Frankenstein Chapter 6 Important Quotes

The blue lake, and snow-clad mountains, they never change; — and I think our placid home, and our contented hearts are regulated by the same immutable laws. My trifling occupations take up my time and amuse me Elizabeth describes her domestic homelife by comparing it to the calm of the beautiful in nature. The lake is a symbol of peace and idealized childhood safety. A sort of dramatic irony, as we know that Victor has already jeopardized all this. Patronizing account of a woman’s domestic role.
The peasants were dancing, and every one we met appeared gay and happy. My own spirits were high, and I bounded along with feelings of unbridled joy and hilarity The peasants were dancing, and every one we met appeared gay and happy. My own spirits were high, and I bounded along with feelings of unbridled joy and hilarityThe concluding lines of Chapter 6 spell happiness and hyperbolic joy – evidently precluding an immense fall in the mood of the novel, just before William’s death

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