A Midsummer Night’s Dream Reading Check Quizzes

Speaker?Now, fair Hippolyta, our nuptial hourDraws on apace. Four happy days bring inAnother moon; but, O, methinks, how slowThis old moon wanes! Theseus
WANES?Now, fair Hippolyta, our nuptial hourDraws on apace. Four happy days bring inAnother moon; but, O, methinks, how slowThis old moon WANES! decrease in size and roundness
Speaker?Full of vexation come I, with complaintgainst my child, my daughter Hermia.Stand forth, Demetrius. My noble lord,This man hath my consent to marry her.Stand forth, Lysander. And, my gracious DukeThis man hath bewitched the bosom of my child. Egeus
VEXATION?Full of VEXATION come I, with complaintgainst my child, my daughter Hermia.Stand forth, Demetrius. My noble lord,This man hath my consent to marry her.Stand forth, Lysander. And, my gracious DukeThis man hath bewitched the bosom of my child. annoyance
Speaker?So will I grow, so live, so die, my lord,Ere I will yield my virgin patent upUnto his lordship, whose unwished yokeMy soul consents not to give sovereignty. Hermia
Speaker?Relent, sweet Hermia: and, Lysander, yieldThy crazed title to my certain right. Demetrius
Speaker?I have a widow aunt, a dowagerOf great revenue, and she hath no child.From Athens is her house remote seven leagues,And she respects me as her only son.There, gentle Hermia, may I marry thee,And to that place the sharp Athenian lawCannot pursue us. Lysander
Speaker?How happy some o’er other some can be!Through Athens I am thought as fair as she.But what of that? Demetrius thinks not so. Helena
Speaker?Here is the scroll of every man’s name, which is thought fit, through all Athens, to play in our interlude before the Duke and the Duchess, on his wedding day at night. Peter Quince
The play proposed is “The most lamentable comedy, and most cruel death of Pyramus and Thisby.” In this context, lamentable means sorrowful
In the phrase, “The most lamentable comedy, and most cruel death of Pyramus and Thisby” what makes the speaker’s use of the word “lamentable” funny? It is an oxymoron.
Name the speaker.Answer as I call you. Nick Bottom, the weaver. Peter Quince
Name the speaker.An I may hide my face, let me play Thisby too, I’ll speak in a monstrous little voice, “Thisne, Thisne!” “Ah Pyramus, my lover dear! Thy Thisby dear, and lady dear!” Bottom
When Snug worries about learning his lines for the lion’s part, he is reassured, “You may do it extempore.” In this context, extempore means unrehearsed
Name the speaker.Let me play the lion too. I will roar that I will do any man’s heart good to hear me. I will roar, that I will make the Duke say, “Let him roar gain, let him roar again.” Bottom
Name the speaker.You can play no part but Pyramus; for Pyramus is a sweet-faced man; a proper man as one shall see in a summer’s day; a most lovely, gentlemanlike man: therefore you must needs play Pyramus. Peter Quince
Name the speaker.But, masters, here are your parts; and I am to entreat you, request you, and desire you, to con them by tomorrow night; and meet me in the palace wood, a mile without the town, by moonlight. There we will rehearse. Peter Quince
But, masters, here are your parts; and I am to entreat you, request you, and desire you, to con them by tomorrow night; and meet me in the palace wood, a mile without the town, by moonlight. There we will rehearse.In the quotation above, entreat means beg
Who is the speaker of the following passage?I am that merry wanderer of the nightI jest to Oberon, and make him smile. Puck
Who is the speaker of the following passage?What, jealous Oberon! Fairy, skip hence.I have foresworn his bed and company. Titania
Who is the speaker of the following passage?And this same progeny of evils comesFrom our debate, from our dissension;We are their parents and original. Titania
And this same progeny of evils comesFrom our debate, from our dissension;We are their parents and original.In the passage above progeny refers to offspring
And this same progeny of evils comesFrom our debate, from our dissension;We are their parents and original.In the passage above dissension refers to quarreling
Who is the speaker of the following passage?Do you amend it, then; it lies in you:Why should Titania cross her Oberon?I do but beg a little changeling boy,To be my henchman. Oberon
Who is the speaker of the following passage?Fetch me that flow’r; the herb I showed thee once:The juice of it on sleeping eyelids laidWill make or man or woman madly doteUpon the next live creature that it sees. Oberon
Who is the speaker of the following passage?Do I entice you? do I speak you fair?Or, rather, do I not in plainest truthTell you, I do not, nor I cannot loveyou? Demetrius
Do I entice you? do I speak you fair?Or, rather, do I not in plainest truthTell you, I do not, nor I cannot loveyou?When the speaker in the passage above asks, “Do I entice you?” he means “Do I lure you?”
