Hamlet Unit Test

dates of Shakespeare’s birth and death April 23, 1564 – April 23, 1616
town & country where Shakespeare was born and buried Stratford-on-Avon, United Kingdom
identify the speaker & to whom or what he/she speaks. paraphrase the quotation. explain the quotation’s significance to the focus/theme/experience of the play.”Neither a borrower nor lender be,For loan oft loses both itself and friend,And borrowing dulleth th’ edge of husbandry.” p31 lines 75-77 Polonius to Laertes. don’t borrow or lend b/c loaning loses friends & borrowing makes you cheap
Shakespeare’s actual burial place Holy Trinity Church
epitaph on Shakespeare’s tombstone good friend for Jesus sake forbeare,to digg the dust encloased heareblest be the man that spares thes stones,and curst be he that moves my bones.
number of plays written/acted/published 37
First Folio a folio is a book made by folding a piece of paper in half (quarto is folded twice). published in 1623. contains 36 plays.
number of sonnets written 154
names of theaters the Globe Theatre; Blackfriars Theatre
names of acting company and sponsors Lord Chamberlain’s Men; Queen ElizabethThe King’s Men; King James I
setting of Hamlet (century, country, time span) mid-1000s, Middle Ages; Denmark; 2-3 months
definitions/examples/significance of examples to the play and a theme of the play: foil (2 foil characters to Hamlet) character whose traits contrast with and therefore highlight the traits of another character. Laertes & Fortinbras. both take action, whereas Hamlet does not
definitions/examples/significance of examples to the play and a theme of the play: blank verse unrhymed poetry written in iambic pentameter
definitions/examples/significance of examples to the play and a theme of the play: couplet 2 rhymed lines
definitions/examples/significance of examples to the play and a theme of the play: prose compresses meaning into few words. meter, rhyme, & imagery
definitions/examples/significance of examples to the play and a theme of the play: soliloquy a speech delivered by a lone character (or one who thinks he is alone) that reveals his/her thoughts or feelingshamlet has several soliloquies. “to be or not to be” “o what a rogue and peasant slave am I”
definitions/examples/significance of examples to the play and a theme of the play: aside a statement made by a character in a play, intended to be heard by the audience (or one specific character) but not by other characterspolonius says an aside during a conversation with hamlet about how he believes hamlet is mad about his daughter (“still on my daughter” p81)
definitions/examples/significance of examples to the play and a theme of the play: irony (dramatic/situational) dramatic: something is known by the reader or audience but not by the characterswhen Hamlet kills Polonius behind the curtain. he thinks it’s a rat or possibly Claudius but then discovers he killed poloniussituational: an event occurs that violates the expectations of the characters, reader, or audiencethe end of the story pretty much lol
definitions/examples/significance of examples to the play and a theme of the play: comic relief a technique used to relieve the seriousness or emotional intensity of a literary work by introducing a humorous character or situationthe gravediggers’ scene
definitions/examples/significance of examples to the play and a theme of the play: psychological drama deals with the state of mind of its central character. deal with madness or other extreme psychological states
definitions/examples/significance of examples to the play and a theme of the play: pun a joke exploiting the different possible meanings of a word or the fact that there are words that sound alike but have different meanings.”too much in the sun”
parts of a Freytag pyramid exposition, inciting incident, rising action, climax, falling action, resolution, denouement
name/define the parts/elements of the freytag pyramid; be able to explain the incident(s) that comprise each part/element: exposition the part of a plot that provides background information about the characters, setting, or conflictact I. setting & guard platform introduced. there is a ghost. Horatio decides to tell hamlet about the ghost
name/define the parts/elements of the pyramid; be able to explain the incident(s) that comprise each part/element: inciting incident the event that introduces the central conflictact I. the ghost reveals that it is hamlet’s dead father, and that he was murdered by the current king, claudius
name/define the parts/elements of the pyramid; be able to explain the incident(s) that comprise each part/element: rising action develops the conflict to a high point of intensityact II. everything that happens up until hamlet kills polonius
name/define the parts/elements of the pyramid; be able to explain the incident(s) that comprise each part/element: climax the high point of interest or suspense in the plot.either hamlet finding out for certain that Claudius is guilty or killing polonius. not sure
name/define the parts/elements of the pyramid; be able to explain the incident(s) that comprise each part/element: falling action all the events that follow the climax
name/define the parts/elements of the pyramid; be able to explain the incident(s) that comprise each part/element: resolution the point at which the central conflict is ended, or resolvedhamlet kills Claudius. all is right with the world. except for how he, Laertes, rozencrantz, Guildenstern, and the queen are all dead. oops.
