Hamlet Act One Vocab

liegeman vassal; devoted follower”And leigemen to the Dane” (1.1.17)
apparition a ghostly figure”Therefore I have entreated him along with us to watch the minutes of this night, that if again this apparition come he may approve our eyes and speak to it.” (1.1.32)
assail to attack violently with words or blows”Sit down awhile, and let us once again assail your ears, that are so fortified against our story, what we have two nights seen.” (1.1.36)
harrow torment; vex”It harrows me with fear and wonder.” (1.1.47)
usurp to take place of by or as if by force”What are thou that usurp’st this time of night…”(1.1.50)
avouch to vouch for; to declare as if fact”Before my God, I might not this believe without the sensible and true avouch of mine own eyes.” (1.1.55)
martial of, relating to, or suited for war or a warrior “Thus twice before, and jump at this dead hour, with martial stalk hath he gone by our watch.” (1.1.65)
bode to announce before hand; to indicate by signs”In what particular thought to work I know not, but in the gross and scope of mine opinion this bodes some strange eruption to our state.” (1.1.68)
portentous of, relating to, or constituting forshadowing”Well may it sort that this portentous figure comes armèd through our watch so like the king that was and is the question of these wars.” (1.1.110)
mote may; might”A mote it is to trouble the mind’s eye.” (1.1.111)
palmy marked by prosperity”In the most high and palmy state of Rome, a little ere the mightiest Julius fell…” (1.1.112)
tenant one who has the occupation or temporary possession of lands or tenements of another”The graves stood tenantless and the sheeted deadDid squeak and gibber in the Roman streets” (1.1.114)
precurse A forerunning”And even the like precurse of feared events, as harbingers preceding still the fates and prologue to the omen coming on.” (1.1.120)
harbinger anything that foreshadows a future event; omen; sign”As harbingers preceding still the fates and prologue to the omen coming on…” (1.1.121)
malicious full of, characterized by, or showing malice; malevolent; spiteful”For it is, as the air, invulnerable, and our vain blows malicious mockery.” (1.1.145)
auspicious favored by fortune; prosperous; fortunate”With an auspicious and a dropping eye…” (1.2.11)
dirge any composition resembling such a song or tune in character, as a poem of lament for the dead or solemn, mournful music”With mirth in funeral and with dirge in marriage” (1.2.12)
dole a dealing out or distributing, especially in charity.”In equal scale weighing delight and dole” (1.2.13)
suspiration a long, deep sigh”Nor windy suspiration of forced breath” (1.2.79)
filial of, relating to, or befitting a son or daughter”… the survivor bound in filial obligation for some term to do obsequious sorrow.” (1.2.51)
impious lacking in reverence or proper respect “But to persever in obstinate condolement is a course of impious stubbornness.” (1.2.94)
jocund marked by or suggestive of high spirits and lively mirthfulness ” …in grace whereof no jocund health that Denmark drinks today” (1.2.125)
dexterity mental skill or quickness; readiness and grace in physical activity”O most wicked speed, to post with such dexterity to incestuous sheets!” (1.2.157)
truncheon baton”Thrice he walked by their oppressed and fear-surprisèd eyes within his truncheon’s length” (1.2.204)
countenance face, visage; especially : the face as an indication of mood, emotion, or character “A countenance more in sorrow than in anger.” (1.2.229)
perchance perhaps, possibly”I will watch tonight. Perchance ‘Twill walk again.” (1.2.242)
requite to make suitable return to for a benefit or service or for an injury “I will requite your loves” (1.2.250)
besmirch sully, soil”Perhaps he loves you now, and now no soil nor cautel doth besmirch the virtue of his will, but you must fear.” (1.3.15)
circumscribe to constrict the range or activity of definitely and clearly “Carve for himself, for on his choice depends the safety and health of this whole state. And therefore must his choice be circumscribed unto the voice and yielding of that body whereof he is the head.” (1.3.22)
credent giving acceptance”Then weigh what loss your honor may sustain if with too credent ear you list his songs.” (1.3.30)
chary hesitant and vigilant about dangers and risks “The chariest maid is prodigal enough if she unmask her beauty to the moon.” (1.3.36)
prodigal yielding abundantly; luxuriant”The chariest maid is prodigal enough if she unmask her beauty to the moon.” (1.3.36)
libertine a person who is unrestrained by convention or morality”Do not, as some ungracious pastors do, show me the steep and thorny way to heaven whiles, like a puffed and reckless libertine, himself the primrose path of dalliance treads and recks not his own rede.” (1.3.49)
dalliance frivolous action “Do not, as some ungracious pastors do, show me the steep and thorny way to heaven whiles, like a puffed and reckless libertine, himself the primrose path of dalliance treads and recks not his own rede.” (1.3.49)
importune to press or urge with troublesome persistence”My lord, he hath importuned me with love in honorable fashion.” (1.3.110)
wassail riotous drinking : revelry”The king doth wake tonight and takes his rouse, keeps wassail and the swaggering upspring reels” (1.4.10)
draught available to be drawn from a cask rather than from a sealed bottle”And, as he drains his draughts of Rhenish down” (1.4.11)
traduce to expose to shame or blame by means of falsehood and misrepresentation “This heavy-headed revel east and west makes us traduced and taxed of other nations.” (1.4.20)
cerement a shroud for the dead”Why thy canonized bones, hearsed in death, have burst their cerements” (1.4.51)
ponderous of very great weight “Wherein we saw thee quietly interred, hath oped his ponderous and marble jaws to cast thee up again.” (1.4.53)
leperous infectious; corrupting; poisonous”And in the porches of my ears did pour the leperous distilment” (1.5.64)
distillment poison?”And in the porches of my ears did pour the leperous distilment” (1.5.64)
matin the first of the seven canonical hours”The glowworm shows the matin to be near” (1.5.89)
pernicious evil; wicked”O most pernicious woman! O villain, villain, smiling, damnèd villain!” (1.5.105)
arrant downright; thorough; unmitigated; notorious”There’s ne’er a villain dwelling in all DenmarkBut he’s an arrant knave.” (1.5.126)
ambiguous open to or having several possible meanings or interpretations; equivocal”Or by pronouncing of some doubtful phrase, as “Well, well, we know,” or “We could an if we would,” or “If we list to speak,” or “There be an if they might,” or such ambiguous giving out” (1.5.179)
sinew the source of strength, power, or vigor”And you, my sinews, grow not instant old,But bear me stiffly up.” (1.5.94)

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