BSC Macbeth Key Quotes Act 4

“Double, double, toil and trouble. Fire burn and cauldron bubble.” Act 4 Scene 1The witches building suspense.
“I can tell that something wicked is coming by the tingling in my thumbs.” Act 4 Scene 1Second witch referring to Macbeth as ‘something wicked’. Themes/motifs: predictions; good vs evil; supernatural; appearance vs reality
“I don’t know how you know the things you do, but I insist you answer my questions…tell me what I want to know.” Act 4 Scene 1Macbeth deals with the witches in a very arrogant manner: despite his paranoia about his position he believes he is in control of the witches and so makes demands of them. Themes/motifs: predictions; good vs evil; supernatural; appearance vs reality
“Macbeth! Macbeth! Macbeth! Beware Macduff. Beware the thane of Fife. Let me go. Enough.” Act 4 Scene 1First apparition giving Macbeth a prophecy: Macduff is Thane of Fife.Themes/motifs: predictions; good vs evil; supernatural; appearance vs reality
“He will not be commanded by you. Here’s another. stronger than the first.” Act 4 Scene 1The first witch tells Macbeth he cannot control the witches.Themes/motifs: predictions; good vs evil; supernatural; appearance vs reality
“Be violent, bold, and firm. Laugh at the power of other men, because nobody born from a woman will ever harm Macbeth.” Act 4 Scene 1 This prophecies tricks Macbeth into feeling complacent that no one can hurt him. Themes/motifs: predictions; good vs evil; supernatural; appearance vs reality
“I’ll guarantee my own fate by having you killed, Macduff.” Act 4 Scene 1Macbeth announces his plan to murder Macduff; he is showing the audience how committed he is to his wicked plan. Despite the prophecy suggesting he is safe, he still wants to wipe out any potential threat. Themes/motifs: predictions; good vs evil; supernatural; appearance vs reality; ambition
“Macbeth will never be defeated until Birnam Wood marches to fight you at Dunsinane Hill.” Act 4 Scene 1The third apparition’s prophecy further reassures Macbeth that he is safe. Themes/motifs: predictions; good vs evil; supernatural; appearance vs reality
“Don’t try to find out more.” Act 4 Scene 1Macbeth thinks he is in control of the witches, but they are telling him what to do.Themes/motifs: predictions; good vs evil; supernatural; appearance vs reality
“You look too much like the ghost of Banquo. Go away!” Act 4 Scene 1Macbeth’s mental health is precarious and weak, which may be why the witches decide to play with him more. Themes/motifs: predictions; good vs evil; supernatural; appearance vs reality
“Two or three men, my lord, who brought the message that Macduff has fled to England.” Act 4 Scene 1Lennox is still acting as if he is loyal to Macbeth and sharing information with him. Themes/motifs: ambition; the divine right of kings
“I’ll raid Macduff’s castle, seize the town of Fife, and kill his wife, his children, and anyone else unfortunate enough to stand in line for his inheritance.” Act 4 Scene 1Macbeth reveals the depths of his ambition when he announces his plan to wipe out the Macduff family, despite Macduff having done nothing yet to harm Macbeth. Themes/motifs: ambition; kingship; good vs evil; murder
“It’s not safe for me to say much more than this, but times are bad when people get denounced as traitors and don’t even know why.” Act 4 Scene 2Ross to Lady Macduff. He believes Macbeth will kill anyone he perceives to be a traitor. Themes/motifs: ambition; kingship; good vs evil; murder
“He has a father, and yet he is fatherless.” Act 4 Scene 2Lady Macduff is referring to Macduff’s absence during the conflict: he has run away and left his son vulnerable to attack.Themes/motifs: gender roles; appearance vs reality
“Then the liars are fools, for there are enough liars in the world to beat up the honest men and hang them.” Act 4 Scene 2Lady Macduff’s son not only appears more mature than his years, but makes an ironic observation given Macbeth’s tyranny.Themes/motifs: appearance vs reality; tyranny; violence
“I’m afraid something dangerous is coming toward you. If you’ll take a simple man’s advice, don’t be here when it arrives. Go away and take your children.” Act 4 Scene 2 A messenger to Lady Macduff warning that Macbeth’s forces are heading for their castle. Themes/motifs: tyranny; violence; gender roles
“He has killed me, Mother. Run away, I beg you!” Act 4 Scene 2Lady Macduff’s son’s last words are an attempt to save his mother. Themes/motifs: tyranny; violence; gender roles; good vs evil
“You were one of his favorites. He hasn’t done anything to harm you yet. I’m inexperienced, but maybe you’re planning to win Macbeth’s favour by betraying me to him.” Act 4 Scene 3Malcolm doesn’t trust Macduff and questions whether Macduff is there to kill him on Macbeth’s behalf. Themes/motifs: appearance vs reality; tyranny; violence
“I am not treacherous.” Act 4 Scene 3Macduff defending himself to Malcolm.Themes/motifs: appearance vs reality; tyranny; violence; good vs evil
“Why did you leave your wife and child vulnerable—the most precious things in your life, those strong bonds of love?” Act 4 Scene 3Malcolm questions Macduff’s loyalty: if his wife and child cannot trust him, why should Malcolm? Themes/motifs: appearance vs reality; tyranny; violence; good vs evil
“Fit to be king? You’re not fit to live!—Oh miserable nation, ruled by a usurping, murderous tyrant, when will you see peaceful days again?” Act 4 Scene 3Macduff is outraged by Macbeth’s behaviour on the throne and puts the importance of his country above that of his family. Themes/motifs: appearance vs reality; tyranny; violence; good vs evil; divine right of kings
“I admit that he’s murderous, lecherous, greedy, lying, deceitful, violent, malicious, and guilty of every sin that has a name. But there is no end, absolutely none, to my sexual desires. Your wives, your daughters, your old women, and your young maids together could not satisfy my lust.” Act 4 Scene 3Malcolm compares his desire for justice and his righteous place on the throne to insatiable sexual desire.Themes/motifs: appearance vs reality; tyranny; violence; good vs evil; divine right of kings; gender roles
“Macduff, this passionate outburst, which proves your integrity, has removed my doubts about you and made me realize that you really are trustworthy and honourable” Act 4 Scene 3Malcolm trusts Macduff because of the passion of his speech against Macbeth.Themes/motifs: appearance vs reality; tyranny; violence; good vs evil; divine right of kings
“They were at peace when I left them.” Act 4 Scene 3Ross delivering the news of death to Macduff.Themes/motifs: tyranny; violence; good vs evil; sleep
“Let this anger sharpen your sword. Transform your grief into anger. Don’t block the feelings in your heart; let them loose as rage.” Act 4 Scene 3Malcolm suggesting Macduff avenge his family.Themes/motifs: tyranny; violence; good vs evil; divine right of kings
“Bring me face to face with Macbeth, that devil of Scotland. Put him within the reach of my sword, and if he escapes, may heaven forgive him as well!” Act 4 Scene 3Macduff agreeing to wage war on Macbeth.Themes/motifs: appearance vs reality; tyranny; violence; good vs evil; divine right of kings; swords

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