English- The Odyssey: Central Ideas and Character Motivation

He had in wizardry among the Cyclops,and these things he foretold for time to come:my great eye lost, and at Odysseus’ hands.Always I had in mind some giant, armedin giant force, would come against me here.But this, but you – small, pitiful and twiggy -you put me down with wine, you blinded me. -The Odyssey, HomerWhat deeper meaning is revealed through the Cyclops’s interpretation of the prophecy? A.) Ignoring a prophecy leads to punishment by the gods.B.) Epic heroes can have qualities that one would expect only a supernatural being to have.C.) People are expected to treat guests with respect, and hospitality is rewarded.D.) Home is the best place to be. B.) Epic heroes can have qualities that one would expect only a supernatural being to have.
But this, but you – small, pitiful and twiggy -you put me down with wine, you blinded me. Come back, Odysseus, and I’ll treat you well,praying the god of earthquake to befriend you -his son I am, for he by his avowalfathered me, and, if he will, he mayheal me of this black wound – he and no otherof all the happy gods or mortal men.’Few words I shouted in reply to him:’If I could take your life I would and takeyour time away, and hurl you down to hell!The god of earthquake could not heal you there!’At this he stretched his hands out in his darknesstoward the sky of stars, and prayed Poseidon:’O hear me, lord, blue girdler of the islands,if I am thine indeed, and thou art father:grant that Odysseus, raider of cities, never see his home-The Odyssey, HomerWhat motivates Cyclops to ask Poseidon to interfere with Odysseus’s journey home? He realizes that Odysseus was destined to take his eye. He states that he was told beforehand that his eye would be blinded by Odysseus and that if he joined his once more he would treat him kind and respectively rather than attempt to murder and feast on him.
Sample Response: The Cyclops is angry that Odysseus, a weak and tiny man, was able to blind him and trick him. To make matters worse, Odysseus has no regrets, and he does not apologize even though the Cyclops offers to treat him well if he returns. Instead, Odysseus insults Cyclops more than once during his escape. Cyclops knows that the gods have power over men’s lives, and this is his only opportunity for revenge. Thus, he is motivated to seek revenge against Odysseus.What information did you include in your response? Check all that apply.A.) The Cyclops offers friendship to Odysseus, but he declines.B.) Odysseus continues to insult the Cyclops.C.) The Cyclops is angry because he was blinded and tricked.D.) The Cyclops wants revenge.E.) The gods have power over men’s lives. A.) The Cyclops offers friendship to Odysseus, but he declines.C.) The Cyclops is angry because he was blinded and tricked.
In a smithyone sees a white-hot axehead or an adzeplunged and wrung in a cold tub, screeching steam-the way they make soft iron hale and hard-:just so that eyeball hissed around the spike.-The Odyssey, HomerBased on the epic simile, how should the poem’s listener picture the Cyclops’s eye? A.) like a smithy’s shop full of interesting toolsB.) like a soft, cold piece of ironC.) like a hissing piece of hot metal in cold water C.) like a hissing piece of hot metal in cold water
Read the excerpt from The Odyssey.My heart beat high now at the chance of action,and drawing the sharp sword from my hip I wentalong his flank to stab him where the midriffholds the liver. I had touched the spotwhen sudden fear stayed me: if I killed him we perished there as well, for we could nevermove his ponderous doorway slab aside.So we were left to groan and wait for morning.What prevents Odysseus from killing the sleeping Cyclops?A.) He thinks he can reason with the Cyclops in the morning.B.) He wants to make the Cyclops his ally and friend.C.) He knows that they cannot move the boulder blocking the doorway.D.) He feels sorry for the Cyclops who lives all by himself. C.) He knows that they cannot move the boulder blocking the doorway.
Which excerpts contain examples of epic similes? Check all that apply.A.) and they would put one cupful—ruby-colored, honey-smooth—in twenty more of water,but still the sweet scent hovered like a fume over the winebowl.B.)Or are you wandering rogues, who cast your lives like dice, and ravage other folk by sea?’C.) Then he dismembered them and made his meal, gaping and crunching like a mountain lion—everything: innards, flesh, and marrow bones.D.) When the young Dawn with finger tips of rose lit up the world, the Cyclops built a fire and milked his handsome ewes, all in due order, putting the sucklings to the mothers. B.)Or are you wandering rogues, who cast your lives like dice, and ravage other folk by sea?’C.) Then he dismembered them and made his meal, gaping and crunching like a mountain lion—everything: innards, flesh, and marrow bones.
