GCSE ENGLISH LIT – ROMEO AND JULIET – CONFLICT QUOTES

PROLOGUE: From ancient grudge break to new mutiny PROLOGUE: From ancient grudge break to new mutinyThis quotation from the prologue sets the scene by showing the key conflict between the Capulets and Montagues, also foreshadowing the fighting in the play.
TYBALT: Peace? I hate the word, As I hate hell, all Montagues, and thee. TYBALT: Peace? I hate the word, As I hate hell, all Montagues, and thee.This quotation is said to Benvolio by Tybalt in Act 1, Scene 1. This quote shows how dire the conflict between the two houses are and could potentially show the stupidity of the conflict as Tybalt has no ground to hate Benvolio apart from the ancient grudge, this could show prejudice.
TYBALT: Now by the stock and honour of my kin to strike him dead I hold it not a sin. TYBALT: Now by the stock and honour of my kin to strike him dead I hold it not a sin.This quotation is from Act 1, Scene 5 at the Capulet party. Tybalt is talking to Capulet, his uncle about Romeo who has infiltrated the Capulet party. Outraged by this, he wants to kill Romeo to honour his family and would not consider it a crime to kill him, as he is a Montague. This quotation also shows how futile the feud between the houses are as Tybalts only ground for murdering Romeo is the fact that he crashed a party.
BENVOLIO: I do but keep the peace. Put up thy sword or manage it to part these men with me. BENVOLIO: I do but keep the peace. Put up thy sword or manage it to part these men with me.This quote is from the quarrel between the two houses in Act 1 Scene 1. Benvolio represents peace and morality throughout the play and asks Tybalt to put his sword down or use it to end the conflict. Tybalt does not agree with this and insists on fighting Benvolio anyways, despite the citizens trying to beat both of them down. This could show how pathetic and needless the conflict between the houses is as Tybalt would rather fight and be beat down than make peace, displaying the futility of the conflict.
CAPULET: My sword, I say! Old Montague is come, And flourishes his blade in spite of me. CAPULET: Old Montague is come, And flourishes his blade in spite of me.This quotation is from Act 1, Scene 1 in which Capulet and Montague meet in the streets of Verona. Capulet calls for his sword to fight Montague simply because he is holding a sword. This shows the futility and pettiness of the grudge as they have no reason to fight, yet they both still want to.
BENVOLIO: I pray thee good Mercutio, let’s retire… these hot days is the mad blood stirring. BENVOLIO: I pray thee good Mercutio, let’s retire… these hot days is the mad blood stirring.This quotation is taken from Act 3, Scene 1 in which the tension is rising before the fight between Mercutio, Romeo and Tybalt. Once again, Benvolio acts as the voice of reason and asks Mercutio to leave as people are becoming more hot and angry. This foreshadows the death of Mercutio and Tybalt and highlights how unnessesary the house quarrel is as people are dying needlessly.

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