Doyle–HARDCORE quotes for Romeo and Juliet

Chorus “From forth the fatal loins of these two foesA pair of star-crossed lovers take their life…Doth with their death bury thier parents’ strife…Which but their children’s end, naught could remove, Is now the two hours’ traffic of our stage…” (Act I, prologue)
Benvolio “Put up your swords; you know not what you do.” (Act I, scene i)
Tybalt “What, drawn, and talk of peace? I hate the wordAs I hate hell, all Montagues, and thee.” (Act I, scene i)
Prince Escalus “…Three civil brawls, bred of an airy wordBy thee, old Capulet, and Montague,Have thrice disturbed the quiet of our streets…If ever you disturb our streets again,Your lives shall pay the forfeit of the peace…” (Act I, scene i)
Romeo “In sadness, cousin, I do love a woman.” (Act I, scene i)
Romeo “…Why then, O brawling love, O loving hate,O anything, of nothing first created!O heavy lightness, serious vanity,Misshapen chaos of well-seeming forms, Feather of lead, bright smoke, cold fire, sick health,Still-waking sleep, that is not what it is!” (scene i)
Benvolio “By giving liberty unto thine eyes.Examine other beauties.” (Act I, scene i)
Lord Capulet “Let two more summers wither in their prideEre we may think her ripe to be a bride…” (Act I, scene ii)
Paris “Younger than she are happy mothers made.” (Act I, scene ii)
Lord Capulet “…Earth hath swallowed all my hopes but she,She is the hopeful lady of my earth.But woo her, gentle Paris, get her heart;My will to her consent is but a part …” (Act I, scene ii)
Servant of Capulet “Find them out whose names are written here? It is written that the shoemaker should meddle with his yard and the tailor with his last, the fisher with his pencil and the painter with his nets; but I am sent to find those persons whose names are here writ, and can never find what names the writing person hath here writ. I must to the learned…” (Act I, scene ii)
Benvolio “…Compare her face with some that I shall show,And I will make thee think thy swan a crow…” (Act I, scene ii)
Nurse “I’ll lay fourteen of my teeth-And yet, to my teen be it spoken, I have but four-She is not fourteen….”(Act I, scene iii)
Lady Capulet “I was your mother much upon these yearsThat you are now a maid…” (Act I, scene iii)
Nurse “…Why, he’s a man of wax.” (Act I, scene iii)
Lady Capulet “…Read o’er the volume of young Paris’ face,And find delight writ there with beauty’s pen…” (Act I, scene iii)
Romeo “…You have dancing shoesWith nimble soles; I have a soul of leadSo stakes me to the ground I cannot move.” (Act I, scene iv)
Romeo “I dreamt a dream tonight.” (Act I, scene iv)
Mercutio “O, then I see Queen Mab hath been with you.” (Act I, scene iv)
Mercutio “…True, I talk of dreams;Which are the children of an idle brain…” (Act I, scene iv)
Romeo “I fear, too early; for my mind misgivesSome consequence, yet hanging in the stars,Shall bitterly begin his fearful dateWith this night’s revels and expire the termOf a despised life, closed in my breast, By some vile forfeit of untimely death…” (Act I, scene iv)
Lord Capulet “Welcome, gentlemen! Ladies that have their toesUnplagued with corns will walk a bout with you…” (Act I, scene v)
Romeo “O, she doth teach the torches to burn bright.” (Act I, scene v)
Romeo “…Did my heart love till now? Forswear it, sight!For I ne’er saw true beauty till this night.” (Act I, scene v)
Tybalt “This by his voice, should be a Montague…Now, by the stock and honor of my kin,To strike him dead I hold it not a sin.” (Act I, scene v)
Lord Capulet “…And, to say truth, Verona brags of himTo be a virtuous and well-governed youth…” (Act I, scene v)
Juliet “You kiss by th’ book.” (Act I, scene v)
Romeo “O dear account! My life is my foe’s debt!” (Act I, scene v)
Nurse “His name is Romeo, and a Montague,The only son of your great enemy.” (Act I, scene v)
Juliet “My only love sprung from my only hate!To early seen unknown, and known too late!” (Act I, scene v)
Chorus “…Now Romeo is beloved and loves again, Alike bewitched by the charm of looks…” (Act II, Prologue)
Chorus “…And she as much in love, her means much lessTo meet her new beloved anywhere…” (Act II, Prologue)
Romeo “Can I go forward when my heart is here?Turn back, dull earth, and find thy center out.” (Act II, Scene i)
Romeo “But soft! What light through yonder window breaks?It is the East, and Juliet is the sun!” (Act II, Scene ii)
Juliet “O Romeo, Romeo! Wherefore art thou Romeo?Deny thy father and refuse thy name;Or, if thou wilt not, be but sworn my love,And I’ll no longer be a Capulet.” (Act II, Scene ii)
Juliet “…What’s in a name? That which we call a roseBy any other name would smell as sweet…” (Act II, Scene ii)
Romeo “I take thee at thy word.Call me but love, and I’ll be new baptized…”(Act II, Scene ii)
Juliet “O, swear not by the moon, th’ inconstant moon,That monthly changes in her circle orb,Lest that thy love prove likewise variable.” (Act II, Scene ii)
Juliet “…My bounty is as boundless as the sea,My love as deep; the more I give to thee,The more I have, for both are infinite…” (Act II, Scene ii)
Juliet “…If that thy bent of love be honorable,Thy purpose marriage, send me word tomorrow,By one that I’ll procure to come to thee…” (Act II, Scene ii)
Juliet “…Good night, good night! Parting is such sweet sorrowThat I shall say good night till it be morrow.” (Act II, Scene ii)
Romeo “…I have been feasting with mine enemy,Where on a sudden one hath wounded meThat’s by me wounded…” (Act II, Scene iii)
Friar Lawrence “Holy Saint Francis! What a change is here!Is Rosaline, that thou didst love so dear,So soon forsaken? Young men’s love then liesNot truly in their hearts, but in their eyes…” (Act II, Scene iii)
Friar Lawrence “…And art thou changed? Pronounce this sentence then:Women may fall when there’s no strength in men.” (Act II, Scene iii)
Romeo “I pray thee chide me not. Her I love nowDoth grace for grace and love for love allow.The other did not so.” (Act II, Scene iii)
Romeo “O, let us hence! I stand on sudden haste.” (Act II, Scene iii)
Friar Lawrence “Wisely and slow. They stumble that run fast.” (Act II, Scene iii)
Romeo “A gentleman, nurse, that loves to hear himself talkand will speak more in a minute than he will stand toin a month.” (Act II, Scene iv)
Nurse “…I anger her sometimes, and tell her that Paris is the properer man; but I’ll warrant you, when I say so, she looks as pale as any clout [cloth]in the versal world [universe]…” (Act II, Scene iv)
Juliet “…Now is the sun upon the highmost hillOf this day’s journey, and from nine till twelveIs three long hours yet she is not come.Had she affections and warm youthful blood,She would be as swift in motion as a ball…But old folks, many feign [act] as they were dead–Unwieldy, slow, heavy and pale as lead.” (Act II, Scene v)
Juliet “I would thou hadst my bones, and I thy news,Nay, come, I pray thee speak. Good, good nurse, speak.” (Act II, Scene v)
Nurse “Then hie you hence to Friar Lawrence’ cell;There stays a husband to make you a wife.” (Act II, Scene v)
Romeo “…Do thou but close our hands with holy words,Then love-devouring death do what he dare–It is enough I may but call her mine.” (Act II, Scene vi)
Friar Lawrence “These violent delights have violent ends…Therefore love moderately: long love doth so;Too swift arrives as tardy as too slow.” (Act II, Scene vi)
Friar Lawrence “Come, come with me, and we will make short work;For, by your leaves, you shall not stay aloneTill Holy Church incorporate two in one.” (Act II Scene vi)
Benvolio “I pray thee, good Mercutio, let’s retire. The day is hot, the Capels are abroad,And, if we meet, we shall not ‘scape a brawl,For now, these hot days, is the mad blood stirring.” (Act III, scene i)
Mercutio “And but one word with one of us? Couple it withsomething; make it a word and a blow.” (Act III, scene i)
Romeo “I do protest I never injured thee,But love thee better than thou canst devise [understand, imagine]Till thou shalt know the reason of my love;And so, good Capulet, which name I tender [value]As dearly as mine own, be satisfied.” (Act III, scene i)
Mercutio “O calm, dishonorable, vile submission!” (Act III, scene i)
