’s grave. That’s where I must use it.
What is the significance of these lines?There is thy gold, worse poison to men’s souls,Doing more murders in this loathsome world,Than these poor compounds that thou mayst not sell.I sell thee poison; thou hast sold me none.Farewell: buy food, and get thyself in flesh.Come, cordial and not poison, go with meTo Juliet’s grave; for there must I use thee. Romeo is saying that money is the poison, it murders people trying to get it. Romeo then is going to take the poison to Juliet’s grave to use there in case she really is dead.
Who said it?O my love! my wife!Death, that hath suck’d the honey of thy breath,Hath had no power yet upon thy beauty:Thou art not conquer’d; beauty’s ensign yetIs crimson in thy lips and in thy cheeks,And death’s pale flag is not advanced there.Tybalt, liest thou there in thy bloody sheet?O, what more favour can I do to thee,Than with that hand that cut thy youth in twainTo sunder his that was thine enemy?Forgive me, cousin! Ah, dear Juliet,Why art thou yet so fair? shall I believeThat unsubstantial death is amorous,And that the lean abhorred monster keepsThee here in dark to be his paramour?For fear of that, I still will stay with thee;And never from this palace of dim nightDepart again: here, here will I remainWith worms that are thy chamber-maids; O, hereWill I set up my everlasting rest,And shake the yoke of inauspicious starsFrom this world-wearied flesh. Eyes, look your last!Arms, take your last embrace! and, lips, O youThe doors of breath, seal with a righteous kissA dateless bargain to engrossing death!Come, bitter conduct, come, unsavoury guide!Thou desperate pilot, now at once run onThe dashing rocks thy sea-sick weary bark!Here’s to my love! Romeo
Translation:O my love! my wife!Death, that hath suck’d the honey of thy breath,Hath had no power yet upon thy beauty:Thou art not conquer’d; beauty’s ensign yetIs crimson in thy lips and in thy cheeks,And death’s pale flag is not advanced there.Tybalt, liest thou there in thy bloody sheet?O, what more favour can I do to thee,Than with that hand that cut thy youth in twainTo sunder his that was thine enemy?Forgive me, cousin! Ah, dear Juliet,Why art thou yet so fair? shall I believeThat unsubstantial death is amorous,And that the lean abhorred monster keepsThee here in dark to be his paramour?For fear of that, I still will stay with thee;And never from this palace of dim nightDepart again: here, here will I remainWith worms that are thy chamber-maids; O, hereWill I set up my everlasting rest,And shake the yoke of inauspicious starsFrom this world-wearied flesh. Eyes, look your last!Arms, take your last embrace! and, lips, O youThe doors of breath, seal with a righteous kissA dateless bargain to engrossing death!Come, bitter conduct, come, unsavoury guide!Thou desperate pilot, now at once run onThe dashing rocks thy sea-sick weary bark!Here’s to my love! Oh, my love! My wife! Death has sucked the honey from your breath, but it has not yet ruined your beauty. You haven’t been conquered. There is still red in your lips and in your cheeks. Death has not yet turned them pale. Tybalt, are you lying there in your bloody death shroud? Oh, what better favor can I do for you than to kill the man who killed you with the same hand that made you die young. Forgive me, cousin! Ah, dear Juliet, why are you still so beautiful? Should I believe that death is in love with you, and that the awful monster keeps you here to be his mistress? I don’t like that idea, so I’ll stay with you. And I will never leave this tomb. Here, here I’ll remain with worms that are your chamber-maids. Oh, I’ll rest here forever. I’ll forget about all the bad luck that has troubled me. Eyes, look out for the last time! Arms, make your last embrace! And lips, you are the doors of breath. Seal with a righteous kiss the deal I have made with death forever. (ROMEO kisses JULIET and takes out the poison) Come, bitter poison, come, unsavory guide! You desperate pilot, let’s crash this sea-weary ship into the rocks! Here’s to my love!