Read the excerpt from The Odyssey.Neither reply nor pity came from him, but in one stride he clutched at my companions and caught two in his hands like squirming puppies to beat their brains out, spattering the floor.The epic simile in this excerpt shows A.) how helpless Odysseus’s men are in the clutches of the Cyclops.B.) how violently and uncivilized the Cyclops behaves himself.C.) that Cyclops is enormous in comparison to Odysseus and his men.D.) that there is no possible escape for Odysseus and his men. A.) how helpless Odysseus’s men are in the clutches of the Cyclops.
Read the excerpt from The Odyssey.In the next land we found were Cyclopes, giants, louts, without a law to bless them.In ignorance leaving the fruitage of the earth in mysteryto the immortal gods, they neither plownor sow by hand, nor till the ground, though grain— wild wheat and barley—grows untended, andwine-grapes, in clusters, ripen in heaven’s rain.Cyclopes have no muster and no meeting,no consultation or old tribal ways,but each one dwells in his own mountain cave dealing out rough justice to wife and child,indifferent to what the others do.What inference can be made about the Cyclopes?A.) They are hospitable and welcoming to visitors of their homes.B.) They are uncivilized creatures who are potentially dangerous.C.) They will band together against common enemies, if needed.D.) They value education and sophistication above everything else. B.) They are uncivilized creatures who are potentially dangerous.
Read the excerpt from The Odyssey.’We are from Troy, Achaeans, blown off courseby shifting gales on the Great South Sea;homeward bound, but taking routes and ways uncommon; so the will of Zeus would have it.We served under Agamemnon, son of Atreus—the whole world knows what cityhe laid waste, what armies he destroyed.It was our luck to come here; here we stand, beholden for your help, or any giftsyou give—as custom is to honor strangers.We would entreat you, great Sir, have a carefor the gods’ courtesy; Zeus will avenge the unoffending guest.’He answered thisfrom his brute chest, unmoved:’You are a ninny,or else you come from the other end of nowhere,telling me, mind the gods! We Cyclopes care not a whistle for your thundering Zeusor all the gods in bliss; we have more force by far.I would not let you go for fear of Zeus—you or your friends—unless I had a whim to.What can be inferred about the Cyclops?A.) He lives in fear of Zeus and all the rest of the Greek gods.B.) He sided and fought with the Trojans during the war.C.) He is eager to provide food and shelter to his guests.D.) He does not live by the same rules and customs as the Greeks. D.) He does not live by the same rules and customs as the Greeks.
Read the excerpt from The Odyssey.`Nohbdy, Nohbdy’s tricked me, Nohbdy’s ruined me!’ To this rough shout they made a sage reply:’Ah well, if nobody has played you foul there in your lonely bed, we are no use in pain given by great Zeus. Let it be your father, Poseidon Lord, to whom you pray.’So sayingthey trailed away. And I was filled with laughterto see how like a charm the name deceived them.In the excerpt, the word “charm” is being compared with .A.) nobodyB.) plainC.) laughterD.) name D.) name
Read the excerpt from The Odyssey.’O Cyclops! Would you feast on my companions? Puny, am I, in a Caveman’s hands?How do you like the beating that we gave you,you damned cannibal? Eater of guestsunder your roof! Zeus and the gods have paid you!’According to this excerpt, OdysseusA.) is fearful of the Cyclops.B.) is prideful and overly confident.C.) has been weakened by the Cyclops.D.) has regrets about staying on the island. B.) is prideful and overly confident.
Read the excerpt from The Odyssey.’My ship?Poseidon Lord, who sets the earth a-tremble, broke it up on the rocks at your land’s end. A wind from seaward served him, drove us there. We are survivors, these good men and I.’What motivates Odysseus to tell a lie to the Cyclops?A.) Odysseus knows that Poseidon is the Cyclops’ father.B.) Odysseus is afraid the Cyclops will steal their ship.C.) Odysseus does not want to reveal their only means of escape.D.) Odysseus does not know what has happened to his ship. C.) Odysseus does not want to reveal their only means of escape.
Read the excerpt from The Odyssey.but Cyclops went on filling up his bellywith manflesh and great gulps of whey,then lay down like a mast among his sheep.What two unlike elements are being compared in this simile?A.) the Cyclops and the mast of a shipB.) the Cyclops’ belly and his sheepC.) manflesh and gulps of wheyD.) a mast and a flock of sheep A.) the Cyclops and the mast of a ship
Read the excerpt from The Odyssey.’AyeHe’ll smash our timbers and our heads together!’I would not heed them in my glorying spirit, but let my anger flare and yelled:’Cyclops,if ever mortal man inquirehow you were put to shame and blinded, tell him Odysseus, raider of cities, took your eye: Laertes’ son, whose home’s on Ithaca!’What motivates Odysseus to reveal his name and put his men in more danger?A.) anger and prideB.) gratitude and reliefC.) weakness and fearD.) joy and excitement A.) anger and pride

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