Romeo “Draw Benvolio; beat down their weapons.Gentlemen, for shame! For this outrage!…the Prince expressly hath Forbid this bandying in Verona streets…” (Act III, scene i)
Mercutio “I am hurt. A plague a’ both houses! I am sped.Is he gone and hath nothing?” (Act III, scene i)
Mercutio “No, ’tis not so deep as a well, nor so wide as a churchdoor; but ’tis enough, ’twill serve. Ask for me tomorrow, and you shall find me a grave man. I am peppered [finished off]…” (Act III, scene i)
Romeo “This gentleman, the Prince’s near ally [relative],My very friend, hath got his mortal hurt In my behalf–my reputation stainedWith Tybalt’s slander–Tybalt, that an hour Hath been my cousin. O sweet Juliet,Thy beauty hath made me effeminateAnd in my temper soft’ned valor’s steel!” (Act III, scene i)
Benvolio “Romeo, away, be gone!The citizens are up, and Tybalt’s slain,Stand not amazed. The Prince will doom thee deathIf thou art taken. Hence, be gone away!” (Act III, scene i)
Romeo “O, I am fortune’s fool!” (Act III, scene i)
Lady Capulet “Tybalt, my cousin! O my brother’s child!O Prince! O cousin! Husband! O, the blood is spilledOf my dear kinsman! Prince, as thou art true, For blood of ours shed blood of Montague…” (Act III, scene i)
Lady Capulet “He is a kinsman to the Montague;Affection makes him false, he speaks not true.Some twenty of them fought in this black strife,And all those twenty could but kill one life,I beg for justice, which thou, Prince, must give.Romeo slew Tybalt; Romeo must not live.” (Act III, scene i)
Lord Montague “Not Romeo, Prince; he was Mercutio’s friend;His fault concludes but what the law should end,The life of Tybalt.” (Act III, scene i)
Prince Escalus “And for that offenseImmediately we do exile him hence.I have an interest in your hate’s proceeding.My blood for your rude brawls doth lie a-bleeding;But I’ll amerce [punish] you with so strong a fineThat you shall all repent the loss of mine…” (Act III, scene i)
Juliet “O, I have bought the mansion of a love,But not possessed it; and though I am sold, Not yet enjoyed. So tedious is this dayAs is the night before some festival To an impatient child that hath new robesAnd may not wear them…” (Act III, scene ii)
Juliet “Ay me! What news? Why dost thou wring thy hands?” (Act III, scene ii)
Nurse “O Tybalt, Tybalt, the best friend I had!O courteous Tybalt! Honest gentleman! That ever I should live to see thee dead!” (Act III, scene ii)
Nurse “Tybalt is gone, and Romeo banished;Romeo that killed him, he is banished.” (Act III, scene ii)
Juliet “O serpent heart, hid with a flow’ring face!Did ever dragon keep so fair a cave?Beautiful tyrant! Fiend angelical!Dove-feathered raven! Wolvish-ravening lamb!…Just opposite to what thou justly seem’st–…Was ever book containing such vile matterSo fairly bound? O, that deceit should dwellIn such a gorgeous palace!” (Act III, scene ii)
Juliet “‘Romeo is banished’–to speak that wordIs father, mother, Tybalt, Romeo, Juliet,All slain, all dead….” (Act III, scene ii)
Friar Lawrence “A gentler judgment vanish from his lips–Not body’s death, but body’s banishment.” (Act III, scene iii)
Romeo “Ha, banishment? Be merciful, say ‘death’;For exile hath more terror in his look,Much more than death. Do not say ‘banishment.'” (Act III, scene iii)
Friar Lawrence “O, then I see that madmen have no ears.” (Act III, scene iii)
Romeo “Thou canst speak of that thou dost not feel.Wert thou as young as I, Juliet thy love,An hour but married, Tybalt murdered,Doting like me, and like me banished,then mightst thou speak…” (Act III, scene iii)
Nurse “…Even so lies she,Blubb’ring and weeping, weeping and blubb’ring.Stand up, stand up! Stand, and you be a man.For Juliet’s sake, for her sake, rise and stand!” (Act III, scene iii)
Friar Lawrence “…Art thou a man? Thy form cries out thou art;Thy tears are womanish, thy wild acts denoteThe unreasonable fury of a beast…” (Act III, scene iii)
Friar Lawrence “What rouse thee, man! Thy Juliet is alive, For whose dear sake thou wast but lately dead.There art thou happy. Tybalt would kill thee,But thou slewest Tybalt. There art thou happy.The law, that threat’ned death, becomes thy friendAnd turns it to exile. There are thou happy. A pack of blessings light upon thy back; Happiness courts thee in her best array…” (Act III, scene iii)
Friar Lawrence “Go get thee to thy love, as was decreed,Ascend her chamber, hence and comfort her.But look thou stay not till the watch be set,For then thou canst not pass to Mantua,Where thou shalt live till we can find a timeTo blaze [announce publicly] your marriage, reconcile your friends,Beg pardon of the Prince, and call thee back With twenty hundred thousand times more joyThan thou went’st forth in lamentation…” (Act III, scene iii)
Lord Capulet “Sir, Paris, I will make a desperate tender [risky offer]Of my child’s love. I think she will be ruledIn all respects by me; nay more, I doubt it not…” (Act III, scene iv)
Juliet “Wilt thou be gone? It is not yet near day.It was the nightingale, and not the lark,That pierced the fearful hollow of thine ear…” (Act III, scene v)
Romeo “Let me be ta’en, let me be put to death.I am content, so thou wilt have it so…I have more care to stay than will to go.Come, death, and welcome! Juliet wills it so.How is’t my soul? Let’s talk; it is not day.” (Act III, scene v)
Juliet “I must hear from thee every day in the hour,For in a minute there are many days.O, by this count I shall be much in yearsEre I again behold my Romeo!” (Act III, scene v)
Juliet “…I have an ill-divining [predicting evil] soul!Methinks I see thee, now thou art so low,As one dead in the bottom of a tomb.Either my eyesight fails, or thou lookest pale.” (Act III, scene v)
Lady Capulet “…Some grief shows much love;But much grief shows still some want of wit.” (Act III, scene v)
Lady Capulet “….I’ll send to one in Mantua,Where that same banished runagate [renegade; runaway] doth live,Shall givehim such an unaccustomed dram[unexpected dose of poison] That he shall soon keep Tybalt company…” (Act III, scene v)
Lady Capulet “Well, well, thou hast a careful [considerate] father, child;One who, to put thee from thy heaviness,Hath sorted out [selected] a sudden day of joyThat thou expects not nor I looked not for.” (Act III, scene v)
Lady Capulet “Ay, sir; but she will none, she gives you thanks.I would the fool were married to her grave.” (Act III, scene v)
Lord Capulet “Hang thee, young baggage! Disobedient wretch!I tell there what–get thee to church a Thursday Or never after look me in the face…” (Act III, scene v)
Lord Capulet “…Thursday is near; lay hand on heart, advise[consider]:And you be mine, I’ll give you to my friend;And you be not, hang, beg, starve, die in the streets,For, by my soul, I’ll ne’er acknowledge thee,Nor what is mine shall never do thee good.Trust to’t. Bethink you. I’ll not be forsworn[made to violate my promise].” (Act III, scene v)
Nurse “Then, since the case so stands as now it doth,I think it best you married with the County.O, he’s a lovely gentleman!Romeo’s a dishclout to him [dishcloth compared w/ him]…” (Act III, scene v)
Juliet “Speak’st thou from thy heart?” (Act III, scene v)
Juliet “Ancient damnation! [Old devil!] O most wicked fiend!…Go counselor!Thou and my bosom henceforth shall be twain. [You will from now on be separated from my trust.]I’ll to the friar to know his remedy.If all else fail, myself have power to die.” (Act III, scene v)
Friar Lawrence “You say you do not know the lady’s mind.Uneven is the course. I like it not.” (Act IV, scene i)
Paris “…Now, sir, her father counts it dangerousThat she do give her sorrow so much sway,And in his wisdom hastes our marriageTo stop the inundation of her tears…” (Act IV, scene i)
Friar Lawrence [Aside] “I would I knew not why it should be slowed.” (Act IV, scene i)
Juliet “That may be, sir, when I may be a wife.” (Act IV, scene i)
Juliet “I will confess to you that I love him.” (Act IV, scene i)
Paris “Thy face is mine, and thou hast slandered it.” (Act IV, scene i)
Juliet “…Come weep with me, past hope, past care, past help!” (Act IV, scene i)
Juliet “Tell me not, Friar, that thou hearest of this,Unless thou tell me how I may prevent it.If in thy wisdom thou canst give no help,Do thou but call my resolution wise,And with this knife I’ll help it presently…” (Act IV, scene i)