Who is the speaker of the following passage?I am your spaniel; and, Demetrius,The more you beat me, I will fawn on you.Use me but as your spaniel, spurn me, strike me,Neglect me, lose me; only give me leave,Unworthy as I am, to follow you. Helena
Who is the speaker of the following passage?A sweet Athenian lady is in loveWith a disdainful youth. Anoint his eyes;But do it when the next thing he espiesMay be the lady. Thou shalt know the manBy the Athenian garments he hath on. Oberon
Who is the speaker of the following passage?One turf shall serve as pillow for us both,One heart, one bed, two bosoms, and one troth. Lysander
Who is the speaker of the following passage?But, gentle friend, for love and courtesyLie further off, in human modesty.Such separation as may well be saidBecomes a virtuous bachelor and a maid. Hermia
Who is the speaker of the following passage?Content with Hermia! No; I do repentThe tedious minutes I with her have spent.Not Hermia but Helena I love. Lysander
Who is the speaker of the following passage?Wherefore was I to this keen mockery born?When at your hands did I deserve this scorn?Is’t not enough, is’t not enough, young man,That I did never, no, nor never can,Deserve a sweet look from Demetrius’ eye,But you must flout my insufficiency?Good troth, you do me wrong, good sooth, you do,In such disdainful manner me to woo. Helena
Wherefore was I to this keen mockery born?When at your hands did I deserve this scorn?Is’t not enough, is’t not enough, young man,That I did never, no, nor never can,Deserve a sweet look from Demetrius’ eye,But you must flout my insufficiency?Good troth, you do me wrong, good sooth, you do,In such disdainful manner me to woo.The speaker in the above passage feels that She is being mocked because she is insufficient in beauty and therefore is being contemptuously wooed.
Who is the speaker of the following passage?For as a surfeit of the sweetest thingsThe deepest loathing to the stomach brings,Or as the heresies that men do leaveAre hated most of those they did deceive,So thou, my surfeit and my heresy,Of all be hated, but the most of me! Lysander
For as a surfeit of the sweetest thingsThe deepest loathing to the stomach brings,Or as the heresies that men do leaveAre hated most of those they did deceive,So thou, my surfeit and my heresy,Of all be hated, but the most of me!The speaker in the passage above suggests that he or she has overindulged in love.
The “rustic mechanicals” are worried because they think the ladies in the audience will be upset by the violence.
Bottom plans to reassure the audience with a prologue, which is an introduction spoken at the beginning of a play or other work of literature.
Bottom’s idea to keep the ladies from being overly frightened of the lion is to let Snug the joiner introduce himself to the audience.
Bottom illustrates his comic ineptitude when as Pyramus he recites his line, “Thisbe, the flowers of odious savors sweet.” The word “odious” should actually be odors
Puck causes Bottom to have the head of a donkey
Titania wakes up because of Bottom’s loud singing.
When Bottom declares his intention to leave the woods, Titania tells him he cannot leave.
When Bottom is with the fairies, he seems comfortable
Choose the name of the speaker of the following passage.Come, sit thee down upon this flow’ry bed, While I thy amiable cheeks do coy,And stick musk roses in thy sleek smooth head, And kiss they fair large ears, my gentle joy. Titania
Choose the name of the speaker of the following passage.Truly, a peck of provender. I could munch your good dry oats. Methinks I have a great desire to abottle of hay. Good hay, sweet hay, hath no fellow. Bottom
Choose the name of the speaker of the following passage.Her dotage now I do begin to pity:For, meeting her of late behind the wood,Seeking sweet favors for this hateful fool,I did upbraid her, and fall out with her.For she his hairy temples then had roundedWith coronet of fresh and fragrant flowers. Oberon
Her dotage now I do begin to pity:For, meeting her of late behind the wood,Seeking sweet favors for this hateful fool,I did upbraid her, and fall out with her.For she his hairy temples then had roundedWith coronet of fresh and fragrant flowersWhen the speaker says, “I did upbraid her” he or she means I scolded her.
Choose the name of the speaker of the following passage. How came these things to pass?O, how mine eyes do loathe his visage now! Titania
How came these things to pass?O, how mine eyes do loathe his visage now!The speaker in the above passage is declaring I hate his face.
Choose the name of the speaker of the following passage.Now thou and I are new in amity,And will tomorrow midnight solemnlyDance in Duke Theseus’ house triumphantly,And bless it to all fair prosperity.There shall the pairs of faithful lovers beWedded, with Theseus, all in jollity. Oberon
Now thou and I are new in amity,And will tomorrow midnight solemnlyDance in Duke Theseus’ house triumphantly,And bless it to all fair prosperity.There shall the pairs of faithful lovers beWedded, with Theseus, all in jollity.In the above passage, “new in amity” refers to having a newly restored friendship.
Choose the name of the speaker of the following passage.My lord, this is my daughter here asleep;And this, Lysander; this Demetrius is;This Helena, old Nedar’s Helena:I wonder of their being here together. Egeus
Choose the name of the speaker of the following passage.But, as I think – for truly would I speak,And now I do bethink me, so it is -I came with Hermia hither. Our intentWas to be gone from Athens, where we might,Without the peril of the Athenian law – Lysander
Choose the name of the speaker of the following passage.But my good lord, I wot not by what power -But by some power it is – my love to Hermia,Melted as the snow, seems to me nowAs the remembrance of an idle gaud,Which in my childhood I did dote upon;And all the faith, the virtue of my heart,The object and the pleasure of mine eye,Is only Helena. Demetrius
Choose the name of the speaker of the following passage.The eye of man hath not heard, the ear of man hath not seen, man’s hand is not able to taste, histongue to conceive, nor his heart to report, what my dream was. Bottom

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