What is the significance of these lines? O my love! my wife!Death, that hath suck’d the honey of thy breath,Hath had no power yet upon thy beauty:Thou art not conquer’d; beauty’s ensign yetIs crimson in thy lips and in thy cheeks,And death’s pale flag is not advanced there.Tybalt, liest thou there in thy bloody sheet?O, what more favour can I do to thee,Than with that hand that cut thy youth in twainTo sunder his that was thine enemy?Forgive me, cousin! Ah, dear Juliet,Why art thou yet so fair? shall I believeThat unsubstantial death is amorous,And that the lean abhorred monster keepsThee here in dark to be his paramour?For fear of that, I still will stay with thee;And never from this palace of dim nightDepart again: here, here will I remainWith worms that are thy chamber-maids; O, hereWill I set up my everlasting rest,And shake the yoke of inauspicious starsFrom this world-wearied flesh. Eyes, look your last!Arms, take your last embrace! and, lips, O youThe doors of breath, seal with a righteous kissA dateless bargain to engrossing death!Come, bitter conduct, come, unsavoury guide!Thou desperate pilot, now at once run onThe dashing rocks thy sea-sick weary bark!Here’s to my love! At the end Romeo is speaking in metaphor, ” Come, bitter poison, come, unsavory guide! You desperate pilot, let’s crash this sea-weary ship into the rocks!” This is his final words as a character alive in this tragedy. He is about to take the potion because he wants to be next to Juliet because he doesn’t want her to be all alone, and afraid. He also does not want death to fall in love with her. He also says that she does not look dead this is dramatic irony because she is about to wake up, if only Romeo could have waited a few more seconds.
Who said it?I will be brief, for my short date of breathIs not so long as is a tedious tale.Romeo, there dead, was husband to that Juliet;And she, there dead, that Romeo’s faithful wife:I married them; and their stol’n marriage-dayWas Tybalt’s dooms-day, whose untimely deathBanish’d the new-made bridegroom from the city,For whom, and not for Tybalt, Juliet pined.You, to remove that siege of grief from her,Betroth’d and would have married her perforceTo County Paris: then comes she to me,And, with wild looks, bid me devise some meanTo rid her from this second marriage,Or in my cell there would she kill herself.Then gave I her, so tutor’d by my art,A sleeping potion; which so took effectAs I intended, for it wrought on herThe form of death: meantime I writ to Romeo,That he should hither come as this dire night,To help to take her from her borrow’d grave,Being the time the potion’s force should cease.But he which bore my letter, Friar John,Was stay’d by accident, and yesternightReturn’d my letter back. Then all aloneAt the prefixed hour of her waking,Came I to take her from her kindred’s vault;Meaning to keep her closely at my cell,Till I conveniently could send to Romeo:But when I came, some minute ere the timeOf her awaking, here untimely layThe noble Paris and true Romeo dead.She wakes; and I entreated her come forth,And bear this work of heaven with patience:But then a noise did scare me from the tomb;And she, too desperate, would not go with me,But, as it seems, did violence on herself.All this I know; and to the marriageHer nurse is privy: and, if aught in thisMiscarried by my fault, let my old lifeBe sacrificed, some hour before his time,Unto the rigour of severest law. Friar Lawrence
Translation:I will be brief, for my short date of breathIs not so long as is a tedious tale.Romeo, there dead, was husband to that Juliet;And she, there dead, that Romeo’s faithful wife:I married them; and their stol’n marriage-dayWas Tybalt’s dooms-day, whose untimely deathBanish’d the new-made bridegroom from the city,For whom, and not for Tybalt, Juliet pined.You, to remove that siege of grief from her,Betroth’d and would have married her perforceTo County Paris: then comes she to me,And, with wild looks, bid me devise some meanTo rid her from this second marriage,Or in my cell there would she kill herself.Then gave I her, so tutor’d by my art,A sleeping potion; which so took effectAs I intended, for it wrought on herThe form of death: meantime I writ to Romeo,That he should hither come as this dire night,To help to take her from her borrow’d grave,Being the time the potion’s force should cease.But he which bore my letter, Friar John,Was stay’d by accident, and yesternightReturn’d my letter back. Then all aloneAt the prefixed