Friar Lawrence “Hold, daughter, I do spy a kind of hope,Which craves as desperate an executionAs that is desperate which we could prevent…” (Act IV, scene i)
Friar Lawrence “Thou hast the strength of will to slay thyself,This is it likely thou wilt undertakeA thing like death to chide away this shame,That cop’st with death himself to ‘scape from it;And if thou darest, I’ll give thee remedy…” (Act IV, scene i)
Juliet “…bid me go into a new-made grave And hide me with a dead man in his shroud–Things that, to hear them told, have made me tremble–And I will do it without fear or doubt,To live an unstained wife to my sweet love.” (Act IV, scene i)
Friar Lawrence “…Now, when the bridegroom in the morning comesTo rouse thee from thy bed, there art thou dead…” (Act IV, scene i)
Juliet “Love give me strength, and strength shall help afford…” (Act IV, scene i)
Juliet “By holy Lawrence to fall prostrate hereTo beg your pardon. Pardon, I beseech you.Henceforward I am ever ruled by you.” (Act IV, scene ii)
Lord Capulet “Send for the County. Go tell him of this.I’ll have this knot knit up tomorrow morning.” (Act IV, scene ii)
Lord Capulet “…Now, afore God, this reverend holy friar,All our whole city is much bound to him.” (Act IV, scene ii)
Lord Capulet “…My heart is wondrous lightSince this same wayward girl is so reclaimed.” (Act IV, scene ii)
Juliet “…So please you, let me now be left alone,And let the Nurse this night sit up with you,For I am sure you have your hands full allIn this so sudden business.” (Act IV, scene iii)
Juliet “Farewell! God knows when we shall meet again.I have a faint cold fear thrills through my veinsThat almost freezes up the heat of life.” (Act IV, scene iii)
Juliet “My dismal scene I needs must act alone.Come, vial. [She takes out the vial.]What if this mixture do not work at all?Shall I be married then tomorrow morning?[She takes out her knife and puts it down beside her.]No, no, this shall forbid it. Lie thou there…” (Act IV, scene iii)
Juliet “…What if it be a poison which the friarSubtly hath minist’red to have me dead,Lest in this marriage should he be dishonoredBecause he married me before to Romeo?” (Act IV, scene iii)
Juliet “…Stay, Tybalt, stay!Romeo, Romeo, Romeo! I drink to thee.” (Act IV, scene iii)
Nurse “…How sound is she asleep!I needs must wake her. Madam, madam, madam!Ay, let the County take you in your bed,He’ll fright you up, i’ faith…” (Act IV, scene v)
Lord Capulet “…Life and these lips have long been separated.Death lies on her like an untimely frostUpon the sweetest flower of all the field.” (Act IV, scene v)
Lord Capulet “Ready to go, but never to return.O son, the night before thy wedding day.Hath Death lain with thy wife. There she lies…Death is my son-in-law, Death is my heir…” (Act IV, scene v)
Paris “Beguiled, divorced, wronged, spited, slain!Most detestable Death, by thee beguiled,By cruel, cruel thee quite overthrown.O love! O life!–not life, but love in death!” (Act IV, scene v)
Friar Lawrence “…She’s not well married that lives married long,But she’s best married that dies married young…” (Act IV, scene v)
Lord Capulet “All things that we ordained festivalTurn from their office to black funeral–Our instruments to melancholy bells,Our wedding cheer to a sad burial feast,Our solemn hymns to sullen dirges change,Our bridal flowers serve for a buried corse,And all things change them to the contrary.” (Act IV, scene v)
Romeo “…I dreamt my lady came and found me dead(Strange dream that gives a dead man leave to think!)And breathed such life with kisses in my lipsThat I revived and was an emperor.Ah me! How sweet is love itself possessed.When but love’s shadows are so rich in joy!” (Act V, scene i)
Balthasar “Then she is well and nothing can be ill.Her body sleeps in Capels’ monument,And her immortal part with angels lives…” (Act V, scene i)
Balthasar “I do beseech you, sir, have patience.Your looks are pale and wild and do importSome misadventure.” (Act V, scene i)
Romeo “The world is not thy friend, nor the world’s law.The world affords no law to make thee rich.Then be not poor, but break it, and take this.” (Act V, scene i)
Apothecary “My poverty, but not my will, consents.” (Act V, scene i)
Romeo “I pay thy poverty and not thy will.” (Act V, scene i)
Romeo “There is thy gold–worse poison to men’s souls,Doing more murder in this loathsome world,Than these poor compounds that thou mayst not sell…” (Act V, scene i)
Friar John “…Suspecting that we both were in a house Where the infectious pestilence did reign, Sealed up the doors, and would not let us forth, So that my speed to Mantua there was stayed.” (Act V, scene ii)
Friar Lawrence “Unhappy fortune! By my brotherhood,The letter was not nice [trivial] but full of charge,Of dear import, and the neglecting itMay do much danger. Friar John, go hence.Get me an iron crow and bring it straightUnto my cell.” (Act V, scene ii)
Friar Lawrence “…Within this three hours will fair Juliet wake.She will beshrew me much that RomeoHath had no notice of these accidents.But I will write again to Mantua,And keep her at my cell till Romeo come–Poor living corse, closed in a dead man’s tomb!” (Act V, scene ii)
Paris “Sweet flower, with flowers thy bridal bed I strew(O woe, thy canopy is dust and stones!) Which with sweet water nightly I will dew…” (Act V, scene iii)
Romeo “Why I descend into this bed of deathIs partly to behold my lady’s face,But chiefly to take thence from her dead fingerA precious ring–a ring that I must use In dear employment. Therefore hence, be gone…” (Act V, scene iii)
Balthasar “For all this same, I’ll hide me hereabout.His looks I fear, and his intents I doubt.” (Act V, scene iii)
Romeo “Thou detestable maw, thou womb of death,Gorged with the dearest morsel of the earth,Thus I enforce thy rotten jaws to open,And in despite I’ll cram thee with more food.” (Act V, scene iii)
Paris “This is that banished haughty MontagueThat murd’red my love’s cousin–with which griefIt is supposed the fair creature died–And here is come to do some villainous shameTo the dead bodies. I will apprehend him…” (Act V, scene iii)
Romeo “Good gentle youth, tempt not a desp’rate man.Fly hence and leave me… …I beseech thee, youth,Put not another sin upon my headBy urging me to fury. O, be gone!” (Act V, scene iii)
Paris “O, I am slain! If thou be merciful, Open the tomb, lay me with Juliet.” (Act V, scene iii)
Romeo “…O give me thy hand,One writ with me in sour misfortune’s book!I’ll bury thee in a triumphant grave.” (Act V, scene iii)
Romeo “Death, that hath sucked the honey of thy breath,Hath had no power yet upon thy beauty,Thou art not conquered. Beauty’s ensign yetIs crimson in thy lips and in thy cheeks,And death’s pale flag is not advanced there.” (Act V, scene iii)
Romeo “…Why are thou yet so fair? Shall I believeThat unsubstantial Death is amorous,And that the lean abhorred monster keepsThee here in dark to be his paramour?” (Act V, scene iii)
Romeo “Here’s to my love. [Drinking.] O true apothecary,Thy drugs are quick. Thus with a kiss I die.” (Act V, scene iii)
Friar Lawrence “…What torch is youn that vainly lends his lightTo grubs and eyeless skulls? As I discern,It burneth in the Capels’ monument.” (Act V, scene iii)
Balthasar “As I did sleep under this yew tree here,I dreamt my master and another fought,And that my master slew him.” (Act V, scene iii)
Friar Lawrence “I hear a noise. Lady, come from that nestOf death, contagion, and unnatural sleep.A greater power than we can contradictHath thwarted out intents. Come, come away…” (Act V, scene iii)
Friar Lawrence “…Come, I’ll dispose of thee Among a sisterhood of holy nuns. Stay not to question, for the watch is coming. Come, go, good Juliet. I dare no longer stay.” (Act V, scene iii)
Juliet “Poison, I see, hath been his timeless end,O churl! Drunk all, and left no friendly dropTo help me after? I will kiss thy lips.Haply some poison yet doth hang on themTo make me die with a restorative [medicine]Thy lips are warm!” (Act V, scene iii)
Juliet “Yea, noise? Then I’ll be brief. O, happy dagger!This is thy sheath; there rust, and let me die.” (Act V, scene iii)
Prince Escalus “Search, seek, and know how this foul murder comes.” (Act V, scene iii)
