Hamlet Act V pg 1-9

Sir, in my heart there was a kind of fightingThat would not let me sleep. Methought I layWorse than the mutines in the bilboes. Rashly—And praised be rashness for it: let us knowOur indiscretion sometimes serves us wellWhen our deep plots do pall, and that should teach usThere’s a divinity that shapes our ends,Rough-hew them how we will— -Hamlet to Horatio-After Ophelia’s death and after Hamlet has read the letters ordering his execution-There was a kind of war in my brain that wouldn’t let me sleep. It was worse than being a captive in chains. Sometimes it’s good to be rash—sometimes it works out well to act impulsively when our careful plans lose steam. This should show us that there’s a God in heaven who’s always guiding us in the right direction, however often we screw up—
Up from my cabin,My sea-gown scarfed about me, in the darkGroped I to find out them, had my desire,Fingered their packet, and in fine withdrewTo mine own room again, making so bold(My fears forgetting manners) to unsealTheir grand commission, where I found, Horatio—O royal knavery!—an exact command,Larded with many several sorts of reasonsImporting Denmark’s health, and England’s too,With—ho!—such bugs and goblins in my lifeThat, on the supervise (no leisure bated,No, not to stay the grinding of the ax)My head should be struck off. -Hamlet to Horatio-after Hamlet has read the letters ordering his execution-Telling Horatio how he found the letter ordering his execution
Being thus benetted round with villainies—Ere I could make a prologue to my brains,They had begun the play—I sat me down,Devised a new commission, wrote it fair.I once did hold it, as our statists do,A baseness to write fair, and labored muchHow to forget that learning, but, sir, nowIt did me yeoman’s service. Wilt thou knowTh’ effect of what I wrote? -Hamlet to Horatio-after Hamlet has read the letters ordering his execution-Telling Horatio how he re-wrote the letter with neat handwriting
An earnest conjuration from the king,As England was his faithful tributary,As love between them like the palm might flourish,As peace should stiff her wheaten garland wearAnd stand a comma ‘tween their amities,And many suchlike “as’s” of great charge,That, on the view and knowing of these contents,Without debatement further, more or less,He should the bearers put to sudden death,Not shriving time allowed. -Hamlet to Horatio-after Hamlet has read the letters ordering his execution-Telling Horatio how he re-wrote the letter so that those who deliver the letter (R and G) are executed instead
Why, man, they did make love to this employment.They are not near my conscience. Their defeatDoes by their own insinuation grow.’Tis dangerous when the baser nature comesBetween the pass and fell incensèd pointsOf mighty opposites. -Hamlet to Horatio-after Hamlet has read the letters ordering his execution-Saying how R and G deserve to be executed and how it is dangerous to get caught in between mighty opponents
It will be short. The interim’s mine.And a man’s life’s no more than to say “one.”But I am very sorry, good Horatio,That to Laertes I forgot myself,For by the image of my cause I seeThe portraiture of his. I’ll court his favors.But sure the bravery of his grief did put meInto a towering passion. Blanks: Horatio, Laertes-Hamlet to Horatio-after Hamlet has read the letters ordering his execution-saying that he feels bad for lashing out at Laertes because they are (essentially) going through the same thing, and that he’ll be nicer to him
Thy state is the more gracious, for ’tis a vice to know him. He hath much land, and fertile. Let a beast be lord of beasts and his crib shall stand at the king’s mess. ‘Tis a chough, but, as I say, spacious in the possession of dirt. -Hamlet aside to Horatio-When Osric enters after Hamlet has told Horatio of the letters ordered to execute him (Hamlet)-Talking about how Osric is known: He owns a lot of good land. Give an animal a lot of money, and he’ll be welcome at the king’s table. He’s a jerk, but he owns a whole lot of dirt, so he’s treated well.
Nay, good my lord, for mine ease, in good faith. Sir, here is newly come to court Laertes, believe me, an absolute gentleman, full of most excellent differences, of very soft society and great showing. Indeed, to speak feelingly of him, he is the card or calendar of gentry, for you shall find in him the continent of what part a gentleman would see. Blank: Laertes-Osric to Hamlet-When Osric enters after Hamlet has told Horatio of the letters ordered to execute him (Hamlet)-Saying that Laertes has come to the court and how he acts like a perfect gentleman
Sir, his definement suffers no perdition in you, though I know to divide him inventorially would dizzy th’ arithmetic of memory, and yet but yaw neither, in respect of his quick sail. But in the verity of extolment, I take him to be a soul of great article, and his infusion of such dearth and rareness as, to make true diction of him, his semblable is his mirror. And who else would trace him? His umbrage, nothing more. -Hamlet to Osric-When Osric enters and tells Hamlet that Laertes has gone to court-Saying how he agrees with the fact that Laertes is perfect a gentleman and how no one is like him; praising Laertes
The king, sir, hath wagered with him six Barbary horses, against the which he has impawned, as I take it, six French rapiers and poniards with their assigns—as girdle, hangers, and so. Three of the carriages, in faith, are very dear to fancy, very responsive to the hilts, most delicate carriages, and of very liberal conceit. -Osric to Hamlet-When Osric enters and tells Hamlet that Laertes has gone to court-Talking about what Claudius has bet on Hamlet’s battle with Laertes
The king, sir, hath laid that in a dozen passes between yourself and him, he shall not exceed you three hits. He hath laid on twelve for nine, and it would come to immediate trial if your lordship would vouchsafe the answer. -Osric to Hamlet-When Osric enters and tells Hamlet that Laertes has gone to court-The king, sir, has bet that in a dozen rounds between you and Laertes, he won’t beat you by more than three hits. You could get started immediately if you’ll give me your answer.
Sir, I will walk here in the hall. If it please His Majesty, ’tis the breathing time of day with me. Let the foils be brought, the gentleman willing, and the king hold his purpose. I will win for him an I can. If not, I will gain nothing but my shame and the odd hits. -Hamlet to Osric-When Osric enters and tells Hamlet that Laertes wants to battle him-Hamlet is willing to have Claudius win his bet of Laertes winning
He did comply, sir, with his dug before he sucked it. Thus has he—and many more of the same bevy that I know the drossy age dotes on—only got the tune of the time and outward habit of encounter, a kind of yeasty collection, which carries them through and through the most fond and winnowed opinions; and do but blow them to their trial, the bubbles are out. -Hamlet to Horatio-After Osric goes off to tell Claudius that Hamlet has agreed to battle Laertes-talking about Osric: he’s patched together enough fancy phrases and trendy opinions to carry him along. But blow a little on this bubbly talk, and it’ll burst. There’s no substance here.

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