English- Macbeth Figures of Speech

“This is the sergeant who LIKE A GOOD AND HARDY SOLDIER fought ‘Gainst my captivity” Simile
“Doubtful it stood; AS TWO SPENT SWIMMERS, THAT DO CLING TOGETHER AND CHOKE THEIR ART” Simile
“AS THICK AS HAIL came post with post” Simile
“But LIKE A MAN he died” Simile
“Kind gentle men, your pains, Are register’d, WHERE EVERYDAY I TURN THE LEAF TO READ THEM” Metaphor
“I have bought Golden opinions from all sorts of people, WHICH WOULD BE WORN NOW IN THEIR NEWEST GLOSS” Metaphor
“Life’s but a walking shadow, A POOR PLAYER THAT STRUTS AND FRETS HIS HOUR UPON THE STAGE” Metaphor
“THEY HAVE TIED ME TO A STAKE” Metaphor
“My GASHES CRY FOR HELP” Personification
“I think our country sink beneath the yoke; IT WEEPS, IT BLEEDS” Personification
“Our CASTLE’S STRENGTH WILL LAUGH A siege to scorn” Personification
“Come, you spirits That tend on mortal thoughts” Apostrophe
“Come, thick night, And pall thee in the dunnest smoke of hell” Apostrophe
“Come, let me clutch thee. I have thee not, and yet I see thee still” Apostrophe
“What hands are here? ha! THEY PLUCK OUT MINE EYES. Will all great Neptune’s ocean wash this blood clean from my hand? No, this hand will rather. The MULTITUDINOUS SEAS INCARNADINE, MAKING THE GREEN ONE RED.” Hyperbole
“THY CROWN DOES SCAR MINE EYE-BALLS” Hyperbole
“Let us seek out some desolate shad, and there, WEEP OUR SAD BOSOMS EMPTY” Hyperbole
“This tyrant, WHOSE SOLE NAME BLISTERS OUR TONGUES” Hyperbole
“He that’s coming MUST BE PROVIDED FOR: and you shall put THIS NIGHT’S GREAT BUSINESS into my dispatch” Euphemism
“Is he DISPATCH’D” Euphemism
“So FOUL AND FAIR a day I have not seen” Antithesis
“Look like the INNOCENT FLOWER. BUT BE THE SERPENT UNDER’T” Antithesis
“FALSE FACE must hide what the FALSE HEART doth know.” Antithesis
“It cannot Be call’d OUR MOTHER, but OUR GRAVE” Antithesis
“Was not that nobly done? Any, and wisely too; For ‘twould have angered any heart alive To hear the men deny’t” Irony
“How does my wife’s? Why, WELL. And all my children? WELL too. The tyrant has not batter’d at their peace? No; THEY WERE WELL AT PEACE when I did leave ’em” Irony
“That trusted home Might yet enkindle you unto the CROWN”Crown is representing that of king Metonymy
“A little water clears us of this DEED”Deed is substituted for blood Metonymy
“I drink to the general joy o’ the whole TABLE”Table refers to those who are seated Metonymy
“Where the Norwegian banners Flout the sky and Fan our people cold” Alliteration
“And yet Wouldst Wrongly Win” Alliteration
“After liFe’s FitFul Fever he sleeps well” Alliteration

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