Lady Capulet “O, the people in the street cry, ‘Romeo,’Some ‘Juliet,’ and some ‘Paris’; and all runWith open outcry toward our monument.” (Act V, scene iii)
Lord Montague “Alas, my liege, my wife is dead tonight!Grief of my son’s exile hath stopped her breath.What further woe conspires against mine age?” (Act V, scene iii)
Lord Montague “O thou untaught! What manners is in this,To press before thy father to a grave?” (Act V, scene iii)
Friar Lawrence “I am the greatest, able to do the least,Yet most suspected, as the time and placeDoth make against me, or this direful murder.And here I stand, both to impeach and purgeMyself condemned and myself excused.” (Act V, scene iii)
Prince Escalus “We still have known thee for a holy man…” (Act V, scene iii)
Prince Escalus “This letter doth make good the friar’s words,Their course of love, the tidings of her death…” (Act V, scene iii)
Prince Escalus “Where be these enemies? Capulet, Montague,See what a scourge is laid upon your hate,That heaven finds means to kill your joys with love.And I, for wrinkling at your discords too,Have lost a brace [pair] of kinsmen. All are punished.” (Act V, scene iii)
Lord Capulet “O brother Montague, give me thy hand.This is my daughter’s jointure, for no moreCan I demand.” (Act V, scene iii)
Lord Montague “But I can give thee more; For I will raise her statue in pure gold.That whiles Verona by that name is known,There shall no figure at such rate [value] be setAs that of true and faithful Juliet.” (Act V, scene iii)
Lord Capulet “As rich shall Romeo’s by his lady’s lie–Poor sacrifices of our enmity!” (Act V, scene iii)
Prince Escalus “A glooming peace this morning with it brings.The sun for sorrow will not show his head.Go hence to have more talk of these sad things;Some shall be pardoned, and some punished;For never was a story of more woeThan this of Juliet and her Romeo.” (Act V, scene iii)
The day is hot, the Capels are abroad, and if we meet we shall not ‘scape a brawl, for now, these hot days, is the mad blood stirring Benvolio
By my heel, I care not Mercutio HE BASICALLY SAYS I DONT CARE WHEN THE CAPULETS AND TYBALT COME) (I DONT CARE WHAT YU THINK AS LONG AS ITS NOT ABOUT ME)
Mercutio, thou consortest with Romeo Tybalt
No better term than this: thou art a villain Tybalt
Tybalt, the reason that I have to love thee doth must excuse the appertaining rage to such a greeting Romeo I LOVE U U LOVE ME LETS GET TOGETHER NOT KILL ANYONE??? pLS
Villain I am none. Therefore farewell. I see thou knowest me not. Romeo
Boy, this shall not excuse the injuries that thou hast done me. Therefore turn and draw. Tybalt TYBALT TELLS ROMEO THAT HIS WORDS CANT EXCUSE THE HARM HE’S DONE HIM, SO FIGHT ME (fight me bro)
I do protest I never injured thee but love thee better that thou canst devise till thou shalt know the reason of my love. Romeo
And so good Capulet, which name I tender as dearly as mine own, be satisfied Romeo
This gentleman, the Prince’s near ally, my very friend, hath got this mortal hurt in my behalf.My reputation stained with Tybalt’s slander- Tybalt that an hour hath been my cousin! Romeo
O sweet Juliet, thy beauty hath made me effeminate and in my temper softened valor’s steel. Romeo
This day’s black fate on more days doth depend. this but begins the woe others must end. Romeo
Alive in triumph, and Mercutio slain! Away to heaven, respective lenity, a fire-eyed fury be my conduct now. Now, Tybalt, take the “villain” back again that late thou gavest me, of Mercutio’s soul is but a little way above our heads staying for thine to keep him company. Romeo
Either thou or I, or both, must go with him Romeo ROMEO TELLS TYBALT THAT EITHER TYBLAT, HIMSELF, OR THE BOTH OF THEM IS GOING TO ACCOMPANY MERCUTIO IN HEAVEN. (if we burn YOU BURN WITH US)
O, I am fortune’s fool! Romeo
For blood of ours shed blood of Montague Lady Capulet
He is a kinsman to the Montague. Affection makes him false; he speaks not true Lady Capulet
Romeo slew Tybalt; Romeo must not live. Lady Capulet
And for that offense immediately we do exile him hence Prince
I have an interest in your hearts’ proceeding: my blood for your rude brawls doth lie a-bleeding. But I’ll amerce you with so strong a fine that you shall all repent the loss of mine. I will be deaf to pleading and excuses. Prince MERCUTIO, A RELATIVE OF THE PRINCE, LIES DEAD BC OF THIS FAMILY FEUD (THE PRINCE BASICALLY SAID “YOU MAKE ME SICK EUFJS”
Nor tears nor prayers shall purchase out abuses. Therefore use none. Let Romeo hence in hast, else, when he is found, that hour is his last. Prince
Bear hence this body and attend our will. Mercy, but murderers, pardoning those that kill. Prince
Ah, weraday, he’s dead, he’s dead, he’s dead! We are undone, lady, we are undone. Alack the day, he’s gone, he’s killed he’s dead. Nurse
O, that deceit should dwell in such a gorgeous place Juliet JULIET SAYS SHE CANT BELIEVE SOMETHING SO EVIL WAS INSIDE SOMETHING SO BEAUTIFUL (no ordinary love amirite)
Blistered by thy tongue for such a wish! Juliet THE NURSE SHAMES ROMEO AND JULIET SAYS SHE HOPES BLISTERS COVERS THE NURSES TONGUE FOR SAYING THAT (bite my tongue)
Poor ropes, you are beguiled, both you and I, for Romeo is exiled. Juliet I GUESS YOU COULD SAY ROMEO AND JULIET ARE MILES AWAY ba dum tss
He made you for a highway to my bed, but I, a maid, die maiden-widowed. Come, cords- come, Nurse. I’ll to my wedding bed, and death, not Romeo, take my maidenhead! Juliet
Romeo, come forth; come forth, thou fearful man. Affliction in enamored of the parts, and thou are wedded to calamity. Friar Lawrence FRIAR TELLS ROMEO TO COME OUT AND CHILL THE F OUT (ooHHHHhh calamity)
A gentler judgment vanished form his lips: not body’s death, but body’s banishment Friar Lawrence FRIAR TELLING ROMEO U WONT DIE BUT ULL BE BANISHED DUN DUN DUNNNNN romeo’s in murder city amirite or am I RIGHT
Then “banished” is death mistermed. Calling death “banished” thou cutt’st my head off with a golden axe and smilest upon the stroke that murders me. Romeo
Thy noble shape is but a form of wax, digressing from the valor of a man; thy dear love sworn by holy perjury, killing that love which thou hast vowed to cherish (pg. 149 & 151) Friar Lawrence FRIAR GIVES ROMEO A WHOLE SPEECH ON WHY NOT TO KILL HIMSELF never giving up huh (bmth)
In all respects by me. Nay, more, I doubt it not- Capulet
O’ Thursday, tell her, she shall be married to this noble earl Capulet
Tybalt being slain so late, it may be thought we held him carelessly, being our kinsman, if we revel much Capulet CAPULET TALKING ABOUT TYBALT AND THE WEDDING AND HOW HE DIED AND STUFFF thnks fr th npt cplt
More light and light more dark and dark our woes Romeo ITS MORNING AND THERES MORE PAIN (emo af + uR HOT n UR COLD)
O’ thinks’st thou we shall ever meet again? Juliet JULIET ASKS ROMEO IF THEY’LL EVER MEET AGAIN. (if you love something, set it free)
I doubt it not; and all these woes shall serve for sweet discourses in our times to come Romeo JULIET IS WORRIED ABOUT ROMEO LEAVING VERONA SO ROMEO SAYS THIS WILL JUST GIVE THEM STORIES TO TELL EACHOTHER LATER IN LIFE BUT JULIET IS STILL WORRIED (I hate this town, it’s so washed up…)
O fortune, fortune, all men call thee fickle. If thou art fickle, what dost thou with him that is renowned for faith? Juliet JULIET SAYS EVERYONE SAYS YOU CANT MAKE UP YOUR MIND WHAT ARE YOU GOING TO DO TO ROMEO, WHO’S SO FAITHFUL. (have faith in me)
Be fickle, fortune, for then I hope thou wilt not keep him long, but send him back. Juliet
Evermore weeping for your cousins death? What, wilt thou wash him from his grave with tears? Lady Capulet
An if thou couldst, thou couldst not make him live. Therefor have done. Some grief shows much of love, but much of grief shows still some want of wit Lady Capulet JULEITS MOM BASICALLY TOLD HER TO STOP CRYING OVER TYBALTS DEATH AND STUFF GOsh JULIET LET LIVE A BIT
Feeling so the loss, I cannot choose but ever weep the friends Juliet
Villain and he be many miles asunder. God pardon him. I do with all my heart, and yet no man like he doth grieve my heart. Juliet JULIET TELLS THE NURSE TO PARDON ROMEO (the drug in me is romeo)
Ay, madam, from the reach of these my hands. Would none but I might avenge my cousin’s death Juliet