hour of her waking,Came I to take her from her kindred’s vault;Meaning to keep her closely at my cell,Till I conveniently could send to Romeo:But when I came, some minute ere the timeOf her awaking, here untimely layThe noble Paris and true Romeo dead.She wakes; and I entreated her come forth,And bear this work of heaven with patience:But then a noise did scare me from the tomb;And she, too desperate, would not go with me,But, as it seems, did violence on herself.All this I know; and to the marriageHer nurse is privy: and, if aught in thisMiscarried by my fault, let my old lifeBe sacrificed, some hour before his time,Unto the rigour of severest law. I will be brief because I’m not going to live long enough to tell a boring story. Romeo, who lies there dead, was the husband of that Juliet. And she, who lies there dead, was that Romeo’s faithful wife. I married them; their secret wedding day was the day Tybalt died. His untimely death caused the bridegroom to be banished from the city. Juliet was sad because Romeo was gone, not because of Tybalt’s death. To cure her sadness, you arranged a marriage for her with Count Paris. Then she came to me, and, looking wild, she asked me to devise a plan to get her out of this second marriage. She threatened to kill herself in my cell if I didn’t help her. So I gave her a sleeping potion that I had mixed with my special skills. It worked as planned. She seemed to everyone to be dead. In the meantime I wrote to Romeo and told him to come here on this awful night to help remove her from her temporary grave when the sleeping potion wore off. But the man who carried my letter, Friar John, was held up by an accident. Last night he gave me the letter back. So I came here alone at the hour when she was supposed to wake up. I came to take her out of her family’s tomb, hoping to hide her in my cell until I could make contact with Romeo. But by the time I got here, just a few minutes before Juliet woke up, Paris and Romeo were already dead. She woke up, and I asked her to come out of the tomb with me and endure this tragedy with patience. But then a noise sent me running scared from the tomb. She was too desperate to come with me, and it seems that she killed herself. I know all of this. And her Nurse knows about the marriage too. If any part of this tragedy is my fault, let my old life be sacrificed and let me suffer the most severe punishment.
What is the significance in these lines?I will be brief, for my short date of breathIs not so long as is a tedious tale.Romeo, there dead, was husband to that Juliet;And she, there dead, that Romeo’s faithful wife:I married them; and their stol’n marriage-dayWas Tybalt’s dooms-day, whose untimely deathBanish’d the new-made bridegroom from the city,For whom, and not for Tybalt, Juliet pined.You, to remove that siege of grief from her,Betroth’d and would have married her perforceTo County Paris: then comes she to me,And, with wild looks, bid me devise some meanTo rid her from this second marriage,Or in my cell there would she kill herself.Then gave I her, so tutor’d by my art,A sleeping potion; which so took effectAs I intended, for it wrought on herThe form of death: meantime I writ to Romeo,That he should hither come as this dire night,To help to take her from her borrow’d grave,Being the time the potion’s force should cease.But he which bore my letter, Friar John,Was stay’d by accident, and yesternightReturn’d my letter back. Then all aloneAt the prefixed hour of her waking,Came I to take her from her kindred’s vault;Meaning to keep her closely at my cell,Till I conveniently could send to Romeo:But when I came, some minute ere the timeOf her awaking, here untimely layThe noble Paris and true Romeo dead.She wakes; and I entreated her come forth,And bear this work of heaven with patience:But then a noise did scare me from the tomb;And she, too desperate, would not go with me,But, as it seems, did violence on herself.All this I know; and to the marriageHer nurse is privy: and, if aught in thisMiscarried by my fault, let my old lifeBe sacrificed, some hour before his time,Unto the rigour of severest law. Firer L. confesses that he is to blame with everything and explains to the families what happened how their rivalry caused their two children to kill each other. This is an important part in the tragedy because it is the part where the families realize that their rivalry caused their children’s death. Also, because Frier L. confesses to everything that he has done.
