Act 1 & Act 2 Literary Devices- the Crucible

What is this an example of?Parris: “Child. Sit you down.” Anostrophe
The order of the noun and the adjective in the sentence is exchanged; the inversion of the usual order of words or clauses Anostrophe
What is this an example of?Procter: “The road past my house is a pilgrimage to Salem all morning. The town’s mumbling witchcraft. Metaphor/ personification?
What is this an example of?Abigail:”…I cannot sleep for dreamin’; I cannot dream but I wake and walk about the house as though I’d find you comin’ through some door…” Anadiplosis
The repetition of a word or words in successive clauses in such a way that the second clause starts with the same word which marks the end of the previous clause Anadiplosis
What is this an example of?Proctor: “…We never touched Abby.”Abigail: “Aye, but we did.”Proctor: “Aye, but we did not.” Irony
words or phrases are repeated in quick succession after each other for emphasis Epizeuxis
What is this an example of?Rebecca: “…There is prodigious danger in the seeking of loose spirits. I fear it, I fear it.” Epizeuxis
What is this an example of?Paris: “…I do not wish to be put out like the cat whenever some majority feels the whim.” Simile
What is this an example of?Paris: “What are we Quakers? We are not Quakers here yet, Mr. Proctor. And you tell that to your followers!” Hypophora
The writer first poses a question and then answers it immediately Hypophora
What is this an example of?Giles: “…I never thought you had so much iron in you.” Metaphor
What is this an example of?Paris: “…My, they’re heavy! (Referring to books)Hale: “They must be; they are weighted with authority.” Double entendre/ pun
A literary device that can be defined as a phrase or a figure of speech that might have multiple senses, interpretations, or two different meanings or that could be understood in two different ways Double entendre
A play on words in which a humorous effect is produced by using a word that suggests two or more meanings or by exploiting similar sounding words having different meanings Pun
What is this an example of?Parris: “Why Rebecca, we may open up the boil of all our troubles today!” Metaphor
What is this an example of?Giles: “That’s deep, Mr. Parris, deep, deep!
What is this an example of?Proctor: “…Lilacs have a purple smell.” imagery
What is this an example of?Proctor: “How may that mouse frighten you, Elizabeth? You-“ metaphor
What is this an example of?Elizabeth: “…she raises her head up her chin like the daughter of a prince…” simile
What is this an example of?Elizabeth: “…where she walks the crowd will part like the sea for Israel.” allusion
What is this an example of?Elizabeth: “I would go to Salem now, John–let you go tonight.” caesura
involves creating a fracture of sorts within a sentence where the two separate parts are distinguishable from one another yet intrinsically linked to one another. The purpose of using a caesura is to create a dramatic pause, which has a strong impact. caesura
What is this an example of?Elizabeth: “I see what I see John.” diacope
a rhetorical term meaning repetition of a word or phrase with one or two intervening words. diacope
What is this an example of?Proctor: “…your justice would freeze beer!” hyperbole
What is this an example of?Mary Warren: “I am sick, I am sick, Mr. Proctor. Pray, pray, hurt me not.” anastrophe
What is this an example of?Proctor: “…Were I stone I would have cracked for the shame this seventh month!” metaphor
What is this an example of?Proctor: “I will curse her hotter than the oldest cider in hell.” hyperbole
What is this an example of?Hale: “…there is a certain softness in your record, sir, a softness. caesura
What is this an example of?Proctor: “…Thou shalt not make unto thee any graven image.”Hale: “You have said that twice sir.”Proctor: “Aye.”Elizabeth: “Adultery, John.” irony

You Might Also Like