Now, by Saint Peter’s church, and Peter too, he shall not make me there a joyful bride! I wonder at this haste, that I must wed ere he that should be husband comes to woo. Juliet
I pray you, tell my lord and father, madam, I will not marry yet, and when I do I swear it shall be Romeo, whom you know I hate, rather than Paris. These are new indeed! Juliet
I would the fool were married to her grave Lady Capulet LADY CAPULET TELLS CAPULET THAT JULIET REFUSES TO GET MARRIED (so am I still waiting for juliet to get married)
Not proud you have, but thankful that you have. Proud can I never be of what I hate, but thankful even for hate that is meant love Juliet
Or, if you do not, make the bridal bed in that dim monument where Tybalt lies. Juliet
Talk not to me, for I’ll not speak a word. Do as thou wilt, for I have done with thee. Lady Capulet
Alack, alack, that heaven should practice stratagems upon so soft a subject as myself Juliet JULIET IS UPSET ABOUT THE WHOLE ROMEO SITCH SO SHE ASKS THE NURSE WHY THE HEAVENS ARE PLAYING TRICKS ON HER. (hell above)
Then, since the case so stands as now it doth, i think is best you married with the County. O, he’s such a lovely gentleman Nurse
beshrew my very heart, I think you are happy in this second match, for it excels your first, or, if it did not, your first is dead, or ‘twerp as good he were as living here and you no use of him. Nurse
Well, thou hast comforted me marvelous much. Go in and tell my lady I am gone, having displeased my father, to Lawrence’ cell to make confession and to be absolved. Juliet
Ancient damnation, O most wicked fiend! Is it more sin to wish thus forsworn or to dispraise my lord with that same tongue which she hath praised hi with above compare so many thousand times? Juliet JULIET DOESNT WANNA BREAK A SIN BY AMRRYING PARIS AND CURSES THE NURSE BC SHE PRAISED ROMEO AND NOW SHE SHAMED HIM AND OH nO (would you still be there nurse? nOOOOOO)
Thou and y bosom henceforth shall be twain. I’ll to the Friar to know his remedy. If all else fail, myself have power to die. Juliet
go home, be merry, give consent to marry Paris Friar Lawrence
O, bid me leap, rather than marry Paris, from the bafflements of any tower Juliet
Love give me strength and strength shall help afford Juliet
Henceforth I am ever ruled by you Juliet
Send for the county. Go tell him of this. Ill have this knit knot up tomorrow morning Capulet
My heart is wondrous light since this same wayward girl was so reclaimed Capulet
What if this mixture do not work at all? Shall I be married tomorrow morning? Juliet
Romeo. Romeo. Romeo! Here’s drink. I drink to thee Juliet
Madam, ay let the County take you in your bed Nurse
My child, My only life. Revive, look up or I will die with thee Lady Capulet
Death lies on her like an untimely frost upon the sweetest flower in the field Capulet
Death is my son in law, death is my heir Capulet
Beguiled, divorced, wronged, spited, slain, most detestable death Paris
Your part in her you could not keep from death Friar Lawrence
Shes not well married that lives married long Friar Lawrence
I dreamt my lady came and found me dead and breathed such life with kisses in my lips Romeo
For nothing can be ill if she is well Romeo
Her body sleeps in the Capel’s monument Balthasar
is it e’en so?- then I defy you stars! Romeo
Well Juliet I will lie with thee tonight Romeo
This world is not thy friend, nor the world’s law Romeo
There is thy gold, worse poison to men’s souls, doing more murder in this loathsome world than these poor compunds that thou mayst not sell me Romeo
I sell thee poison, thou hast sole me none Romeo
nightly shall be to strew thy grave (with flowers) and weep Paris
Can vengeance be pursued further than death? Paris
Obey and go with me for thou must die Paris
I must indeed and therefore I cam hither Romeo
tempt not a desp’rate man Romeo
open the tomb, lay me with juliet Paris
shall I beleive that unsubstantial death is amorous Romeo
shake the yoke of inauspicious stars from this world-wearied flesh! Romeo
the doors of breath, sealed with a righteous kiss Romeo
I will kiss they lips, Haply some poison doth hang on them Juliet
O happy dagger, thus is my sheath. There rust and let me die Juliet
Alas, my liege, my wife is dead tonight Montague
I am the greatest, yet able to do least Friar Lawrence
see what a scourge is laid upon your hate Prince
O brother Montague give me thy hand. This is my daughters venture, no more can I demand. Capulet
For I will ray her statue in pure gold… There shall no figure be set as that of true and faithful Juliet Montague
As rich shall Romeo’s by his lady lie, poor sacrifices for our emnity Capulet
A glooming peace this morning with it brings. The sun for sorrow will not show it’s head Prince
For never was a story pf more woe, than this of Juliet and her Romeo Prince
Where are the vile beginners of this fray? Prince
A plague O both your houses! they have made worms meat of me Mercutio
Either thou or I, or both must keep him company Romeo
I was hurt under your arm Mercutio
And so, good capulet, whose name I tender as dearly as mine own, be satisfied Romeo
By my head here come the Capulets Benvolio
By my heel I care not Mercutio
the sweetest honey is loathsome in it’s own deliciousness Friar Lawrence
Oh wilt thou leave me so unsatisfied? Romeo
Oh swear not by the moon, th’ inconstant moon Juliet
What’s Montague? it is nor hand nor foot Juliet
He jests at scars that never felt a wound Romeo
But passion lends them power, time means to meet chorus
My only love sprung from my only hate Juliet
Tis he that villain Romeo Tybalt
the all seeing sun ne’er seen her match since first the world began Romeo
My will to her consent is but a part Capulet
Here’s much to do with hate and less with love Romeo
(Peace).. I hate the word as I hate hell, all Montagues, and thee Tybalt
turn thee, Benvolio, look at thy death Tybalt
Part fools, put up your swords for you know not what you do Benvolio
There on the ground with his own tears made drunk Friar Lawrence
This is a dear mercy and thou seest it not Friar Lawrence
Ha Banishment! be merciful and say death Romeo
My husband lives, That Tybalt would have slain, and Tybalts dead, that would have slain my Romeo Juliet
and for that offense, immediately we do exile him hence Prince
These violent delights have violent ends Friar Lawrence
Arise fair sun and kill the envious moon Romeo
if love be blind, love cannot hit the mark Mercutio
O, then I see Queen Mab hath been with you Mercutio
Alas, that love, whose view is muffled still Benvolio
I’ll look to like if looking liking move, but no deeper will I endart my eye Juliet
These times of woe shall afford no time to woo Paris
Immoderately she weeps for Tybalt’s death,And therefore have I little talked of love,For Venus smiles not in a house of tears.Now, sir, her father counts it dangerousThat she do give her sorrow so much sway,And in his wisdom hastes our marriageTo stop the inundation of her tears— Count Paris
O, shut the door! And when thou hast done so,Come weep with me, past hope, past cure, past help. Juliet
If, rather than to marry County Paris,Thou hast the strength of will to slay thyself,Then is it likely thou wilt undertakeA thing like death to chide away this shame,That copest with death himself to ‘scape from it. Friar Lawrence
Go home, be merry. Give consentTo marry Paris. Wednesday is tomorrow.Tomorrow night look that thou lie alone.Let not the Nurse lie with thee in thy chamber. Friar Lawrence
..I have learned me to repent the sinOf disobedient oppositionTo you and your behests, and am enjoinedBy holy Laurence to fall prostrate hereTo beg your pardon. Juliet
Send for the county. Go tell him of this.I’ll have this knot knit up tomorrow morning. Lord Capulet
I have a faint cold fear thrills through my veinsThat almost freezes up the heat of life. Juliet
Alack, alack, is it not like that I,So early waking, what with loathsome smells,And shrieks like mandrakes torn out of the earth,That living mortals, hearing them, run mad—? Juliet
Oh, look! Methinks I see my cousin’s ghostSeeking out Romeo, that did spit his bodyUpon a rapier’s point. Stay, Tybalt, stay!Romeo, Romeo, Romeo! Here’s drink. I drink to thee. Juliet