name/define the parts/elements of the pyramid; be able to explain the incident(s) that comprise each part/element: denouement any material that follows the resolution and that ties up loose endshoratio threatens to kill himself. hamlet is like omg no bro u have to tell my story. so hes like ok and hamlet tells horatio that he wants fortinbras to be king
explain the various literary forms of the English language that Shakespeare uses to reflect different types of characters and/or situations in his plays blank verse: nobility when speaking to other nobility or educated peoplerhymed couplets: an evil character. or one who is plotting evil. or to tie up the end of an act or sceneprose???: uneducated rabble
explain the Elizabethans belief in the ancient greek medical theory, the theory of humors, and how it relates to an understanding of Prince Hamlet described human personality as being determined by the combination of four humors, or fluids produced by the body. they were blood, phlegm, yellow bile, and black bileexcess of blood created a sanguine (lusty & cheerful) personalityexcess of phlegm created a phlegmatic (sluggish, dull) personalityexcess of yellow bile (choler) created a choleric (angry, irritable) personalityexcess of black bile created a melancholic (depressive) personality (p92)
briefly explain the views of acting/playwriting that hamlet/Shakespeare espouse be natural when u act. like holding a mirror up to nature
identify the speaker & to whom or what he/she speaks. paraphrase the quotation. explain the quotation’s significance to the focus/theme/experience of the play.”Frailty, thy name is woman!” p19 Hamlet about the Queen. women are frail in mindset. he is angry with his mother for marrying so quickly after his father’s death
identify the speaker & to whom or what he/she speaks. paraphrase the quotation. explain the quotation’s significance to the focus/theme/experience of the play.”Himself the primrose path of dalliance treads,And reaks not his own rede.” p29 Ophelia to Laertes. don’t be hypocritical
identify the speaker & to whom or what he/she speaks. paraphrase the quotation. explain the quotation’s significance to the focus/theme/experience of the play.”Something is rotten in the state of Denmark.” p45h Marcellus to Horatio. they’re suspicious about what’s going on because they wouldn’t have seen a ghost if nothing evil was happening.
identify the speaker & to whom or what he/she speaks. paraphrase the quotation. explain the quotation’s significance to the focus/theme/experience of the play.”That one may smile, and smile, and be a villain!” Hamlet about Claudius. Claudius smiles and acts nice but is evil
bruh I’m tired of typing these quotes
There are more things in heaven and earth, HoratioThan are dreamt of in your philosophy Hamlet to Horatio. there are more things to existence than what you can conjure in your mind
The time is out of joint Hamlet to Horatio and Marcellus. everything is disturbed & wrong and i, hamlet, will be the one to set it right
ok u know what yall just gonna have to look at these quotes your own selves bc i don’t feel like doing this anymore I’m tired
in act v, scene ii, hamlet asserts that providence governs all things: “there’s a divinity that shapes our ends, rough-hew them how we will,” and horatio answers, “that is most certain,” Hamlet then claims, “the readiness is all.” However, some actual events in the play show that events occur accidentally, bringing doom to both the innocent and the guilty. are these events also part of a plan governed by providence? reflect and come to some conclusion on this matter in view of hamlet’s thought versus action and his resolution that “the readiness is all” ok well Laertes and Gertrude die which seems to be a bit of an accident. they weren’t really innocent though. idk
explain the difference between the classical greek tragic hero, the prototype of tragic heroes, and the renaissance/Shakespearean tragic hero; then discuss hamlet as one or the other or a combination of the two concepts i have no idea if this is the definition she wants bc it’s off some website but here: When a hero confronts downfall, he is recognized as a tragic hero or protagonist. Aristotle, the Greek philosopher, characterizes these plays or stories as tragedies in which the main character is a tragic hero, who confronts his downfall due to fate, his mistake or any other social reason.shakspear tragic hero: i think this is the one with hamartia
i don’t really feel like doing this anymore so i’m not going to good luck yall

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