Who said it?This letter doth make good the friar’s words,Their course of love, the tidings of her death:And here he writes that he did buy a poisonOf a poor ‘pothecary, and therewithalCame to this vault to die, and lie with Juliet.Where be these enemies? Capulet! Montague!See, what a scourge is laid upon your hate,That heaven finds means to kill your joys with love.And I for winking at your discords tooHave lost a brace of kinsmen: all are punish’d. Prince Escules
Translation:This letter doth make good the friar’s words,Their course of love, the tidings of her death:And here he writes that he did buy a poisonOf a poor ‘pothecary, and therewithalCame to this vault to die, and lie with Juliet.Where be these enemies? Capulet! Montague!See, what a scourge is laid upon your hate,That heaven finds means to kill your joys with love.And I for winking at your discords tooHave lost a brace of kinsmen: all are punish’d. This letter confirms the friar’s account. It describes the course of their love and mentions the news of her death. Here he writes that he bought poison from a poor pharmacist. He brought that poison with him to this vault to die and lie with Juliet. Where are these enemies? Capulet! Montague! Do you see what a great evil results from your hate? Heaven has figured out how to kill your joys with love. Because I looked the other way when your feud flared up, I’ve lost several members of my family as well. Everyone is punished.
What is the significance of these lines?This letter doth make good the friar’s words,Their course of love, the tidings of her death:And here he writes that he did buy a poisonOf a poor ‘pothecary, and therewithalCame to this vault to die, and lie with Juliet.Where be these enemies? Capulet! Montague!See, what a scourge is laid upon your hate,That heaven finds means to kill your joys with love.And I for winking at your discords tooHave lost a brace of kinsmen: all are punish’d. Everyone is punished from the families rivalry. Important line: Heaven has figured out how to kill your joys with love.
Who said it?O brother Montague, give me thy hand:This is my daughter’s jointure, for no moreCan I demand. Lord Capulet
Translation:O brother Montague, give me thy hand:This is my daughter’s jointure, for no moreCan I demand. Oh, brother Montague, give me your hand. This is my daughter’s dowry. I can ask you for nothing more.
What is the significance of these lines?O brother Montague, give me thy hand:This is my daughter’s jointure, for no moreCan I demand. Lord Capulet is trying to end the riverly and make amends with the Montagues because of their children’s death.
Who said it?But I can give thee more:For I will raise her statue in pure gold;That while Verona by that name is known,There shall no figure at such rate be setAs that of true and faithful Juliet. Lord Montague
Translation:But I can give thee more:For I will raise her statue in pure gold;That while Verona by that name is known,There shall no figure at such rate be setAs that of true and faithful Juliet. But I can give you more. I’ll raise her statue in pure gold. As long as this city is called Verona, there will be no figure praised more than that of true and faithful Juliet.
What is the significance of these lines?But I can give thee more:For I will raise her statue in pure gold;That while Verona by that name is known,There shall no figure at such rate be setAs that of true and faithful Juliet. This is very symbolic because separate statues are making pure gold statues of the other child to never forget Romeo and Juliet’s love story.
Who said it?As rich shall Romeo’s by his lady’s lie;Poor sacrifices of our enmity! Lord Capulet
Translation:As rich shall Romeo’s by his lady’s lie;Poor sacrifices of our enmity! The statue I will make of Romeo to lie beside his Juliet will be just as rich. They were poor sacrifices of our rivalry!
What is the significance of these lines?As rich shall Romeo’s by his lady’s lie;Poor sacrifices of our enmity! The Capulets will make a statue of Romeo, to always remember not to fight and remind him of his daughter’s passing. The statues are very symbolic It represents the end of the Montague’s fighting.
Who said it?A glooming peace this morning with it brings;The sun, for sorrow, will not show his head:Go hence, to have more talk of these sad things;Some shall be pardon’d, and some punished:For never was a story of more woeThan this of Juliet and her Romeo. Prince Escules
Translation:A glooming peace this morning with it brings;The sun, for sorrow, will not show his head:Go hence, to have more talk of these sad things;Some shall be pardon’d, and some punished:For never was a story of more woeThan this of Juliet and her Romeo. We settle a dark peace this morning. The sun is too sad to show itself. Let’s go, to talk about these sad things some more. Some will be pardoned, and some will be punished. There was never a story more full of pain than the story of Romeo and Juliet.
What is the significance of these lines?A glooming peace this morning with it brings;The sun, for sorrow, will not show his head:Go hence, to have more talk of these sad things;Some shall be pardon’d, and some punished:For never was a story of more woeThan this of Juliet and her Romeo. The two families will mourn about it together and tell it to generations to come. Everyone will remember the true story of Romeo and Juliet.

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