Go waken Juliet. Go and trim her up.I’ll go and chat with Paris. Hie, make haste,Make haste. The bridegroom he is come already.Make haste, I say. Lord Capulet
Death lies on her like an untimely frostUpon the sweetest flower of all the field. Lord Capulet
The most you sought was her promotion,For ’twas your heaven she should be advanced.And weep ye now, seeing she is advancedAbove the clouds, as high as heaven itself? Friar Lawrence
If I may trust the flattering truth of sleep,My dreams presage some joyful news at hand.My bosom’s lord sits lightly in his throne,And all this day an unaccustomed spiritLifts me above the ground with cheerful thoughts. Romeo
…nothing can be ill.Her body sleeps in Capels’ monument,And her immortal part with angels lives.I saw her laid low in her kindred’s vaultAnd presently took post to tell it you. Balthasar
Is it e’en so? Then I defy you, stars!Thou know’st my lodging. Get me ink and paper,And hire post horses. I will hence tonight Romeo
Well, Juliet, I will lie with thee tonight.Let’s see for means. O mischief, thou art swiftTo enter in the thoughts of desperate men!I do remember an apothecary—And hereabouts he dwells… Romeo
Such mortal drugs I have, but Mantua’s lawIs death to any he that utters them. Apothecary
Put this in any liquid thing you willAnd drink it off; and, if you had the strengthOf twenty men, it would dispatch you straight. Apothecary
Going to find a barefoot brother out,One of our order, to associate me,Here in this city visiting the sick,And finding him, the searchers of the town,Suspecting that we both were in a houseWhere the infectious pestilence did reign,Sealed up the doors and would not let us forth.So that my speed to Mantua there was stayed. Friar John
Sweet flower, with flowers thy bridal bed I strew—O woe! Thy canopy is dust and stones—Which with sweet water nightly I will dew.Or, wanting that, with tears distilled by moans,The obsequies that I for thee will keepNightly shall be to strew thy grave and weep. Count Paris
Therefore hence, be gone.But if thou, jealous, dost return to pryIn what I farther shall intend to do,By heaven, I will tear thee joint by jointAnd strew this hungry churchyard with thy limbs.The time and my intents are savage, wild,More fierce and more inexorable farThan empty tigers or the roaring sea. Romeo
Stop thy unhallowed toil, vile Montague!Can vengeance be pursued further than death?Condemnèd villain, I do apprehend thee.Obey and go with me, for thou must die. Count Paris
By heaven, I love thee better than myself,For I come hither armed against myself.Stay not, be gone. Live, and hereafter sayA madman’s mercy bid thee run away. Romeo
Oh, I am slain! If thou be merciful,Open the tomb. Lay me with Juliet. Count Paris
O true apothecary,Thy drugs are quick. Thus with a kiss I die. Romeo
O comfortable Friar! Where is my lord?I do remember well where I should be,And there I am. Where is my Romeo? Juliet
O happy dagger,This is thy sheath. There rust and let me die. Juliet
Alas, my liege, my wife is dead tonight.Grief of my son’s exile hath stopped her breath.What further woe conspires against mine age? Lord Montague
See what a scourge is laid upon your hate,That heaven finds means to kill your joys with love!And I, for winking at your discords, tooHave lost a brace of kinsmen. All are punished. Prince Escalus
For I will raise her statue in pure gold,That whiles Verona by that name is known,There shall no figure at such rate be setAs that of true and faithful Juliet. Lord Montague
A glooming peace this morning with it brings.The sun, for sorrow, will not show his head.Go hence, to have more talk of these sad things.Some shall be pardoned, and some punishèd.For never was a story of more woeThan this of Juliet and her Romeo. Prince Escalus
A plague o’ both your houses! Mercutio
Hold then, go home, be merry, give consent To marry Paris. Wednesday is tomorrow; Tomorrow night look that you you lie alone, … Friar Lawrence to Juliet
If I do so, it will be of more price, Being spoke behind your back, than to your face. Juliet to Paris
Where I have learnt me to repent the sin Of disobedient opposition To you and your behests, and am enjoin’d By holy Lawrence to fall prostrate here To beg your pardon. Juliet to Capulet
Tell me not, Friar, that thou hearest of this, Unless thou tell me how I may prevent it. Juliet to Friar
What if it be a poison which the Friar Subtly hath minister’d to have me dead… Juliet to self
Come, stir, stir, stir! the second cock hath crow’d, The curfew bell hath rung, ’tis three a’clock. look to the bak’d meats, good Angelica, Spare not for cost. Capulet to Nurse
Alas, alas! Help, help! my lady’s dead!… Nurse to Self
O me, O me, my child, my only life! revive, look up, or I will die with thee. Lady Capulet to dead Juliet
Peace ho, for shame! Confusion’s cure lives not In these confusions. Heaven and yourself Had part in this fair maid, now heaven hath all, … Friar Lawrence to Capulet, Lady Capulet, and Paris
Ay, those attires are best, but, gentle nurse, I pray thee leave me to myself tonight. Juliet to Nurse
Romeo, Romeo, Romeo! Here’s drink- O drink to thee. Juliet to self
the heaven de low’r upon you for some ill; Move them no more by crossing their high will. Friar Lawrence to Capulet, Lady Capulet and Nurse
if I may trust the flattering truth of sleep, My dreams presage some joyful news at hand… Romeo to self
Then she is well and nothing can be ill: Her body sleeps in Capel’s monument, And her immortal part where the angels lives. Balthasar to Romeo
There is thy gold, worse poison to men’s souls, Doing more murder in this loathsome world, Than these poor compounds that thou mayst not sell. Romeo to Apothecary
Beguil’d, divorced, wronged, spited, slain! Most detestable death, by thee beguil’d, By cruel, cruel thee quite overthrown! Oh love! Oh life! not life, but love in death. Paris to Nurse, Capulet, and Lady Capulet
well, Juliet, I will lie with thee tonight. Let’s see for means. Romeo to self
so shall no foot upon the churchyard tread, Being loose, unfirm with digging up of graves, But thou shalt hear it. Paris to Page
sweet flower, with flowers thy bridal bed I strew- O woe, thy canopy is dust and stones!- Paris to self
I must indeed, and therefore came I hither. Good gentle youth, tempt not a desp’rate man, Fly hence and leave me. Romeo to Paris
How oft when men are at the point of death Have they been marry, which their keepers call A light’ning before death! O how may I Call this a light’ning? Oh my love, my wife… Romeo to self
Oh happy dagger, This is thy sheath; there rust, and let me die. Juliet to self
A dateless bargain to engrossing Death! Come, bitter conduct, come unsavoury guide! Thou desperate pilot, now at once run on The dashing rocks thy seasick weary bark! Here’s to my love! O true apothecary! Thy drugs are quick. Thus with a kiss I die. Romeo to self
O’ the people in the street cry ‘Romeo,’ some ‘Juliet,’ and some ‘Paris,’ and all run With open outcry toward our monument. Lady Capulet to Prince
I will be brief, for my short date of breath Is not so long as is a tedious tale. Romeo, there dead, was husband to that Juliet, And she, there dead, that Romeo’s faithful wife… Friar Lawrence to Prince
O brother Montague, give me thy hand. This is my daughter’s jointure, for no more Can I demand. Capulet to Montague
There shall no figure at such rate be set As that of true and faithful Juliet. Montague to Capulet
A glooming peace this morning with it brings, The sun for sorrow will not show his head. Go hence to have more talk of these sad things; Some shall be pardon’d, and some punished: For never was a story of more woe Than this of Juliet and her Romeo. Prince to all
Entire prologue Chorus
Is the law of our side if I say “Ay”? Sampson
Part fools! Put up your swords. You know not what to do. Benvolio
What, art thou drawn among these heartless hinds? TUrn thee Benvolio; look upon thy death Tybalt
I do but keep the peace. Put up thy sword, or manage it to part these men with me. Benvolio
What, drawn and talk of peace? I hate the work as I hate hell, all Montague’s, and thee. Have at thee, coward! Tybalt
On pain of torture, from those bloody bands throw your mistempered weapons to the ground (pg. 15) Prince
If ever you disturb our streets again, your lives shall pay the forfeit of the peace. Prince
Madam, an hour before the worshipped sun peered froth the golden window of the east Benvolio
Away from light steals home my heavy son Montague
Out of her favor where I am in love Romeo
Alas that love, whose view is muffled still, should without eyes see pathways to his will Romeo
Here’s so much to do with hate, but more with love Romeo
Be ruled by me. Forget to think of her. Benvolio
By giving liberty upon thine eyes. Examine other beauties. Benvolio
He that is stricken blind cannot forget the precious treasure of his eyesight lost Romeo
Let two roe summers wither in their pride ere we may think her ripe to be a bride. Capulet
Earth hath swallowed all my hopes but she Capulet
But woo her, gentle paris, get her heart; my will to her consent is but a part. And, she agreed, within her scope of choice lies my consent and fair according voice. Capulet
Hear all, all see, and like her most whose merit most shall be; which on more view of many, mine, being one, may stand in number, though in reck’ning none. Capulet
and if you be not of the house of Montague’s, I pray come and crush a cup of wine. Rest you merry. Servingman
Compare her face with some that I shall show, and I will make thee think thy swan a crow. (pg. 33) Benvolio
I have remembered me, thou’s hear our counsel. Thou knowest my daughter’s of a pretty age. Lady Capulet
It is and [honor] that I dream not of Juliet
Well, think of marriage now. younger than you here in Verona, ladies of esteem are made already mother. Lady Capulet
I’ll look to like, if looking liking move. But no more deep will I endart my eye than your consent gives strength to make [it] fly. Juliet
Give me a torch. I am not for this ambling, being but heavy I will bear the light. Romeo
An we mean well in going to this masque, but ’tis no wit to go.I dreamt a dream tonight. Romeo
That dreamers often lieIn bed asleep while they do dream things true. MercutioRomeo
I fear too early, for my mind misgives some consequence yet having in the stars shall bitterly begin his fearful date with this night’s revels and expire the term of a despised life closed in my breast by some vile forfeit of untimely death but that he hath the steerage of my course direct my [sail]. Romeo
O, she doth teach the torches to burn bright! Romeo
So shows a snowy dove trooping with crows as vonder lady o’er her fellows shows Romeo
Did my heart love till now? Forswear it, sight, for i ne’er saw true beauty till this night Romeo
This, by his voice, should be a Montague- Tybalt
Now, by the stock and honor of my kin, to strike him dead I hold it not a sin. Tybalt
’tis he, that villain Romeo. Tybalt
ANd,t o say truth, Verona brags of him to be a virtuous and well-governed youth (pg. 55) Capulet
I will withdraw, but this intrusion shall, now seeming sweet, convert to bitt’rest gall. Tybalt
Is she a Capulet? O dear account! My life is my foe’s debt. Romeo
IF he be married, my grave is like to be my wedding bed. Juliet
My only love sprung from my only hate! Too early seen unknown, and known too late! Juliet
Then move not while my prayer’s effect I take Romeo
You kiss by th’ book Juliet
Madam, your mother craves a word with you Nurse
All of page 65 Chorus
He jests at scars that never felt a wound Romeo
It is the East, and Juliet is the sun Romeo
O Romeo, Romeo, wherefore art thou Romeo? Deny thy father and refuse they name, or, if thou wilt not, be but sworn my love, and i’ll no longer be a Capulet Juliet
That which we call a rose by any other word would smell as sweet Juliet
Romeo, doff thy name and, for thy name, which is no part of thee, take all myself Juliet
With love’s light wings did I o-erperch these walls, for stony limits cannot hold love out, and what love can do, that dares me attempt. Therefore thy kinsmen are no stop to me. Romeo
Thou knowest the mask of night is on my face, else would a maiden blush repaint my cheek for that which thou hast heard me speak tonight. Juliet
At lover’s perjuries, they say Jove laughs Juliet
Or if thou thinkest I am too quickly won, I’ll frown and be perverse and say thee nay, so thou wilt woo, but else not for the world. (beginning of pg. 77) Juliet
Lady, by yonder blessed moon I vow, that tips with silver all these fruit-tree tops Romeo
Although I joy in thee, I have no joy of this contract tonight, It is too rash, too unadvised, too sudden, too like the lighting which doth cease to be ere one can say “It lightens.” Sweet, good night. This bud of love, by summer’s ripening breath, may prove a beauteous flower when next we meet. Juliet
My bounty is as boundless as the sea, my love as deep Juliet
O blessed, blessed night! I am afraid, being in night, all this is but a dream, too flattering sweet to be substantial Romeo
pg. 79, paragraph 6; proposal of marriage for later that day Juliet
Love goes towards love as schoolboys from their books Romeo
But love from love, toward school with heavy looks Romeo
Parting is such sweet sorrow that I shall say “Good night” till it be morrow Juliet
The earth thats nature’s mother is her tomb; what is her burying grave that is her womb Friar Lawrence
Virtue itself turn vice, being misapplied, and vice sometime by action dignified Friar Lawrence
Two such opposed king encamp them still in man as well as herbs- grace and rude will Friar Lawrence
Or, if not so, then here I hit it right: our Romeo hath not been in bed tonight Friar Lawrence
I have forgot that name that name’s woe Romeo
Be plain, good son, and homely in thy drift. Riddling confession find but riddling shrift Friar Lawrence
Then plainly know my heart’s dear love is set on the fair daughter of rich Capulet. As mine on hers, so hers is set on mine, and all combined, save what thou must combine by holy marriage. WHen and where and how we met, we wooed, and made exchange of vow I’ll tell thee as we pass, but this I pray, that thou consent to marry us today. Romeo
Holy Saint Francis, what a change is here! (pg. 89 paragraph 1) Friar Lawrence
Her I love now doth grace for grace and love for love allow Romeo
O, she knew well they did read by rote that could not spell. But come, young waverer, come, go with me. In one respect I’ll thy assistant be, for this alliance may so happy prove to turn your households’ rancor to pure love. Friar Lawrence
Tybalt, the kinsman to old capulet, hath sent a letter to his father’s house Benvolio
This afternoon, sir? Well, she shall be there Nurse
Pg. 105 paragraph 1 Juliet
Pg. 109, paragraph 4 about the awaiting Romeo in Friar Lawrence’s cell waiting to be married Nurse
So smille the heavens upon this holy act that after-hours with sorrow chide not us Friar Lawrence
These violent delight have violent ends and in their triumph die, like fire and powder, which as they kiss, consume. THe sweetest honey is loathsome in his own deliciousness and in the taste confounds the appetite. Therefore love moderately. Long love doth so. Too swift arrives as tardy as too slow. Friar Lawrence
Come, come with me, and we will make short work, for, by your leaves, you shall not stay alone till Holy Church incorporate two in one Friar Lawrence
Part Fools! Put up your swords. You know not what you do. Benvolio
What, drawn and talk of peace? I hate the word as I hate hell, all Montagues and thee. Have at thee, coward! Tybalt
Rebellious subjects, enemies to peace… Three civil brawls bred of an airy word By thee, old Capulet and Montague… If you ever disturb our streets again YOur lives shall pay the forfeit of the peace. Prince
Madam, an hour before the worshiped sun, peered forth the golden window of the east. A troubled mind drove me to walk abroad that westward rooteth….SO early walking did i see your son. Towards him I made, but we has ‘ware of me and stole into the covert of the wood… And gladly shunned who gladly fled from me. Benvolio
Not having that, which, having, makes them short. Romeo
O brawling love, O loving hate. O anything of nothing first create! O heavy lightness, serious vanity. Misshapen chaos of seeming forms. Feather of lead, bright smoke, cold fire, sick health… Romeo
Tut, I have lost myself. I am not here. This is not Romeo. He’s some other where. Romeo
O, teach me how I should forget to think! Romeo
By giving liberty unto thine eyes. Examine other beauties. Benvolio
Oh honorable reckoning are you both, and pity ’tis you lived at odds so long. But now, my lord, what say you to my suit? Paris
My child is yet a stranger in the world. She hath not seen the change of fourteen years. Let two more summers wither in their pride. Ere we may think her ripe to be a bride. Lord Capulet
BUt woo her, gentle Paris, get her heart; My will to her consent is but a part. Lord Capulet
Find out whose names are written here! It is written that the shoemaker should meddle with his yard and the tailor with his last… But i am sent to find those persons whose names are here writ, and can never find what names the writing person hath here writ… Servingman
My master is the great rich Capulet, and, if you not be of the house of Montagues, I pray come and crush a cup of wine. Rest you merry. Servingman
Marry, that “marry” is the very theme I came to talk of…Tell me daughter Juliet, How stands your disposition to be married? Lady Capulet
It is an honor that I dream not of. Juliet
Go, girl, seek happy nights to happy days. Nurse
Not I, believe me. You have dancing shoes with nimble soles. I have a soul of lead so stakes me to the ground I cannot move. Romeo
O, then I see Queen Mab hath been with you…And in this state she gallops night by night through lovers’ brains and then they dream of love… Mercutio
I fear to early, for my mind misgives. Some consequence yet hanging in the stars Shall bitterly begin his fearful date…By some vile forfeit of untimely death. But he hath that steerage of my course. Direct my sail on, lusty gentlemen. Romeo
O, she doth teach the torches to burn bright!…As a rich jewel in an Ethiop’s ear…Did my heart love till now? Forswear it, sight, for I ne’er saw true beauty till this night. Romeo
This, by his voice, should be a Montague. Fetch me my rapier, boy. Now by the stock and honor of my kin, to strike him dead, I hold it not a sin. Tybalt
Uncle, this is a Montague, our foe…To scorn at our solemnity this night. Tybalt
If i profane with my unworthiest hand, this holy shrine. the gentle sin is this: My lips, two blushing pilgrims, ready stand to smooth that rough touch with a tender kiss. Romeo
THen move not while my prayer’s effect I take. Thus from my lips, by thine, my sin is purged. Romeo
Is she a Capulet? O dear account! My life is foe’s debt. Romeo
Go ask his name. If he be married, my grave is like to be my wedding bed. Juliet
My only love sprung from my only hate! Too early seen unknown, and known too late! Prodigious birth of love it is to me. That i must love a loathed enemy! Juliet
He jests at scars that never felt a wound. Romeo
O Romeo, Romeo, wherefore art thou Romeo? Deny thy farther and refuse thy name. Or, if thou wilt not, be but sworn my love, And I’ll no longer be a Capulet. Juliet
What’s in a name? That which we call a rose by any other word would smell as sweet. So Romeo would, were he not Romeo called. Without that title, Romeo doff thy name, and, for thy name, which is no part of thee, take all myself. Juliet
It is too rash, too unadvised, too sudden, too like the lightning, which doth cease to be…Come to thy heard as within my breast. Juliet
O, wilt thou leave me so unsatisfied? Romeo
Th’exchange of thy love’s faithful vow for mine. Romeo
Three words, dear Romeo, and goodnight indeed…Thy purpose marriage, send me word tomorrow. Where and what time thou wilt perform the right and all my fortunes at thy foot I’ll lay… Juliet
God pardon sin! Was thou with Rosaline? Friar Lawrence
Be plain, good son, and homely in thy drift. Ridding confession finds but riddling shrift. Friar Lawrence
Then plainly know my heart’s dear love is set on the fair daughter of rich Capulet…By holy marriage, when and where and how we met, we wooed, and made exchange of vow…That thou consent to marry us today. Romeo
Thy did read by wrote, that could not spell. But come, young waverer, come, go with me. For this alliance may so happy prove to turn your household’s rancor to pure love. Friar Lawrence
Wisely and slow. They stumble that run fast. Friar Lawrence
Bid her devise. Some means to come to shrift his afternoon, and there she shall, at Lawrence’s cell be shrived and married. Romeo
Romeo, the love i bear thee can afford. No better term than this, thou art a villain. Tybalt
I do protest I never injured thee. But love thee better than thou canst devise…And so, good Capulet which name I tender as dearly as mine own, be satisfied. Romeo
I beg for justice, which thou prince must give me. Romeo slew Tybalt, Romeo shall must not live. Lady Capulet
Immediately, we do exile him hence. Prince
Tybalt is one and Romeo is banished. Romeo that killed him-he is banished. Nurse
Marry, my child, early next Thursday morn. The gallant young and noble gentleman. The Country Paris, at Saint Peter’s Church, shall happily make thee there a joyful bride. Lady Capulet
I will not marry yet, and when I do I swear, it shall be Romeo, whom you know I hate rather than Paris. These are news indeed! Juliet
To have her matched. And having now provided a gentleman of noble parentage…graze where you will, you shall not house with me…An you be mine, I’ll give you to my friend, an you be not, hang, beg, starve, die in the streets, for by my soul I’ll ne’er acknowledge thee. Lord Capulet
O me! O me! My child, my only life. Revive, look up, or I will die with thee. Help, help! Call help! Lady Capulet
Take thou this vial, being then in bed and this distilling liquor drink thou off; No warmth, no breath shall testify thou livest, the roses in thy lips and cheeks shall fade…Thou shall continue two and forty hours and then awake as from a pleasant sleep. Friar Lawrence
Peace, ho, for shame! Confusion’s cure lives not in these confusions…Your part in her you could not keep from death, but heaven keeps his part in eternal life…Dry up your tears, and stick your rosemary on this fair corse, and as the custom is, bear her to church, for though nature bids us all lament, yet nature’s tears are reason’s merriment. Friar Lawrence
The boy gives warning something doth approach. What cursed foot wanders this way tonight, to cross my obsequies and true love’s right? What, with a torch? Muffle me, night, awhile. Paris
Give me that mattock and the wrenching iron. Hold, take this letter. Early in the morning see thou deliver it to my lord and father…Why i descend onto this bead of death is partly to behold my lady’s face…The time and my intents are savage-wildm more fierce and more inexorable far, than empty tigers or the roaring sea. Romeo
This is that banished haughty Montague that murdered my love’s cousin, with which grief it is supposed the fair creature died. And here comes to do some villainous shame to the dead bodies. I will apprehend him. Paris
O, I am slain! If thou be merciful, open the tomb; lay me with Juliet. Paris
O comfortable Friar, where is my lord? I do remember well where I should be, and there I am. Where is my Romeo? Juliet
I hear some noise-Lady, come from that nest of death and unnatural sleep…Thy husband in thy bosom there lies, and Paris too. Come, I’ll dispose of thee among a sisterhood of holy nuns, stay not to question for the watch is coming. Come, go, good Juliet. I dare no longer stay. Friar Lawrence
A glooming peace this morning with it brings. The sun for sorrow will not show his head. Go hence to have more talk of these sad things. Some shall be pardoned, and some punished. FOr never was a story of more woe than this of Juliet and her Romeo. Prince
Come hither, man. I see that thou art poor. Let me have a dram of poison, such soon speeding gear as will disperse itself through all the veins, that the life weary taker may fall dead. Art thou so bare and full of wretchedness…Famine is in thy cheeks, contempt and beggary hangs upon thy back. Romeo
Such mortal drugs I have, but Mantua’s law is death to any he that utters them. Apothecary
Put this in any liquid thing you will. And drink it off, and if you had the strength of twenty men, it would dispatch you straight. Apothecary

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